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'Arthritis risk' for middle-aged exercise addicts (Read 679 times)

beachrun


    wc and ms, inspiring stories.  Thanks, I needed to hear that.  I'm afraid I have a touch of spinal so it's good to hear your stories.

     

    Of course this is a very selective group here.  Anyone who developed debilitating arthritis from running would not be posting here.

       

      Too Much Sleep Could Kill You, Claims Study

       

      Too Much Food Can Kill You?

       

      Working Could  Kill Us

       

      Might as well sit around all day and shoot heroin. Can't argue with science.

       

      Better shoot up your heroin while standing up - sitting around is a lethal activity too.

      valerienv


      Thread killer ..

        I have pretty bad arthritis in my right knee,  I have had it since I was 25 I started running when I was 42 . I probably have it in my left knee and I also have it in my left foot . If you don't have it ,  you might never get it , you probably shouldn't worry about it .

        beachrun


          I have pretty bad arthritis in my right knee,  I have had it since I was 25 I started running when I was 42 . I probably have it in my left knee and I also have it in my left foot . If you don't have it ,  you might never get it , you probably shouldn't worry about it .

           

          xor


            NEWMAN!

             

                The arthritis in my toe and ankle is because of injuries from a car wreck in 1988. Running hasn't affected any arthritis issues - the big thing I notice with when the pressure drops quickly before a weather front. When it's enough to make me limp, I'll stick to walking that day. Most times I can run even with it. I don't generally need pain meds for it, thankfully!

                Marathons are habit-forming...

                "I can do everything through Christ, who gives me strength."

                Philippians 4:13, NLT

                  I'm 57  and although my knees and hips are fine I'm starting to feel some arthritis in my fingers so I've been doing some research.  The science is very conflicting.  I want to be able to play golf with my grandkids  and keep hiking and biking.  I love my trail running but if there's a chance of messing up my knees or hips maybe I need to switch to the bike.

                   

                  I know none of us want to believe this but......

                   

                  "A US study of more than 200 people aged 45 to 55 and of "normal" weight found those doing the most exercise were the most likely to suffer knee damage.

                  Running and jumping may also do more damage to cartilage and ligaments than swimming and cycling, researchers said."

                   

                  http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/8380783.stm

                   

                  My gut feeling is this...moderate low impact activity is protective of joints and generally good for one's health but running increases one's chances of getting of getting arthritis of the knees and hips.  Just talking with older previous runners seems to support this as several of them swear that running messed up their knees and hips.  Biking clubs are filled with ex-runners.

                   

                  But then you see studies like this that say running does NOT increase arthritis. http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1948208,00.html

                   

                  It's all so confusing and frustrating.  Stupid science.

                   

                   

                  Thoughts?

                   

                  We have a close friend that has Rheumatoid Arthritis (and has had it since a very early age - she is now 47).  Her doctors told her NOT TO STOP running, that running is one of the things from preventing her from getting worse.  She will be the first to tell you that running actually gives her relief.


                  Feeling the growl again

                    We have a close friend that has Rheumatoid Arthritis (and has had it since a very early age - she is now 47).  Her doctors told her NOT TO STOP running, that running is one of the things from preventing her from getting worse.  She will be the first to tell you that running actually gives her relief.

                     

                    I'm already on record as thinking running likely does not worsen arthritis, but note we have been talking about OSTEOarthritis.  Rheumatoid arthritis is a totally different beast, an autoimmune disease...not that this invalidates your point.

                    "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                     

                    skygazer


                      Uhmmm, do you think your running cause the arthritis in your fingers?

                       

                      I mean, obviously your other joints that you use for running have no sign of arthritis but the finger joints that you don't use for running do, and you're thinking you should switch to a different exercise to protect those good joints from getting bad? Regardless what the science you read says about arthritis, I'd say you're doing okay for the knees so far.

                       

                      BTW, I read from an NYT article that says (competitive) bikers have lower bone density and tend to fracture their bones than the normal population.


                      Needs more cowbell!

                        BTW, I read from an NYT article that says (competitive) bikers have lower bone density and tend to fracture their bones than the normal population.

                         

                        Huh.  I know cyclists generally have lower bone density than runners, since cycling is not weight-bearing (and it's a BIG reason why I still run in some capacity, instead of dedicating all of my workout time to the bike).  This is the case for swimmers, as well.  But are they comparing cyclists to the typical mostly sedentary person?  I can't imagine how an active cyclist could have lower bone density than a sofa-surfer.

                        I shoot pretty things! ~

                        '14 Goals:

                        • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

                        • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)


                        A Saucy Wench

                          I have arthritis in my right ankle.  Twice in the last couple years I have taken a couple of months off of running and the arthritis has nearly crippled me.  When I run everyday, it rarely bothers me.  Not even in the damp, cold PNW although some mornings are a little slow.

                          I have become Death, the destroyer of electronic gadgets

                           

                          "When I got too tired to run anymore I just pretended I wasnt tired and kept running anyway" - dd, age 7

                             

                            Huh.  I know cyclists generally have lower bone density than runners, since cycling is not weight-bearing (and it's a BIG reason why I still run in some capacity, instead of dedicating all of my workout time to the bike).  This is the case for swimmers, as well.  But are they comparing cyclists to the typical mostly sedentary person?  I can't imagine how an active cyclist could have lower bone density than a sofa-surfer.

                             

                            In either case it's often said that for older people a bit of weight training is particularly beneficial for bone density.

                             

                            Alcohol is also interesting - a very small amount might be good for bone density, but the kinds of amounts that many people drink is bad for bone density.


                            Needs more cowbell!

                               

                              In either case it's often said that for older people a bit of weight training is particularly beneficial for bone density.

                               

                              Alcohol is also interesting - a very small amount might be good for bone density, but the kinds of amounts that many people drink is bad for bone density.

                               

                              My mom is pushing 70 and won't do anything.  I wish she would, but she has an excuse why she won't do ANYTHING active...it's similar to her excuses why she is a complete technophobe.  She's 68 going on 90.

                               

                              The alcohol thing is interesting.  And that happy medium with alcohol is true for nearly all of its benefits.  Our PCP actually recommends DH have 'A' drink/day for his HBP.

                              I shoot pretty things! ~

                              '14 Goals:

                              • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

                              • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

                              workinprogress11


                                 

                                My mom is pushing 70 and won't do anything.  I wish she would, but she has an excuse why she won't do ANYTHING active...it's similar to her excuses why she is a complete technophobe.  She's 68 going on 90.

                                 

                                Sis?

                                 

                                Wow, you perfectly described my mom.  She's even exactly the same age.

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