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Motivation (Read 173 times)

run.123


    What percentage of the time do you feel like running? What are you motivated by? The beauty of your surroundings? The solitude (or companionship) that your run provides? The push from your competition? The internal drive for self-improvement? Fitness?

     

    I ran on a couple of teams, but this is my first year running independently. I am trying to learn what I am motivated by, and whether I love running enough to make it a life-long habit.

     

    I would love to hear your thoughts. What do you do to make running a sustainable habit? Do you push yourself to run, or do you just run when you want to?

      I would say probably 90% of the time, I don't even think about whether I "feel like" running - I just do it because it's what I do. Occasionally I'm super motivated because it's a beautiful day, or I have an exciting trail run lined up or something like that.

       

      Maybe 5% of the time I'm feeling bored and jaded and do have to kick my own butt a little to get out the door, motivated by the thought of how much better I'll feel when it's done. If it's a really bad day I may also have to bargain with myself: "ok, you just have to run for ten minutes and then you can stop", but I never do, I always keep going and never regret it afterwards.

       

      And then the remaining 5% of the time there is a valid reason for not really feeling like running: no sleep, or coming down with something, or I just did a hard workout or a high-mileage week and am feeling the need for recovery. When that happens, I may take the day off.

       

      I think in order to make it a sustainable habit, you have to push yourself to get out the door at first because you'll be too conscious of whether you "feel like" running. E.g. you get home from work after a long day and all you want to do is sit on the couch, or you wake up super-early to get a run in and just have 0 desire to get out of bed. After a while, though, you'll think about it less and less until it just becomes a part of your day and you can't imagine any other lifestyle.

       

      MTA: Having a goal race - or some sort of goal, even just reaching a certain mileage level - is a good motivator on the days when I just don't feel like it!

      NHLA


        What motivates you will change as you become a runner.

        When you were a kid you ran for fun, later you run to get in shape and compete, later you run for peace of mind, and finally you become a runner. You run simply because you are a runner. - Scott Jurek

        What motivates me is running to the top of every mountain I can see from Jump Off  Rock.


        Mmmmm...beer

          Occasionally I'll have a day where I need to push myself to get out the door, and I'm always glad I did when I get back from my run.  Having lost a good amount of weight helps keep my motivated to stay in shape.  Racing helps keep me motivated as well, if I ever feel like slacking off, I just remind myself of different goals that I have set for myself at different distances (BQing, etc.) and I know that the only way to get there is through consistent training.  It helps that I actually enjoy running.

           

          Having an outstanding trail run like I had yesterday definitely helps too, it's easier to push through the mundane runs in the neighborhood, when I know I have a beautiful trail waiting for me on the weekend. Smile

          -Dave

           

          2014 Goals | sub-19 5k done! | sub-40 10k | sub-1:25 HM | BQ done! | sub-3 M

            What are you motivated by? The beauty of your surroundings? The solitude (or companionship) that your run provides? The push from your competition? The internal drive for self-improvement? Fitness?

             

            Yes, yes, yes, yes, yes.  I like what runharrietrun said: "I just do it because it's what I do."  I run every morning, therefore there's no bargaining.  I get up, go out the door and run for an hour before I do anything else.  It's a lot easier when there's no bargaining involved.

            Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

            DDXD


            Slower than I look

              I would say probably 90% of the time, I don't even think about whether I "feel like" running - I just do it because it's what I do. Occasionally I'm super motivated because it's a beautiful day, or I have an exciting trail run lined up or something like that.

               

              Maybe 5% of the time I'm feeling bored and jaded and do have to kick my own butt a little to get out the door, motivated by the thought of how much better I'll feel when it's done. If it's a really bad day I may also have to bargain with myself: "ok, you just have to run for ten minutes and then you can stop", but I never do, I always keep going and never regret it afterwards.

               

              And then the remaining 5% of the time there is a valid reason for not really feeling like running: no sleep, or coming down with something, or I just did a hard workout or a high-mileage week and am feeling the need for recovery. When that happens, I may take the day off.

               

              I think in order to make it a sustainable habit, you have to push yourself to get out the door at first because you'll be too conscious of whether you "feel like" running. E.g. you get home from work after a long day and all you want to do is sit on the couch, or you wake up super-early to get a run in and just have 0 desire to get out of bed. After a while, though, you'll think about it less and less until it just becomes a part of your day and you can't imagine any other lifestyle.

               

              MTA: Having a goal race - or some sort of goal, even just reaching a certain mileage level - is a good motivator on the days when I just don't feel like it!

               

              I couldn't have said it better myself.  There is only one other thing to add for myself.  There was a period in my life where I allowed myself to become grossly out of shape and overweight.  I tried to break my habits 3 times and failed before finally succeeding (at least for the last 3 years - with 1 year of running).  So the one underlying theme for me is a simple but resolute statement - I will not fail.


              Running Chick

                i really just run.  i have never thought about being motivated or not - regarding running. it's just something i do (like singing to my children or eating or breathing).  but other things in my life DO require motivation (like starting new projects at work or at home)  And for those, I use the vision of the end result as my motivation.......  a goal.  Like a published article or a finished room as my motivation.  Smile  love.


                Boston Strong in 2014!

                  Why I run has been different at different times in my life. I first started running at the same time that I started graduate school. The goal of earning a Ph.D. seemed very daunting and would require a huge investment of effort for many years. I decided to run a marathon almost to see if I was capable of sustained effort over a long period of time with a goal of achieving something big. My success in sticking to a training plan, pushing myself to do more daily and weekly, and finally, to do something that I had never attempted before -- and succeed by finishing the distance -- gave me confidence that I could achieve big things through consistent hard work.

                   

                  I've since undertaken many more challenges and running means something different to me. For many years, it was an activity that I enjoyed sharing with my DH that got us outside regularly and was good for our health. More recently, I've enjoyed being more competitive and I enjoy selecting goal races, fine-tuning training plans, evaluating my performance, and working towards improvement.

                   

                  But ultimately, running has become so much of what I do and what I enjoy, that my day does not feel complete if I have not run. I've expanded and also enjoy cycling and swimming, but running still feels like "what I do."

                  2014 goals

                  2000 miles; 5k < 24:30; HM < 1:56Century Bike Ride

                   

                  Upcoming:

                  NYC Half Marathon 3/16Boston Marathon 4/21

                    I'm not a runner. I used to love running as a kid 30 or more years ago. But even in track I didn't like running long distance. Those were the other guys, their own club. I ran far enough to do the 400 hurdles. That mindset, if not capability, stayed with me as I aged. Short runs, like playing, were fun. But I never "ran" as an adult. My first 5k will be in December. I ran that distance in cross-country as a freshman, but not since, and never raced it in track.

                     

                    But, and here comes the motivation part, while I've been healthy and active my whole adult life, I ate too much and became old, fat, and slow. Now what? Diet and running are my answer.

                     

                    I'm progressing. Down from 225 in June to 192 in November. I can now run 4 miles without walking. Ran it yesterday. Next I'll try 5 miles. Will I try it today? I think my son gave me his cold. Do I need to run 5 miles? I want to lose 2 more pounds before Thanksgiving. Want to eventually get down to 165.

                     

                    Perhaps more than anything, I want to run easy like I did when I was 17. Even though I wasn't in the distance "club", I could float when I ran. I could take hurdles with either leg. I dreamed I was moving across the ground without touching. When I played soccer on defense, I could out run most the opposing wings. It was a mindset, something that stayed with me even after I let the physical capabilities slip away. Never champiobship level, I'm just talking about the feeling of being young and being able to run fast and light in any activity I chose.

                     

                    30 years later, with age 50 coming in a couple years, I realized that feeling was gone. Reality had caught up. My 8 year old son started to out run me in soccer. I'm greatful that my son is healthy and doing well. I need to set an example for him. I want to keep playing with him. I also want to recapture that running ability I once had.

                     

                    So here I am. I can dream it, talk about it, pretend it. Or I can do it. I lost .5 pounds last week, and lost 2 pounds this week. The more weight I lose, the more I can run. The more I run, the more I keep my metabolism going to help lose more weight on my diet.

                     

                    I don't know if I will ever become a runner. I just want to feel light again when I run. I've mentioned this crazy thought before in a different thread, but I'd like to be able to run the 400 hurdles again. I don't know if that is realistic or not. I guess everyone has to have a far off crazy dream. For me it is not the marathon. Not even a half marathon. 5k is the farthest I have an interest in racing. I'd even settle for 75 seconds in the 400 hurdles. There I just made up that goal now. Just as a reference, HS winning times are typically under 60 seconds, even for small schools. Right now I don't even think I could run a flat 400 in under 100 seconds, so I've got a long way to go to my new arbitrary crazy goal. Realistic goals are to run my first 5k, and get down to my goal weight of 165 pounds.

                     

                    My motivation revolves around all that crap Smile


                    Cheap and Evil Girl

                      My dog motivates me.  He needs his run.  And I would feel like I were letting him down if I denied him his weekday morning run.  Plus I would feel bad about myself if I skipped.  Even when I am hurt, I still go out and just walk if I can't run.  It is just what I do every morning M-F and there is never the question of "will I or won't I," I just do it no matter what.  I don't know how I got to this mindset.  I probably am a little obsessive and not in a good way.

                      I HAVE NO IDEA WHAT I AM DOING.  

                       

                      "Mental toughness is built by doing something that is hard over and over again, especially when you don't feel like doing it. Our society has conditioned us to believe that there should be no discomfort, to stop when we are uncomfortable. But the discomfort we feel when we're doing a challenging workout is an important part of the strengthening process." -Jim Afremow, The Champion's Mind: How Great Athletes Think, Train, and Thrive

                        I saw another "Motivation" thread a few weeks back, may have been here, may have been elsewhere.  Regardless, I responded that I park my car at the local trail-head, and start running; as I turn around I remind myself there are not one but two ice cream parlors within a few hundred yards of where my car is parked.  All the motivation I need to make a quick return.  Smile

                        LRB


                        Dreamer

                          Ultimately, I run to race.  So whether it is easy, tempo, or intervals, I know those runs will put me in position to achieve my race day goals.  I thus do them dutifully.

                          MRT: This too shall pass