How to pick a dog who's a running companion (Read 1038 times)

danadearest


    I run with a boxer and a pitt bull.  I don't think boxers are natural runners because of the pug nose and pit bulls are stocky and heavy so you wouldn't think of them as natural runners either but both of them love to run with me.

     

    Just make sure the dog you run with is at least a year old and give him or her time to get in shape.  They need time to get conditioned just like we do.

    danadearest


      Another suggestion...maybe you can run dogs that do not belong to you that would love some exercise.  I bet there are dog owners that feel guilty of the lack of time they give their dogs.  You could exercise their dog for them free of charge.  Win win.

      marathonaddict


        I adopted a 2yr old hound mix (approx 45 lbs) from our local shelter in January 2012. She's an awesome running buddy and training partner. On the days I don't feel like running I look at her cute face and waggy tail and KNOW I am going for a run. She's gone 15 miles with me so far. I do not know what my distance limit will be for her but I do know 15 miles is not her limit. She's actually super fast (averages 5-6 min/mile when we bike together with her setting the pace) but she is phenomenal at running my much slower pace. She runs with me on a leash attached to my waist. Occasionally she spots a bunny and picks up the pace a bit which in effect makes me run a bit faster but since I can't maintain her bunny chasing pace for very long she quickly slows back down to my speed. I taught her the words cross (cross the street/trail), left (take a left turn here) and right (take a right turn here) to help facilitate steering since she does run a few steps in front of me. I prefer her slightly in front of me so I can evaluate her energy level and make sure she's not stepping on glass, etc. She does a few quick pee breaks while we are running but so far has not pooped on a run (knock on wood). I carry pooper scooper bags just in case.

         

        It does take a bit of training to get a dog to run properly with you. Nail down the loose leash walk before you attempt running with him/her. The only challenge I still have with my dog after 900 miles of running together is getting her to drink enough water when we are running. I trained her to drink water on verbal command but when she's not that interested she will just lap a small bit of water so I will say the magic "Good Girl" words and we can get moving again.

         

        Our local shelters have a program where volunteers run with the shelter dogs on a regular basis. One of them calls it Jog with a Dog and the other calls it Fit with Fido. It's a win-win for everyone. The dogs get exercise and some basic obedience training and the volunteers get exercise and dog companionship. The dogs also wear a little coat thingie when they are running that says they are up for adoption so they get exposure to other people who are out and about and might see them and fall in love with them enough to adopt them. I considered doing this before I adopted my dog but knew I would get too attached to the dogs and end up adopting every dog I ran with.

          It does take a bit of training to get a dog to run properly with you. Nail down the loose leash walk before you attempt running with him/her.

          Not flatly disagreeing, but ... FWIW, I started running with my current dog (Bear) at the same time as training.  He's actually far better behaved when running than walking.  I bought a simple harness, mostly to avoid any neck strain and partly as "special running clothes" for him.  I only put it on him when we run, and he associates the harness with run-time.  A six-foot lead held in my left hand, looped a couple times around my wrist to shorten it; he runs on my left.  I treated him fairly liberally early in the run-training (and we were doing jog-walk mixes, too, easing him into it), and he picked up on it really quickly.

          “Everything you need is already inside.” -- Bill Bowerman


          Cats Are People Too

            I agree that herding dogs are great runners.  My current running partner is a shetland sheepdog who has gone up to 7 miles with no problem.  We are both adding miles and I am sure she can make a 10 mile long run with proper conditioning.  I used to run with my collie Brandibuck, but he has gotten older and now enjoys a cooldown run of about a mile.  One thing about the herders; they are often sensitive to vehicles.  My sheltie lunges at vehicles, probably an instinct to chase and herd.  So I have to always keep her on the leash and under control.  Luckily, there is little traffic when I run.

             

            Warmer weather requires more care and thought to running with a long haired dog.  We run in the early morning and I will do shorter loops with the dog so she gets out and exercised, but not over heated.

             

            Can't wait to see what you wind up with.  BTW, my dogs are from responsible breeders.  We make a lifetime commitment to give our dogs the best forever home we possible can in exchange for getting the traits and characteristics that match well with our family.  Its probably another discussion, but we have been refused by the local collie and shetland sheepdog rescues in our area because of a lack of a fence.  Our dogs never roam loose and enjoy several walks a dog, along with a run, so it was rather shortsighted on the Rescue's part in my opinion.

            beachrun


               

              -clip-   I don't think of labs as distance runners generally, though, but maybe I'm wrong?  Maybe it's just all the chubby ones I see around.

               

              It depends on the breeding.  Many folks don't know that there are show labs and field labs.  The show labs are calmer, heavier built with thick chests and not always the greatest runners although they will swim like crazy.  The field labs are usually high energy, lankier and can run all day but can be a handful as a house dog.  The two types are almost like different dogs.  There are breeders that are trying to bring the two lines back together.   I suspect this may be true for many of the sporting-type dogs.


              Rungry!

                Poodles are great runners, swimmers, and they love to play in the snow.  The problem with poodles is they are so smart.

                Jen


                Rungry!

                  Poodles are great runners, swimmers, and they love to play in the snow.  The problem with poodles is they are so smart.

                  Jen


                  dog person

                    One warning about making your dog a runner, those times when you need to leave him or her behind because you are maybe running farther than you think they can go, or you're doing a race,  or maybe it's too hot.

                     

                    Get ready for the major guilt trip  that they will lay on you.

                     

                     

                    Kristian


                    Not dead. Yet.

                      One warning about making your dog a runner, those times when you need to leave him or her behind because you are maybe running farther than you think they can go, or you're doing a race,  or maybe it's too hot.

                       

                      Get ready for the major guilt trip  that they will lay on you.

                       

                      In that vein... I have two dogs and I think I would feel bad about always taking one out for a run and leaving the other home.  It might end up being a bigger headache than it's worth.

                      How can we know our limits if we don't test them?

                      Austin V.


                        I would pick a dog that is natural at running. I know greyhounds are awesome runners (with the right conditioning).

                        Julia1971


                          I would pick a dog that is natural at running. I know greyhounds are awesome runners (with the right conditioning).

                           

                          Actually, I think the consensus so far is that greyhounds are awesome runners but terrible running partners.  Are you basing this on personal experience with the breed?  Because my greyhound was hilariously lazy so if you got an active one, I would consider you very lucky.  I swear I would say, "Do you wanna go for a walk?!?!" and he would lift his head to look at me but if I didn't actually move, he would flop his head right back down.  If he didn't have to do his business, he was not interested.

                           

                          I didn't say it before but based on later comments, anyone considering a greyhound also needs to realize these dogs can't be off-leash in an unfenced area.  The adoption agency will hammer this in your head - an unleashed greyhound is a dead greyhound.  You can ignore them once the adoption is complete but...  these dogs were bred to run and did not grow up responding to the name you just gave them.  That's a combination that calls for vigilance.  But, they are great dogs for other reasons.  For example, most are mute.  I heard my greyhound bark twice the entire time I owned him.  So, I never had complaints for my neighbors.  Including my neighbor who sued the neighbor on the other side because her dog barked too much (Portugese Waterdog).  And, talk about saving a life.  There aren't hard numbers out there but the euthanization rate for greyhounds is probably very, very, VERY high.

                          The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second best time is now. – Chinese Proverb


                          dog person

                            What is it with what I call the 'Two greyhound minimum rule'?  I swear I don't think I've ever seen anyone walking with just one greyhound,  always two or three of them.

                             

                             

                            Kristian


                            Girl Parts

                               

                              Actually, I think the consensus so far is that greyhounds are awesome runners but terrible running partners.  Are you basing this on personal experience with the breed?  Because my greyhound was hilariously lazy so if you got an active one, I would consider you very lucky.  I swear I would say, "Do you wanna go for a walk?!?!" and he would lift his head to look at me but if I didn't actually move, he would flop his head right back down.  If he didn't have to do his business, he was not interested.

                               

                              I didn't say it before but based on later comments, anyone considering a greyhound also needs to realize these dogs can't be off-leash in an unfenced area.  The adoption agency will hammer this in your head - an unleashed greyhound is a dead greyhound.  You can ignore them once the adoption is complete but...  these dogs were bred to run and did not grow up responding to the name you just gave them.  That's a combination that calls for vigilance.  But, they are great dogs for other reasons.  For example, most are mute.  I heard my greyhound bark twice the entire time I owned him.  So, I never had complaints for my neighbors.  Including my neighbor who sued the neighbor on the other side because her dog barked too much (Portugese Waterdog).  And, talk about saving a life.  There aren't hard numbers out there but the euthanization rate for greyhounds is probably very, very, VERY high.

                              +1

                               

                              Again, greyhounds are sprinters.  They don't run far AT ALL.  And when they are not running they are the laziest creatures on the planet.

                               

                              They also have no street smarts, and like most sighthounds, turn off their ears if they see something to chase.   And at 30MPH, you aren't keeping up with them if they take off after the squirrel and you'll have little hope of calling them back.

                               

                              They are really awesome pets though.  Smile

                               


                              Imminent Catastrophe

                                Just for perspective...

                                This dog was dropped off at a county animal control shelter and was scheduled for euthanasia in a few hours. Atlanta Doberman Rescue took him and has started to rehabilitate him for adoption. He was suffering from extreme malnutrition, mange, infection and probably heartworm. The look of despair in his eyes says it all...

                                 

                                BTW Dobies make great running partners.

                                "Able to function despite imminent catastrophe"

                                 "To obtain the air that angels breathe you must come to Tahoe"--Mark Twain

                                "The most common question from potential entrants is 'I do not know if I can do this' to which I usually answer, 'that's the whole point'.--Paul Charteris, Tarawera Ultramarathon RD.

                                 

                                √ Tahoe Rim Trail 100M 20/21 July 2013

                                Boston Marathon 21 April 2014

                                Tahoe Rim Trail 100M 19/20 July 2014