Lactate Threshold (Read 433 times)

    I don't mean to be contrary just for the sake of it, but one response might be, "Ask Noakes"

    What does HE say about LT?  I'm curious...

      Take OP for example; many of his/her runs are not quite even an hour and many of his/her runs are faster than 10k race pace which is about an hour.  How many "elite" runners can you think of who train most of his/her training at 10k race pace?

       

      The OP's 10k pace is not "about an hour." He/she has not raced a 10k since September, after apparently only having started running from scratch in August. He/she curretnly does 5k tempo runs at 8:11 pace and 10-mile long runs at 9:28 pace.

      Runners run.

        @Nobby

         

        Aint no such thing Wink

         

        But as my knowledge of the subject is not in the same *country*, not to mention ballpark, I will quote from his book:

         

        "It is now clear that the blood lactate concentrations do not show a clearly defined, abrupt threshold response during exercise of progressively increasing intensity. Rather, blood lactate concentrations begin to rise as soon as progressive exercise commences. However, at low exercise intensities, the rate of the increase is so slow that it is barely noticeable. Only when the exercise becomes more intense does the rise become apparent, which perhaps explains the erroneous impression that blood lactate concentrations increase abruptly when the lactate threshold is reached" (Lore of Running, Noakes, p.159)

         

        This is only scratching the surface of what he has to say on the subject, which I think is fascinating - even if (like you mentioned) it's not particularly relevant to my training as a recreational racer. I *do* worry less about hitting some magical training intensity now, though.

        11/1 - Mendon Trail Run - 50k

           

          If, for whatever the reason, you really want to figure out the ball-park figure of your LT pace; probably one of the best things you can do is to hop on a treadmill; do some easy warm-up exercise, whatever you may do for your warm-up (brisk walk, easy jog, etc.) and start the belt speed of what you may consider a 10k race pace, checking constantly your HR.  Each 30 seconds, you crank up the MPH speed by 0.2MPH.  Continue to crank up the speed by 0.2MPH each 30-seconds while checking your HR...  For a while, your HR should increase linearly and you'll get to the point where your HR starts to level off.  This is loosely based on Conconi Test and this "deflection point" is roughly your LT pace.  

          Not that I am terribly interested in this, but for academic reasons can someone explain this.  I understood LT to be a where the HR rise is rather abrupt from gradual 'linear' increase one would see until that point as one increases their speed  (and this deflection point is the LT).  Wouldn't the HR level off closer to our Max HR?

          drifter


            Smile

             

             

            Lactate Threshold is defined as your one hour race pace.

            You should be able to talk in short sentences, if you cannot talk you are running to fast.

            Art

            http://fitatfifty-art.blogspot.com/

             

            Kill me is pretty much all I can say at the end of any race.

            Smile

              Not that I am terribly interested in this, but for academic reasons can someone explain this.  I understood LT to be a where the HR rise is rather abrupt from gradual 'linear' increase one would see until that point as one increases their speed  (and this deflection point is the LT).  Wouldn't the HR level off closer to our Max HR?

                Thanks Nobby, I guess I was confusing with the Lactate level which rises sharply at a certain effort

                  Yup, supposedly they correspond:

                   

                   

                  Thanks Nobby, I guess I was confusing with the Lactate level which rises sharply at a certain effort

                  RunningNut


                    I've always based my LT runs based on HR and not a specific pace. That helps eliminate some of the outside factors (wind, hills etc). My max HR is 182, I try to run my LT/Tempo runs in the 85-92% of that. So 154-167.

                     

                    HR isn't a perfect science either, that can vary based on a lot of other factors too. But it works for me.

                    RunningBrief - Free weekly email digest by runners for runners

                    zonykel


                      I find that maintaining a pace is simpler than maintaining a HR Range.

                       

                      I've always based my LT runs based on HR and not a specific pace. That helps eliminate some of the outside factors (wind, hills etc). My max HR is 182, I try to run my LT/Tempo runs in the 85-92% of that. So 154-167.

                       

                      HR isn't a perfect science either, that can vary based on a lot of other factors too. But it works for me.

                      RunningNut


                        on a flat course maintaining a even pace and HR should be pretty easy. Problem I have is that most areas I run are not flat, HR allows me to pace based on effort and not so much by pace. HR isn't perfect either, it's a trailing indicator so some of your own judgement has to come into play.

                        RunningBrief - Free weekly email digest by runners for runners

                          on a flat course maintaining a even pace and HR should be pretty easy. 

                           

                          Its worth pointing out that for most people working near race pace over a given distance heart rate will tend to increase at a constant pace. Conversely at a constant heart rate pace will decrease.

                           

                          On the other hand if you run at an easy pace then at constant heart rate you'll usually have constant pace.

                            I've always based my LT runs based on HR and not a specific pace. That helps eliminate some of the outside factors (wind, hills etc). My max HR is 182, I try to run my LT/Tempo runs in the 85-92% of that. So 154-167.

                             

                            HR isn't a perfect science either, that can vary based on a lot of other factors too. But it works for me.

                             

                            What's your feeling running at 85-92%?

                             

                            Generally I run my tempo at the pace that I feel comfortably hard, using McMillan calculator as a reference, on high end of the tempo range.

                             

                            I was searching for the LT and feeling, I came across this article.

                            http://www.runninginjuryfree.org/2008/09/lactate-threshold.html

                            5k - 20:56 (09/12), 7k - 28:40 (11/12), 10k trial - 43:08  (03/13), 42:05 (05/13), FM - 3:09:28 (05/13), HM - 1:28:20 (05/14), Failed 10K trial - 6:10/mi for 4mi (08/14), FM - 3:03 (09/14)

                              .deleted.

                              2014 Goals:

                              #1: Do what I can do. <DOING>

                              #2: 365 Hours training <NOPE, INJURED>

                               

                                I know the recovery time for different people is different, but I just wonder if next day your legs are as fresh as normal, does that mean you haven't run fast enough for the tempo run?

                                5k - 20:56 (09/12), 7k - 28:40 (11/12), 10k trial - 43:08  (03/13), 42:05 (05/13), FM - 3:09:28 (05/13), HM - 1:28:20 (05/14), Failed 10K trial - 6:10/mi for 4mi (08/14), FM - 3:03 (09/14)