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30-20-10 ? What's all the fuzz? (Read 1058 times)


Black-Toe-Nailed

    I read about these intervals on the internet. 

     

    The claims seem pretty bold: Reducing the milage to a half, improve speed, cure baldness...

     

    Of course, nobody says if the runners they tested it on where elites, advanced runners or just novices doing 10 miles a week... and most importantly: What where they training for? 10K? Half Marathon?

     

    I'm not trying to critize the study or the interval (the references and link were to vague anyway). Almost on the contrary: It sounds like fun. 

    I just don't see the point on cutting down mileage. I did try a session of 5 sets of 5 intervals (30-20-10 + 2mins at recovery pace in between each set) and it felt rather good. 

    What is your experience with them? Are they of any value for a guy who already makes the classical quarter, halfs and miles, strides, etc? 

     

    --

    "If one can stick to the training throughout the many long years,
    then will power is no longer a problem. It's raining? That doesn't matter.
    I am tired? That's besides the point. It's simply that I just have to."

    Emil Zatopek


    HobbyJogger & HobbyRacer

      I found this:

       

      A just-published paper in the Journal of Applied Physiology outlines a new workout that could become as popular as Yasso 800s, because the “numbers” are just as simple. The new workout is called “30-20-10 training” (or 10-20-30). Veteran runners who followed the training for just 7 weeks improved their 5K times by four percent, dropping from 23:03 to 22:16.

       

       

      MTA: That article says that the control group ran under 9mpw. So are we to conclude that for people running under 9 miles per week, this workout may be beneficial?

      It's a 5k. It hurt like hell...then I tried to pick it up. The end.

        Speedwork helps your 5k time. Especially in older, long time runners who never do speedwork. Q. to the E. to the D.

          I read about these intervals on the internet. 

           

          The claims seem pretty bold: Reducing the milage to a half, improve speed, cure baldness...

           

          Of course, nobody says if the runners they tested it on where elites, advanced runners or just novices doing 10 miles a week... and most importantly: What where they training for? 10K? Half Marathon?

           

          I'm not trying to critize the study or the interval (the references and link were to vague anyway). Almost on the contrary: It sounds like fun. 

          I just don't see the point on cutting down mileage. I did try a session of 5 sets of 5 intervals (30-20-10 + 2mins at recovery pace in between each set) and it felt rather good. 

          What is your experience with them? Are they of any value for a guy who already makes the classical quarter, halfs and miles, strides, etc? 

           

          I found this:

          Oh, God...  Seriously, Amby...???

            Trying to understand that workout. Is that 3-4 sets of 10 sec at 90% intensity out of every min for 5 minutes, or a total of about 3 minutes of high intensity running in a 20 minute workout supposed to improve speed by 4% (performance in a 1,500-m and a 5-km run improved (P < 0.05) by 21 and 48 s)?  Call me skeptical unless the test subjects are new to running.


            Hawt and sexy

              9 mpw? And down from there? Who does that? RW. Oh, right...

              I'm touching your pants.

                In no way does the study recommend cutting mileage. I think that they wanted to isolate the effects of the workout, so they cut the mileage out/down. 

                 

                I don't think the study is particularly profound or necessary or teaches us anything new, but on the other hand, I do think a lot of long-time runners neglect and underrate the importance of interval work and speed training.

                 

                I find it interesting that what people are fixated on here is the lower mileage rather than the point of the study, which is that regular, moderate bouts of faster running done in a controlled way makes you faster. Which is sorta "duh" but then again if you look at how people train...


                Closed for repairs

                  I find it interesting that what people are fixated on here is the lower mileage rather than the point of the study, which is that regular, moderate bouts of faster running done in a controlled way makes you faster. Which is sorta "duh" but then again if you look at how people train...

                   

                  This is completely true (or at least completely makes sense) but the title makes it sound special with the 30-20-10 thing like it's that specific type of workout that makes the difference.  And I think that takes away from the broader, more important and probably more truthful yet very boring point you are making. 

                   

                  I want the magic bullet, please, not some mumbo jumbo about running faster to get faster.  Sheesh.. 

                   


                  Closed for repairs

                    Hey look here I am posting at 4:45 when I should be on my Tuesday run to my prerun before I run.  None of that is going to happen, my week is for shit now and I'm grumpy.

                     

                      That's why morning running is DA BOMB.

                       


                      Feeling the growl again

                        Speedwork helps your 5k time. Especially in older, long time runners who never do speedwork.

                         

                        Yup.  Yawn.  Nothing in that study said that the specific speedwork they used there is better than any type of speed workout; only that some fast running is better than zero.

                         

                        Double yawn.

                        "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                         


                        just a simple cat

                          Hey look here I am posting at 4:45 when I should be on my Tuesday run to my prerun before I run.  None of that is going to happen, my week is for shit now and I'm grumpy.

                           How are your six short friends?

                           

                          I  guess as you get more bodacious, you begin to lose more brain cells, because there is a limit to how much magnificence your body can house


                          Closed for repairs

                             How are your six short friends?

                             

                            Well one of them just gave me the "WTF" shoulder shrug as he was running and I was shuttling by spawn around town.  So I'd say he's "Happy".

                             


                            HobbyJogger & HobbyRacer

                              Yup.  Yawn.  Nothing in that study said that the specific speedwork they used there is better than any type of speed workout; only that some fast running is better than zero.

                               

                              Double yawn.

                               

                              But they even limited their study to people running less than 9mpw -- who cares what happens in that low-mileage space?

                               

                              I need to stop being so negative.

                               

                              GREAT NEWS!!!

                               

                              For all the people running 6 miles a week and no speedwork, this workout is the MAGIC BULLET!

                              It's a 5k. It hurt like hell...then I tried to pick it up. The end.

                                So, the take-away here is that speed work makes you faster? Is this news?


                                Suggestion for this thread: let's make a list of all the things that actually warrant study.

                                 

                                Here, I'll start:

                                 

                                1. Physiological effects of stretching

                                2. Black holes

                                3. Craft beer

                                It should be mathematical, but it's not.

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