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winter buildup (Read 1858 times)


Slow-smooth-fast

    The nights have drawn in and the pavements are starting to get slippy. I am looking forward to getting the fluorescent gear out and getting in the miles for next year. How do you guys adapt your training over winter months? People say its where you get the miles in and build for the new year. I currently avg 50mpw but don't know if I should increase this and what effect this may have on me? Is it worth getting in more miles? What I fear is that I may be able to increase my miles but if I get to say 70mpw for a month would I have to then maintain this on the new year? Would it be fine to do all additional mileage at a very easy pace as I don't want to push my Achilles but at the same time want to get some cardiovascular benefit out of it. Should this base be all relatively easy paced so that I can get through the rigors of many miles unscathed yet at the same time stronger at the end? Look forward to the responses and listening to your winter plans.

    "I've been following Eddy's improvement over the last two years on this site, and it's been pretty dang solid. Sure the weekly mileage has been up and down, but over the long haul he's getting out the door and has turned himself into quite a runner. He's only now just figuring out his potential. Consistency in running is measured in years, not weeks. And over the last couple of years, Eddy's made great strides" Jeff 14 Jan 2009

      Um... yes?

      "Because in the end, you won't remember the time you spent working in the office or mowing your lawn.  Climb that goddamn mountain."

      Jack Kerouac


      Slow-smooth-fast

        Anybody else please?

        "I've been following Eddy's improvement over the last two years on this site, and it's been pretty dang solid. Sure the weekly mileage has been up and down, but over the long haul he's getting out the door and has turned himself into quite a runner. He's only now just figuring out his potential. Consistency in running is measured in years, not weeks. And over the last couple of years, Eddy's made great strides" Jeff 14 Jan 2009

          I disagree with the statement: "...its where you get the miles in and build for the new year..." though I heard it and repeated it a lot when I was new to running.

           

          There really isn't a year or a season or whatever to running.  It's a year-in, year-out lifestyle.  If you have a spring marathon then you will be ramping your miles up, if you're racing the 800m or the mile on the track over the winter you'll be adding a lot of speed workouts on the track and putting less time in outside on the road.

           

          What you do for training over the winter should be determined by what races you are running over the winter rather than by what the month says on the calendar.

           

          Have fun running this winter!

            It's almost always worth getting in more miles, and any time you make a big jump in mileage it's a good idea to do  most of it at a relaxed and easy pace.  My own winter running plans consist of wearing more layers of clothing.

            Runners run.

              There really isn't a year or a season or whatever to running.  It's a year-in, year-out lifestyle.  If you have a spring marathon then you will be ramping your miles up, if you're racing the 800m or the mile on the track over the winter you'll be adding a lot of speed workouts on the track and putting less time in outside on the road.

              And I'll disagree with this statement, to the extent that each person's approach to their running is different.  Some people may point toward a marathon but race every weekend (or who train "generically" and see a marathon as just another race), others may intentionally limit their racing to only one or two fitness-check races over the 18-week cycle.  While admittedly a minority, I believe there are people who still do apply some flavor of periodization to their year.

               

              My understanding is that the OP is looking to regain his lost base, not be in race-shape at any time throughout the winter.  I'd +1 the miles approach.

              “Everything you need is already inside.” -- Bill Bowerman

                While admittedly a minority, I believe there are people who still do apply some flavor of periodization to their year.

                 

                Sure but I think his point was everybody's "year" is different.  So your winter base period might be someone else's winter track racing season.

                Runners run.

                  Fair enough.  I guess I got stuck on the "There really isn't a year or a season or whatever to running.  It's a year-in, year-out lifestyle." portion and took it to mean more or less always in shape to race.  Which I didn't think Eddy was looking for.

                  “Everything you need is already inside.” -- Bill Bowerman

                    Adapting a reply from a letsrun response I thought was right on:

                     

                    You climb a ladder one rung at a time. If you try to skip steps you are likely to slip and fall on your ass. 

                    Start off by trying a single week of 70. See how it feels. Do 5/5 (or 6/4) doubles six days then take an easy day of 10. Then, take a day off.

                    After that survey, back down to your comfort zone of 50 miles, then give a try at 60-65. Come back down again, then try another 70 (or two). Take a day off here and there. Then back down to 50. Then try a few in again at 60-65. 

                     

                    This should be your general approach. I think you will be able to handle 70ish mpw without a problem.

                    Whatever you do, do not get hung up on the miles. They should be fuzzy goals, not a concrete obsession.

                    I would start doing some sort of intervals almost immediately. start off with something that would seem ridiculously slow to you, lets say 10-12 x 200m at 45-50s with complete recovery. Frequent run-to-the-barns of 2-3 miles is good. As your body adjusts, lenghten the runs to the barn and run quicker/longer on those repeats.

                    If you aren't enjoying what you are doing then stop immediately.

                    DoppleBock


                      I get your point - But a down cycle each year is not a bad thing - To me the most logical time is when the weather is the worst and there are no races to run.

                       

                      I am not logical - So I usually run the least in Summer - Too many other things I like to do.

                       

                      Eddy - I think its a great time for easy miles and 1-2 easy to moderate workouts a week.  1 that touches LAT - Nothing crazy: 20 minutes at LAT or 5x1 mile is plenty.  The other one that touches faster speed - Could be striders or 1-2 minutes on / off.  Or as we in WI often have to do ... the dry pavement fartlek - If you happen to come accross an area of pavement without ice and snow ... Run fast across it until next patch of ice and snow.

                       

                      I also think its a nice time for group running

                       

                       

                       

                       

                      There really isn't a year or a season or whatever to running.  It's a year-in, year-out lifestyle.  If you have a spring marathon then you will be ramping your miles up, if you're racing the 800m or the mile on the track over the winter you'll be adding a lot of speed workouts on the track and putting less time in outside on the road.

                       

                      What you do for training over the winter should be determined by what races you are running over the winter rather than by what the month says on the calendar.

                       

                      Have fun running this winter!

                      http://a-big-horse.blogspot.com/ 

                      2013 Goals ~ Mar < 3:00, 5M < 29, 10k < 35  

                       

                      DoppleBock


                        Good season

                         

                        November - December:  Eat

                        January - Drink

                        February - Get pissed off how bad on shape I am in and start focussed training

                        March - Ramp up miles to ridiculous levels

                        April - Start rounding into shape - Run races (well) as part of huge mileage weeks

                        May - Ramping down mileage and snapping into faster shape - Run goal race

                        June - Hold onto fitness for one more goal race as you start dabbling in summer activities

                        July-Aug - Enjoy summer - very short season in WI

                        Sept - Get pissed off at mediocre fitness level - Training focussed and consistent

                        October - Run a pretty good goal race

                         

                        Repeat.

                         

                        Great Season

                         

                        November - January - Eat and Drink moderately while steady consistent training

                        February - Get pissed off that you are not at racing weight and start focussed eating and drinking - Continue consistent running

                        March - Ramp up miles to ridiculous levels - Weight starts to fall off

                        April - Start rounding into shape and weight - Run races (not well) as part of huge mileage weeks

                        May - Ramping down mileage and snapping into faster shape - Run goal race - Set PR

                        June - Hold onto fitness for one more goal race as you start dabbling in summer activities

                        July-Aug - Enjoy summer - very short season in WI

                        Sept - Get pissed off at good fitness but lower than May fitness level - Training focussed and consistent

                        October - Run a pretty good goal race

                         

                        Repeat.

                         

                        I really do not want to care about running 12 months of every year - I run many miles while not giving a damn about running!

                        http://a-big-horse.blogspot.com/ 

                        2013 Goals ~ Mar < 3:00, 5M < 29, 10k < 35  

                         

                          Fair enough.  I guess I got stuck on the "There really isn't a year or a season or whatever to running.  It's a year-in, year-out lifestyle." portion and took it to mean more or less always in shape to race.  Which I didn't think Eddy was looking for.

                           

                          Sorry, didn't mean to always be in peak racing shape...just meant to state that there are races all year round so whether you are ramping up or down should be determined by where you are, what's going on in your life, what your goals are and what races you are targeting rather than simply because it is a certain time of year.

                            Sure but I think his point was everybody's "year" is different.  So your winter base period might be someone else's winter track racing season.

                             

                            Taking up Mikey's and deluj's points, I'm sitting here reading a book, waiting for my daughter to wake up and scream, thinking, didn't Bernie Lagat take 5 weeks off in 2009, no running, no swimming, nada? Nothing but BBQ and playing trains with his kids, as he put it. Seems like a lot, but he's Bernie Lagat.  He must have a clue.  Anyone have some thoughts on when this could be a good idea for a hobby jogger?

                            "If you have the fire, run..." -John Climacus


                            Feeling the growl again

                              Taking up Mikey's and deluj's points, I'm sitting here reading a book, waiting for my daughter to wake up and scream, thinking, didn't Bernie Lagat take 5 weeks off in 2009, no running, no swimming, nada? Nothing but BBQ and playing trains with his kids. Seems like a lot, but he's Bernie Lagat. He must have a clue. Anyone have some thoughts on when this could be a good idea for a hobby jogger?

                               

                              I think anyone who trains enough to have a "peak" can benefit from some yearly downtime.  How much?  Probably personal and no right answer to that one.  Historically I started my downtime after XC (first week of November-ish) and started ramping up again Dec 1st, so about 3 weeks off.  Even this wasn't 100% off, just a lot lighter with no plan, structure or workouts...except a 5K Turkey Trot that was usually my slowest of the year.

                               

                              Rest the body, rest the mind.  If you are eager to restart training it was probably long enough.

                              "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                               

                                I think anyone who trains enough to have a "peak" can benefit from some yearly downtime.  How much?  Probably personal and no right answer to that one.  Historically I started my downtime after XC (first week of November-ish) and started ramping up again Dec 1st, so about 3 weeks off.  Even this wasn't 100% off, just a lot lighter with no plan, structure or workouts...except a 5K Turkey Trot that was usually my slowest of the year.

                                 

                                Rest the body, rest the mind.  If you are eager to restart training it was probably long enough.

                                Not a bad litmus test.

                                "If you have the fire, run..." -John Climacus

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