POLL --- Do you use a heart-rate monitor in your RUN training? (Read 383 times)

    A heart rate monitor is a tool to report to the user something about those attributes of running that they are trying to improve, so would of course be more interesting to those in "training".

     

    Well, maybe true for some. But in terms of the attributes of running that I'm trying to improve, race times have always sufficed.

    Runners run.

       

      There is clearly a difference between runners who are trying to increase their fitness/times/speed and runners who are simply running for health or enjoyment.  The former I would deem as in "training" and the later not...although they might use the word to describe their practice of running to others.  A heart rate monitor is a tool to report to the user something about those attributes of running that they are trying to improve, so would of course be more interesting to those in "training".

       

      My point was that training has got to fall under the category of health and enjoyment or some other large category of life. Doesn't seem valuable as an "end in itself."

       

      By the way, you are talking to a 2:35 marathoner and competitive sumbitch, if that makes any difference. I think my experiences in getting wherever I've gotten in running are exactly what make me eschew the reductive form of training as a means to "fitness/times/speed." Getting "there" takes a lot more than "tools reporting to users."

       

      MTA: sorry about the words like "eschew" -- I am writing quickly! I should come back to this later.


      Not dead. Yet.

         

        Well, maybe true for some. But in terms of the attributes of running that I'm trying to improve, race times have always sufficed.

         

        Thats true.  Nobody is really trying to improve their heartrate.  lol

        How can we know our limits if we don't test them?

           

          Thats true.  Nobody is really trying to improve their heartrate.  lol

           

          You would be surprised at what motivates people.  I don't, but I think a lot of runners check their resting heartrate pretty regularly.  Even those that don't use a HRM for training.


          Not dead. Yet.

            By the way, you are talking to a 2:35 marathoner and competitive sumbitch, if that makes any difference. I think my experiences in getting wherever I've gotten in running are exactly what make me eschew the reductive form of training as a means to "fitness/times/speed." Getting "there" takes a lot more than "tools reporting to users."

             

             

            I see your point.  So you didn't think about improving your fitness/times/speed while you were "training" to hit your 2:35 marathon?  You just walked out the door each day and, much like the Dude, let the road lead you to better times?

             

            I get what you are talking about with the "existential" side of the whole running thing, and I feel it every time I run.  Thats mostly why I do it.  But I don't see analyzing your personal run times as a means of trying to improve "reductive" in any way.  It's just the other side of the equation, and is more useful to some more than others.  In fact, I think it is kind of closed minded to only look at one side of things; whichever side that is.

             

            PS. 2:35?  Holy crap.  I hope to complete my first this or next year.  Smile

            How can we know our limits if we don't test them?

               

              I see your point.  So you didn't think about improving your fitness/times/speed while you were "training" to hit your 2:35 marathon?  You just walked out the door each day and, much like the Dude, let the road lead you to better times?

               

              I get what you are talking about with the "existential" side of the whole running thing, and I feel it every time I run.  Thats mostly why I do it.  But I don't see analyzing your personal run times as a means of trying to improve "reductive" in any way.  It's just the other side of the equation, and is more useful to some more than others.  In fact, I think it is kind of closed minded to only look at one side of things; whichever side that is.

               

              PS. 2:35?  Holy crap.  I hope to complete my first this or next year.  Smile

               

              You say you see my point, but I don't see my point in your characterization of my point.

               

              I am not talking about not analyzing or just running dumb (though there are moments when we need to do just that.) I am talking about more productive, richer, and effective forms of analysis than looking at a heart rate monitor.

               

              In fact, I am talking about THINKING about your running. Of course I thought about my running!! THINKING is very different from "monitoring your heart rate as a tool to report to the user about attributes of running that they are trying to improve" -- what the heck does this even mean!!

               

              But yeah, that's me. Closed minded.

                 A heart rate monitor is a tool to report to the user something about those attributes of running that they are trying to improve, so would of course be more interesting to those in "training".

                 

                In my highly unscientific observations of the matter just the opposite has been true.  The more serious and competitive the runner, the less likely he is to use an HRM.  Obviously this is a generalization and not universally true, but to me it seems that it's the wannabe's (triathletes have already been discussed separately) who feel the need to try lots of technology to help them improve.  I don't hold that against them or intend it in a disrespectful way, but in general, it seems like it is the fast guys, the ones who are truly "training", who already know their bodies really really well, and they don't have nearly as much use for what an HRM has to tell them.

                - Joe

                all running goals are under review by the executive committee.


                just a simple cat

                  As a beginning runner, and unused to the subtle 'feelings' of the different pace and effort levels (it all seems so hard!)   I found the objective data points given to me by the heart rate monitor to be an invaluable tool.  Now that I am a far more experienced and sophisticated runner, I haven't the need for that raw and clumsy data as much.

                   

                  I  guess as you get more bodacious, you begin to lose more brain cells, because there is a limit to how much magnificence your body can house

                    plus it sucks to wear that friggin' anaconda around your chest.  Joking

                    - Joe

                    all running goals are under review by the executive committee.


                    just a simple cat

                      plus it sucks to wear that friggin' anaconda around your chest.  Joking

                       

                      Well at least I can tuck it under my sports bra ...Cool

                       

                      I  guess as you get more bodacious, you begin to lose more brain cells, because there is a limit to how much magnificence your body can house

                        You say you see my point, but I don't see my point in your characterization of my point.

                        I know I'm replying in humor to 2 of your posts today, but I did nearly spit out my coffee when I read this line.  Thanks!

                        2014 Goals:

                        #1: Do what I can do. <DOING>

                        #2: 365 Hours training <NOPE, INJURED>

                         

                           

                          it seems like it is the fast guys, the ones who are truly "training", who already know their bodies really really well, and they don't have nearly as much use for what an HRM has to tell them.

                           

                          Their heart rate monitor is their brain.

                          There was a point in my life when I ran. Now, I just run.

                           

                          Well, fuckers

                          He still stands

                           

                          The Diary of a Once-ran.

                            "A majority of experienced runners, including most elite runners, train without heart rate monitors, instead relying on a combination of perceived exertion and pace to monitor and control the intensity of their workouts.The success of these athletes is all the proof we need that a heart rate monitor is not needed to realize your full potential as a runner.

                             

                            Ultimately, the most comprehensive indicator of running intensity is perceived exertion, or how hard running feels. Perceived exertion accounts for not only heart rate but also all of the other physiological and psychological factors that influence exercise intensity. So you’ll always want to pay more attention to how hard running feels than you do to your heart rate when running. A heart rate monitor can be a useful tool; just don’t let yourself become a slave to it."

                             

                            Author Matt Fitzgerald

                            www.hplg.net  The Human Powered League - Solo Cup Series - Trail Building


                            Will Crew for Beer

                              plus it sucks to wear that friggin' anaconda around your chest.  Joking

                               

                              +1

                               

                              When I first started running I thought the HRM gave me useful data. As I gained some experience, I realized the data wasn't really all that useful.

                              2014 Goal: Run Monkey as my first marathon. Brilliant!

                              DoppleBock


                                Serious 'Training" happened in the absence of technology until recently.

                                 

                                People just learned to listen to their body for feedback instead of looking at a machine to tell them how they are feeling.

                                 

                                I believe it is easy to let "Technology" hinder training progress.  I would also argue that it could help.

                                http://a-big-horse.blogspot.com/ 

                                2013 Goals ~ Mar < 3:00, 5M < 29, 10k < 35