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I hate shoes! (Read 1041 times)

    Why couldn't there be a machine that you could just stick your feet into and it would give you a perfect shoe recommendation? Am I possibly the only person who's feet are shaped and function as mine do? There must be a shoe out there for me! My latest adventure is with a pair of New Balance 859s. The fit is good. Never realized that new balance a shoe shaped good for me. The problem is the though the monstrous heel on the dang thing. I asked for a shoe with a straight lass, some stability and a low heel. While running though they felt like gigantic breaks that caused my feet to slam into the ground. If these are considered to have a low heel I would hate to see one with a high heel. If I tried to run on my heels they felt actually okay, however they where completely unsatisfactory for a mid foot strike. Have your feet changed as you gained running experience? Brooks Beasts worked well for me for around 6 months. For some reason they started to become uncomfortable and they came out with a new model that didn't feel good for me. All of a sudden now I find myself in a situation where I can absolutely not find an adequate shoe for my feet. How come all running shoes seem to have such huge heels? Who really likes feeling like you have a brick surrounding the back of your foot? Thank you for putting up with my rant and any suggestions would be greatly welcome. MTA doing some research, NB 859 are designed for heavy heel strikers... no wounder Sad
    SteveB


      Chris_So_Cal, About 12 months ago, I decided that I also hated shoes, or at least I started questioning whether I needed them. (Depending on your world view most people would agree that people neither evolved nor were created with shoes, and thus the natural way to run is barefoot.) After reviewing the ideas in http://runningbarefoot.org/ I decided that I would try running without shoes. While the initial stages were challenging, I was soon running in road races as good, if not better, than I had for many years. My running is both on the running track and the road, and last Thursday I pulled out my old spikes and found that I performed better on the track and more comfortably without spikes (or any other shoes). As a side benefit, injuries are down and I’m not paying exorbitant prices for shoes 2 or 3 times a year. (However, being barefoot is not high fashion. At least that’s what my wife says.) A do have a pair of Vibrim Fivefinger for when I run cross-country (as I can’t see the surface well when running thru low shrubs and grass) and when I undertake fitness tests at work (their OHS policy, not my preference). Have a look at the website, give it a go and make up your own mind. Cheers from Australia, Steve
      2009 Goals:
      Run 6:30 mile (or 6:01 1500m or 10:10 2.4k).
      Run 6:15 mile (or 5:48 1500m or 9:45 2.4k).
      Run 6:00 mile (or 5:33 1500m or 9:20 2.4k).
      Run 5:45 mile (or 5:18 1500m or 8:55 2.4k).
      2010 Goals:
      Run 5:30 mile (or 5:05 1500m or 8:30 2.4k).
      Run 5:15 mile (or 4:54 1500m or 8:10 2.4k).
      Run a 5 minute mile (or 4:37 1500m or 7:45 2.4k) before 50th birthday (Nov).


      Needs more cowbell!

        Chris, how much stability do you need? the 859 is way more than just "some" stability. It's bordering on motion control. If you only need mild stability and like the NB fit, then I'd check out the 903 or 768. Both are straight-lasted and a lot less controlling than the 859. The 903 has a pretty low-profile heel.

        I shoot pretty things! ~

        '14 Goals:

        • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

        • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

          Why couldn't there be a machine that you could just stick your feet into and it would give you a perfect shoe recommendation?
          For what it is worth, there is a store near here that actually has one of these. It looks like a little scale with tons of sensors, and when you stand on it, it analyzes your arch and spits out a recommendation of shoes and/or inserts that the store sells. I think it is called 'the walking company', but two ladies where I work have daughters who run, and both have given rave reviews of its accuracy. Maybe you can look up someplace near you that has something similar. Good luck!
            Straight last is the way to go -- a nice wide stable platform like a cushioned extension of the ground. Look for a "neutral" shoe with good FLEXIBILITY. Forget the dual/tri density midsoles. They make shoes stiff and decrease cushioning. Sticking a wedge under your foot is a lame idea. Less is more! Let your foot move naturally. Yes, train barefoot sometimes. Strengthen the feet gradually. If you can't run without putting a cast on your foot, you should adjust your training or get on a bike, IMO.
              Chris, how much stability do you need? the 859 is way more than just "some" stability. It's bordering on motion control. If you only need mild stability and like the NB fit, then I'd check out the 903 or 768. Both are straight-lasted and a lot less controlling than the 859. The 903 has a pretty low-profile heel.
              How much stability do I need? That is a complicated question... I probably could use all the stability that 859s offer, however they don't seem to work for the rest of my feet. I need stability but I also need flexibility, I need to "feel" the road... the 859 give me NO feed back. They make feet feel like they pound the ground. Also, do the 903s fit like the 859? Most New Balance shoes don't fit my feet well... the 859 where an exception. I am so frustrated that I asked for shoes with a low heel, and I got shoes that are meant for heavy heel strikers. Also on the barefoot running, I am going to starting doing some running barefoot, at least a day or two at the local schools field. Can overpronators run barefoot safely just as easily as sombody with a neutral foot? Also I am very seriously considering seeing if I could find a neutral shoe that would work and add orthotics for support as needed. Anybody have any experience doing it this way?
              AroundTheHorn


                asics gt-2130. Game over
                Roads, where we're going we don't need any....roads.
                  asics gt-2130. Game over
                  Not for me, unfortunately. They made my arches sore. As soon as I switched to a different shoe, I was fine. It's too bad, because I liked the 2120s.
                    Not for me, unfortunately. They made my arches sore. As soon as I switched to a different shoe, I was fine. It's too bad, because I liked the 2120s.
                    I looked at a pair and they looked great....put them on.....UGH...felt the same as you Theresa......they weren't comfortable at all....they hurt my arches before I even ran.... Smile Big grin Wink Tongue Guys, check this out if you are interested in low cost shoes that dont change very often (this is kind of like GENERIC shoe) but you might like them..... http://www.vitruvianrunning.com/ I ordered a pair that were just delivered today so I'm interested to see how they feel. If you have questions on them call the number and the owner will return your call and talk for hrs about running shoes (he is a designer that worked for all the major running shoe companies before he decided to go out on his own)......this is an alternative but you ought to check it out...see what you think...

                    Champions are made when no one is watching

                      Chris, how much stability do you need? the 859 is way more than just "some" stability. It's bordering on motion control. If you only need mild stability and like the NB fit, then I'd check out the 903 or 768. Both are straight-lasted and a lot less controlling than the 859. The 903 has a pretty low-profile heel.
                      Zoom, you mentioned this before but can't find it. Is the NB 903 comparable to the Asics DS Trainer? I get talked out of trying the DS by store clerks that call it a racing shoe and not a high mileage trainer. But I think I'm becoming a more biomechanically efficient runner and don't need as much stability. I ran on the tradmil today with a new pair of Inspire 3's and felt like my heel was hitting before I wanted it to. As you say, I was fighting the shoe. I just wish the NB store near me staffed smart people. MTA: bad typos

                       


                      Needs more cowbell!

                        How much stability do I need? That is a complicated question... I probably could use all the stability that 859s offer, however they don't seem to work for the rest of my feet. I need stability but I also need flexibility, I need to "feel" the road... the 859 give me NO feed back. They make feet feel like they pound the ground. Also, do the 903s fit like the 859? Most New Balance shoes don't fit my feet well... the 859 where an exception. I am so frustrated that I asked for shoes with a low heel, and I got shoes that are meant for heavy heel strikers. Also I am very seriously considering seeing if I could find a neutral shoe that would work and add orthotics for support as needed. Anybody have any experience doing it this way?
                        I need moderate stability, but I also need a LOT of forefoot flexibility or I end up with peroneal tendonitis. I wear the 902 (didn't like the fit of the 903 quit as much, so I stocked-up when the 902 was discontinued) with Superfeet insoles (either the green or berry, though I prefer the berry--women's version of the orange). I learned this after a LOT of trial and error. Ran a marathon in the 902s with the Superfeet and it was perfect. I don't know if the 903s fit like the 859, since I haven't worn the 859 (I did run in the 857 for a while, but it was too much shoe). Most NB shoes fit me well, though. I can't do curved or semi-curved lasts without problems, so I've had good luck with NB. Another shoe that you might like is the Saucony Progrid Guide. I didn't have a good fit in the upper heel/achilles area, but the general fit was similar to a lot of NB shoes. The heels are bit more built-up than the 902/903, though.

                        I shoot pretty things! ~

                        '14 Goals:

                        • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

                        • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)


                        Needs more cowbell!

                          Zoom, you mentioned this before but can't find it. Is the NB 903 comparable to the Asics DS Trainer? I get talked out of trying the DS by store clerks that call it a racing shoe and not a high mileage trainer. But I think I'm becoming a more biomechanically efficient runner and don't need as much stability. I ran on the tradmil today with a new pair of Inspire 3's and felt like my heel was hitting before I wanted it to. As you say, I was fighting the shoe. I just wish the NB store near me staffed smart people. MTA: bad typos
                          Dumbasses...racing shoes are flats. Yep, the 902/903 is comparable to the DS Trainer, yes. Some people like more shoe for distances, but I did pretty much all of my marathon training and the race in that shoe. Couldn't have been happier. If someone is a really heavy heel striker they may not like it, but it worked great for me. I have the Inspire 4s and HATE them...so stinkin' stiff and hard (which is good for other things, but not running shoes, tee hee... Evil grin). I bought those before going back to my 902s and trying the Superfeet.

                          I shoot pretty things! ~

                          '14 Goals:

                          • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

                          • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

                            I have the Inspire 4s and HATE them...so stinkin' stiff and hard (which is good for other things, but not running shoes, tee hee... Evil grin).
                            for a second, I thought you were referring to a mid-run boner, but then, that's not possible. Thanks for the input. I'm going to try the DS trainer. The Inspire 4s were not bad to me. The 3s do feel different though. I think a little less shoe willl be better for me. More shoe makes me lazy and heel strike. Less shoe makes me more aware of my mechanics and I absorb shock with my body rather than with a big friggin shoe.

                             

                              for a second, I thought you were referring to a mid-run boner, but then, that's not possible. Thanks for the input. I'm going to try the DS trainer. The Inspire 4s were not bad to me. The 3s do feel different though. I think a little less shoe willl be better for me. More shoe makes me lazy and heel strike. Less shoe makes me more aware of my mechanics and I absorb shock with my body rather than with a big friggin shoe.
                              I have very light weight shoes that I wear occasionally... they don't give me enough support BUT I feel the ride is more gentle than these giant cushioned bricks that they call shoes. If you have to much shoe, yea it cushions your foot from excess impact... BUT the rest of your body feels it worse though. MTA Does anybody know anything about Newtons stability trainers?


                              Blaine Moore (MM#2867)

                                I recommend that you read this thread: http://www.runningahead.com/forums/topic/bab16fe2278a4924b2ad71dc323fc520 Big grin
                                For what it is worth, there is a store near here that actually has one of these. It looks like a little scale with tons of sensors, and when you stand on it, it analyzes your arch and spits out a recommendation of shoes and/or inserts that the store sells. I think it is called 'the walking company', but two ladies where I work have daughters who run, and both have given rave reviews of its accuracy. Maybe you can look up someplace near you that has something similar. Good luck!
                                Maine Running Company has one of these, although they don't rely on it exclusively. They also watch you walk barefoot and once in a pair of shoes they watch you run on a treadmill in them to make sure they are good for you.

                                Run to Win
                                24 Marathons, 17 Ultras, 16 States (Full List)



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