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small lump. (Read 1335 times)


Slow-smooth-fast

    it is time for my cyclic achilles injury to surface again. I have rested it for 4 weeks more or less and iced etc to discover yesterday a small bump on the back of it which hurts when pressed. tendonitis? anyone had this? thoughts? should i still train? my friend says he would get some over the counter orthotics and heel cups. 

    What's worse is the fact that I received notification yesterday that I have been successful in the ballot for the Great North run in September. I really want to do this for my nanna who passed away from cancer but not sure how to tackle even getting to the starting line safely.

    "I've been following Eddy's improvement over the last two years on this site, and it's been pretty dang solid. Sure the weekly mileage has been up and down, but over the long haul he's getting out the door and has turned himself into quite a runner. He's only now just figuring out his potential. Consistency in running is measured in years, not weeks. And over the last couple of years, Eddy's made great strides" Jeff 14 Jan 2009

    jimmyb


      Hi Eddy,

       

      The same injury might be popping up because you keep training the same way.

       

      Does it pop up at the same point in training? (for example, when you start

      including intervals or hill training).

       

      Also, do you stretch your calves and achilles? If so, stop. Sometimes it's the stretching causing the problem.

       

      Also, consider using a more light minimalist shoe, if you are using trainers 10 oz or more.

       

      The best you thing you do is rest a little bit. Eliminate speed work for awhile, and stay aerobic.

      MAF work at this point can increase the probability of healing.

       

      Take care. Hope you heal quickly.

      --Jimmy

      Log    PRs


      Slow-smooth-fast

        Hi Eddy,

         

        The same injury might be popping up because you keep training the same way.

         

        1) Does it pop up at the same point in training? (for example, when you start

        including intervals or hill training).

         

        2) Also, do you stretch your calves and achilles? If so, stop. Sometimes it's the stretching causing the problem.

         

        3)Also, consider using a more light minimalist shoe, if you are using trainers 10 oz or more.

         

        4)The best you thing you do is rest a little bit. Eliminate speed work for awhile, and stay aerobic.

        MAF work at this point can increase the probability of healing.

         

        Take care. Hope you heal quickly.

        --Jimmy

         

         

         

        Thanks for that Jimmy. I was unsure of posting here as I have had a lot of flack in the past about my training, but this time I did take it more sensibly.

        1) I spent a lot of time, just getting the miles in, and it did seem to rear its ugly head when I started with the tempo efforts and intervals.

         

        2) I am guilty of not doing much stretching at all. I am not sure if I ought to start now or not? Heel drops etc?

         

        3) As for shoes, I am a little bewildered here. I thought that I would need a more cushioned shot, I have quite a few I currently use: Nike air Vomer0 +6, Nike Air Lunar Glide, Brookes Ghost, +4. I rotate these on a daily basis really. They are all quite 'bulky and supportive'. My 'speed shoes' are Nike air zoom marathoner, I do feel like I can run a lot faster, and feel better having a closer feel to the floor, but surely this will be to the detriment if I use these as they have not a lot of cushioning.

        I was under the impression that I need to ensure the achilles doesnt stretch too far causing excess stretching, does this mean I need to use more minimal shoes or a heel cup? Sorry, Im puzzled.

         

        4) I do enjoy MAF training, so may give it a whirl.

        "I've been following Eddy's improvement over the last two years on this site, and it's been pretty dang solid. Sure the weekly mileage has been up and down, but over the long haul he's getting out the door and has turned himself into quite a runner. He's only now just figuring out his potential. Consistency in running is measured in years, not weeks. And over the last couple of years, Eddy's made great strides" Jeff 14 Jan 2009

          I have NO IDEA what that lump could be, so take this with the appropriate number of salt grains ... I've been using a small roller from Trigger Point Performance Therapy on my Achilles since partially tearing it in FEB 2011.  I highly recommend it -- it's helped me greatly in recovering and managing that area.

          “Everything you need is already inside.” -- Bill Bowerman

            where exactly is the lump? Is it on the back of the heal, or up higher?

             

            If it's on the back of the heal, I'd suspect you have something called "pump bump" or "Haglunds Deformity". It's basically a bone spur growing on the back of the heel that starts poking and inflamming the bursa. 

             

            I had a mild case of this last summer. It was mild yet still hurt like crazy, especially if I pushed on the spot.   I saw a podiatrist and luckily I didn't to have the bone spur removed. I was able to remedy the problem with lots of stretching, flector patches, and flexible shoe inserts to raise the heel. The LAST thing you want to do is use a shoe with a lower heel. 


            Slow-smooth-fast

              I have put a pic below, it is not a big bump as you can see but painful all the same,

               

              Achilles

              "I've been following Eddy's improvement over the last two years on this site, and it's been pretty dang solid. Sure the weekly mileage has been up and down, but over the long haul he's getting out the door and has turned himself into quite a runner. He's only now just figuring out his potential. Consistency in running is measured in years, not weeks. And over the last couple of years, Eddy's made great strides" Jeff 14 Jan 2009

                I have put a pic below, it is not a big bump as you can see but painful all the same,

                 

                Achilles

                 

                The pic didn't show up for me. Anyone else?  It could be my work blocking it.


                Slow-smooth-fast

                  try it now. i edited

                  "I've been following Eddy's improvement over the last two years on this site, and it's been pretty dang solid. Sure the weekly mileage has been up and down, but over the long haul he's getting out the door and has turned himself into quite a runner. He's only now just figuring out his potential. Consistency in running is measured in years, not weeks. And over the last couple of years, Eddy's made great strides" Jeff 14 Jan 2009

                    Nope, just a bigger empty frame.


                    Slow-smooth-fast

                      I added the actual image above  no?

                      "I've been following Eddy's improvement over the last two years on this site, and it's been pretty dang solid. Sure the weekly mileage has been up and down, but over the long haul he's getting out the door and has turned himself into quite a runner. He's only now just figuring out his potential. Consistency in running is measured in years, not weeks. And over the last couple of years, Eddy's made great strides" Jeff 14 Jan 2009

                        I added the actual image above  no?

                         

                        you may have, but it doesn't show up for me.

                         

                        I tried to copy/past the image url (http://i40.tinypic.com/2n1ezqw.jpg) into a different window and I get a 404 error (i.e. not found). 

                        jimmyb


                          Thanks for that Jimmy. I was unsure of posting here as I have had a lot of flack in the past about my training, but this time I did take it more sensibly.

                          1) I spent a lot of time, just getting the miles in, and it did seem to rear its ugly head when I started with the tempo efforts and intervals.

                           

                          2) I am guilty of not doing much stretching at all. I am not sure if I ought to start now or not? Heel drops etc?

                           

                          3) As for shoes, I am a little bewildered here. I thought that I would need a more cushioned shot, I have quite a few I currently use: Nike air Vomer0 +6, Nike Air Lunar Glide, Brookes Ghost, +4. I rotate these on a daily basis really. They are all quite 'bulky and supportive'. My 'speed shoes' are Nike air zoom marathoner, I do feel like I can run a lot faster, and feel better having a closer feel to the floor, but surely this will be to the detriment if I use these as they have not a lot of cushioning.

                          I was under the impression that I need to ensure the achilles doesnt stretch too far causing excess stretching, does this mean I need to use more minimal shoes or a heel cup? Sorry, Im puzzled.

                           

                          4) I do enjoy MAF training, so may give it a whirl.

                           

                          Maybe you when bring in speedwork, your stride changes--might get too long. I have to shorten my stride and increase turnover not to heel strike. I've seen to recommended to keep the stride rate at around 180, but when I try that, my stride gets way too long and awkward at higher speeds.

                           

                          Just a thought.

                           

                          Stretching might not be the answer. Feet strengthening might be. Sometimes achilles is a strength imbalance problem. There is a particular exercise you can do that was developed in Sweden.

                           

                          From this article (click):

                           

                          "The good news about non-insertional tendinitis is that there is a new treatment protocol that has excellent success, even with some of the worst injuries. Referred to as heavy-load eccentric exercises, this treatment protocol involves placing a weighted backpack on your back while standing on the edge of a stair with your heels hanging off the stair. Using both legs, you raise your heels as high as possible, and then remove the uninjured leg from the stair. The injured leg is then gradually lowered through a full range of motion. The uninjured leg is then placed back on the stairway, and both legs are again used to raise the heels as high as possible. Three sets of 15 repetitions are performed twice a day with the knees both straight and bent. In a 12-week study of 15 recreational runners with chronic Achilles non-insertional tendinosis, Swedish researchers had a 100-percent success rate at treating this difficult injury6. "

                           

                          6-Alfredson H, Pietila T,Jonsson P et al. Heavy-load eccentric calf muscle training for the treatment of chronic Achilles tendinosis. Am J Sp Med 1998;26(3):360-6.

                           

                           

                          If memory serves me correctly, it was some guy, perhaps in the military, that invented it by trial and error on his own problem. Then the researchers took it from there.

                           

                          I hope this helps you.

                           

                          --JimmyCool

                          Log    PRs


                          Slow-smooth-fast

                            Nice one Jimmy B, appreciate the link. I will implement this. Good stuff.

                            "I've been following Eddy's improvement over the last two years on this site, and it's been pretty dang solid. Sure the weekly mileage has been up and down, but over the long haul he's getting out the door and has turned himself into quite a runner. He's only now just figuring out his potential. Consistency in running is measured in years, not weeks. And over the last couple of years, Eddy's made great strides" Jeff 14 Jan 2009

                              I can definitely see the photo.,

                               

                              I deal with the same issue (for the past 3 years now) and find the eccentric calf drops work very well.  The problem is finding the time and/or remembering to do them.

                               

                              I often do them at the gym (using a dumbbell) but never thought of using a backpack at home.  That's an awesome idea!

                              2014 Goals

                              Weight - 200 lbs (stuck around 211)

                              2000 miles (1190 as of July 1)

                              Work on stretching and flexibility (doing so much better at this!)

                              Stay healthy for Boston 2015 (have a BQ -9:00 time) - check!

                              Marathon - 3:10 (Goal Race in October)

                              HM 1:29:59 (Goal race in July)

                              10k - 39:59 (no goal race yet)

                              5k - 19:55 (19:43 July 4, 2014)

                               

                                For what its worth - I trained through achilles tendonitis last year at this time, and with reduced mileage over a couple months it did eventually go away and I was able to complete my spring marathon with no pain whatsoever.

                                 

                                After increasing my mileage this winter, the AT reared it's ugly head again, and I decided to go to my local sports med doctor (who is also a runner). Two weeks ago, he laid out this plan.

                                 

                                • Continue to run so long as the pain doesn't go beyond 3 out of 10 (1 being little to no noticeable pain)
                                • Don't run if there is any "grittiness" or "crunchiness" in the tendon
                                • Do the heel drops (his instructions matched the aforementioned article word for word)
                                • He sent me to physical therapy where they've given me gluteus medius and ankle strengthening exercises, thinking there may be some weak muscles contributing to the problem
                                • Also recommended Graston Massage (deep tissue) of which I've had one session, that was uncomfortable but not painful.

                                I don't have a bump like you do, but the tendon is clearly inflamed and larger at the point of pain.

                                 

                                I've got my fingers crossed that I'll see some improvement in the next couple weeks - it's no fun in the meantime.

                                 

                                Good luck to you.

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