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Effects of waking because of heat on training runs (Read 1056 times)

    I am about 5 five weeks into a training program for my 2nd 1/2 and this hot weather is killing me.  I have skipped some runs because it was just too hot (112 - I live in northern ohio)  and the ones I have run, I have run at a slower pace and I have had to add several walking breaks. My question is, will the walk breaks have an adverse effect on my training?  They are short, usually just until I am able to catch my breath, a minute or two tops.  My plan says to run 6 miles but this morning before it gets hot I did run the 6 but had to walk 3 times for a minute each (still very humid but cool).  Should I add a little distance to my runs or just call it done? 

      Try slowing down a bit more in the heat -- then you won't have to walk.

      And you can quote me as saying I was mis-quoted. Groucho Marx

       

      Rob

        I am about 5 five weeks into a training program for my 2nd 1/2 and this hot weather is killing me.  I have skipped some runs because it was just too hot (112 - I live in northern ohio)  and the ones I have run, I have run at a slower pace and I have had to add several walking breaks. My question is, will the walk breaks have an adverse effect on my training?  They are short, usually just until I am able to catch my breath, a minute or two tops.  My plan says to run 6 miles but this morning before it gets hot I did run the 6 but had to walk 3 times for a minute each (still very humid but cool).  Should I add a little distance to my runs or just call it done? 

         

        I think the answer to your question really depends on (a) what you're training for and (b) what the purpose of the specific run is.

        It should be mathematical, but it's not.

          The heat will definatley affect what you can do and how fast you can do it. 

           

          Like Troy said it all depends on what your goal here is and what your background is.  For example you did a half before but did you walk it or run/walk or run the whole time.  Is it a 12 week, 16 week, 20 week training program?  Do you want to beat your prevous time or just finish? 

           

          If you run the right pace you should not have to stop and walk.  You should slow down your pace and drink lots of water.  I don't lose my breath on runs but I can definatley tell my body is not happy with all of the sweating so I have to adjust my pace.  Plus to be honest it is just not much fun running in this heat and humidty.  I don't sweat much generally but this past weekend both of my runs (16 and 13.1) I sweated so much my shoes were soaked.  That is new to me and just disgusting.  

           

          This week it is supposed to cool off some.  I'm in Cincy.  You should feel a lot better this week.    Good luck with the training and if you need more helpful information give us a little more background on where you are coming from and what you are trying to accomplish with this race. 

          2014 Goals: (Yeah I suck)

          • Sub 22  5K
          • Sub 1:35 1/2 marathon 
          • Sub 3:25:00 Marathon

            I have been running for a little over a year and my first half was this past April.  I ran the whole thing but it was brutely.  I did a training program that was for beginners with a local running shop.  They got us there but just barely.  My goal time was 2:30, I finished in 2:24:42, so I beat my goal which was great but it was probably the hardest thing I had ever done.  I am running another in Oct.  In my infinite wisdom (or maybe lack of) I decided to up the training a bit in hopes that it will not be so terrible and as a way of testing the waters for maybe a full in the April.  I took the program they had us do and have upped the miles by about 30%.  My biggest week before taper will be about 40 miles instead of their 30.  It is an 18 week program so I am just about a third of the way in.  In between April and starting back to training I was not running very consistantly but was getting out there 3 - 4 times a week.  I guess my goal is to improve my time and "feel" better during the race.  I do try to get early in the morning when it's cooler and I usually do take water with me if I am going more than 3 miles or so.  I do hydrate well before and after as well.  Just shocked at how much the heat/humidity is effecting me and worried that it will derail my training.  I'm not a sissy about weather.  I ran all winter outside in snow storms, sub zero temps and wind.  I love to run in the rain but the heat and humidity are just killing me.


            Feeling the growl again

              Try slowing down a bit more in the heat -- then you won't have to walk.

               

              This.

               

              And don't over-drink, but make sure you're not getting dehydrated either, especially between runs.

               

              Even with the slower pace and miserable effort, you are still getting training.  It's hard to judge progress in the heat but it's usually evident once it cools off.

              "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

               

                Let me start by saying that I don't know the answer...

                What I've read, though, is that when your blood temperature increases above 98.6* (or whatever temperature), your heart rate increases.  So, in a hot day, your blood temperature will want to  increase quicker, and to a higher level, and therefore, your heart will work harder (pump faster) to work on cooling down your blood and regulate your blood temperature.

                 

                So, by running in the heat, you'll run slower because you'll be exerting more effort.

                 

                Adjust to the heat, and run slower and take walk breaks.

                 

                I wouldn't worry about the speed of your runs in the heat, and when (if) the cooler weather comes, you'll be conditioned and prepared. 

                You'll be fine.

                Cheers,
                Brian

                2014 Goals:

                #1: Do what I can do. <DOING>

                #2: 365 Hours training <NOPE, INJURED>

                 


                barefootin'

                  You are right about more training making the half easier.  I don't think "real" runners understand the pain a new runner experiences in completing a distance like that.  As you train more the half will get so much easier.

                   

                  Is there any way you can run in the morning?  It was hitting 105 here, but if I got out early the hottest was about 88.

                   

                  Heat training is very beneficial.  It's an additional load on your body though, so you may feel like you are backing off even though you are actually training harder.

                   

                  112 is just too hot.  I would try not to skip runs if possible, but I wouldn't worry about having to walk.  You will get there in your training, just keep putting in the miles.  When it cools off you will be flying.

                  Bill Wagnon / stl

                    Kathy you are doing good, consistent training- it is only to be expected that you will have to shorten some of your runs in this heat.

                    No doubt it will be easier as the weather moderates and as you make progress towards your weight loss goal.

                     

                    I would not suggest trying to "make up" for shortened runs as this may mean you start the next run before you are properly recovered.

                    PBs since age 60:  5k- 24:36, 10k - 47:17. Half Marathon- 1:42:41.

                                                        10 miles (unofficial) 1:16:44.

                     

                    jimmyb


                      Walking is fine, and you can actually build your aerobic system doing so.

                       

                      Heat stress has to be taken into account when training. If you were to race a 10k all out in 45° and then do the same course in 90°, the results of the race in 90° would be much slower.

                       

                      If you were to wear a heart rate monitor and did the same experiment with training paces at a fixed heart rate of (for example) of 140 beats per minute. In 45°, you might be running a pace of 9:00 per mile, but in 90° you might be running 11:00 per mile. Should you force the 9:00 pace? In my opinion, no. That 9:00 pace could be the same as your 10k or half marathon pace for 90°, and if you were wearing a heart rate monitor, you'd see your heart rate get near or even surpass those race HR's. FIne for 90° tempo work, but if you have a medium long or long run planned, you might be overtraining.

                       

                      Slow down or walk. Not a problem. Look into getting a heart rate monitor and work in specific zones for different types of workouts. They are an invaluable tool that will guide you through the change of seasons. It takes your current guesswork out of the picture. If your aerobic runs are supposed to be (e.g.) 150 beats per minute or lower, then your speed will vary according to temperature, humidity, and the current conditions of your body (tired, dehydrated, etc.). All you have to do is hit your target HR, and the pace will be what it will be.

                       

                      Good luck!

                       

                      --JimmyCool

                      Log    PRs

                        I have been running for a little over a year and my first half was this past April.  I ran the whole thing but it was brutely.  I did a training program that was for beginners with a local running shop.  They got us there but just barely.  My goal time was 2:30, I finished in 2:24:42, so I beat my goal which was great but it was probably the hardest thing I had ever done.  I am running another in Oct.  In my infinite wisdom (or maybe lack of) I decided to up the training a bit in hopes that it will not be so terrible and as a way of testing the waters for maybe a full in the April.  I took the program they had us do and have upped the miles by about 30%.  My biggest week before taper will be about 40 miles instead of their 30.  It is an 18 week program so I am just about a third of the way in.  In between April and starting back to training I was not running very consistantly but was getting out there 3 - 4 times a week.  I guess my goal is to improve my time and "feel" better during the race.  I do try to get early in the morning when it's cooler and I usually do take water with me if I am going more than 3 miles or so.  I do hydrate well before and after as well.  Just shocked at how much the heat/humidity is effecting me and worried that it will derail my training.  I'm not a sissy about weather.  I ran all winter outside in snow storms, sub zero temps and wind.  I love to run in the rain but the heat and humidity are just killing me.

                         

                        It sounds like you're on the right track here.

                         

                        If there's one thing I would recommend, it's doing some walking on days when you're not running--maybe twenty minutes or so. Getting your legs moving on off days can help some with recovery (as long as you're taking it easy), and more frequent exposure to the heat will help you acclimate.

                        It should be mathematical, but it's not.

                          Just get through the summer, don't go by miles on the plan but rather time running and you'll likely do fine, for example if the plan calls for 10 miles which you'd normally run in 100 min (10 min/mile pace), run for 100 min and call it a day, if you can only cover 9.5 or 9 miles so be it.  The body does not know miles run, just the time spent at a particular effort.


                          just a simple cat

                            Oh 'walking'

                             

                            I thought someone had perfected napping while running, and I was so excited!

                             

                            I  guess as you get more bodacious, you begin to lose more brain cells, because there is a limit to how much magnificence your body can house

                            xor


                              Yeah, when it is hot, it is way easier for me to wake up and go run than when it is chilly and raining.  Especially w/ no AC in Seattle.  We only get, like, 5 hot mornings a year, but they suck.

                               

                                My question is, will the walk breaks have an adverse effect on my training? 

                                 

                                 

                                I personally dont think walk breaks adversely effect your running when you're training on really HOT HORRIBLE days.     I try not to do it (too often) but its not that unusual for me to take 1 minute walk breaks and on an especially HOT day, or on a day when I go out and dont feel all that great, I'll program some walk breaks into my run (like run 5 minutes and walk 1 minute or something like that).     So, my time for the day is a little slower than normal.........so what...

                                 

                                As far as adding a little distance --- I wouldn't.......if you're planning on going 6 miles and end up walking a little because of the hot weather, then just stop at the 6 mile point....don't worry about the time....

                                 

                                In a couple of months, the heat will settle down and it'll be a lot easier to run....

                                Champions are made when no one is watching

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