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"7 Workout Habits You Should Drop Now" - CNN.com article (Read 520 times)

mab411


Proboscis Colossus

    "7 Workout Habits You Should Drop Now" - from CNN.com

     

    What do you guys think?  Numbers 2, 4, and 6 seem to fly in the face of a lot of traditional running training standbys...but I suspect the target audience is those trying to improve overall fitness, rather than those trying to get a PR, so I can let them slide a little.

    "God guides us on our journey, but careful with those feet." - David Lee Roth, of all people

      Strength training can certainly have benefits for runners, but I'm pretty sure this has now been proven a myth:  "Building muscle means that those muscles are able to work throughout the day burning more calories when you aren't working out."  I would have to dig for the references, though.  I'm pretty sure that real research has shown that resting muscles.... rest.

       

      Regarding #6, doing the same thing over and over again, well, that's kinda what you have to do if you want to be good at something, piano playing, reading a foreign language, running....  But, yeah, this guy's goal is clearly getting people to be more healthy overall.  His plans are not going to help most of us run a faster 5k.

       

      I do kinda like his overall tone, though.  He comes across kinda no-nonsense, get with the program.  That's cool.  Too many people don't get their heart rate above the mythical "fat burning zone", never pushing themselves.  He challenges that idea, which is good, I think.

      - Joe

      all running goals are under review by the executive committee.

        "7 Workout Habits You Should Drop Now - If You Aren't Really Working Out In the First Place"

         

        Yeah these tips are not targeted for anyone with a better than basic knowledge of "working out" let alone endurance athletes.

        § SIGNATURE§

          "When you do the same workout routine over and over, your body gets used to it and it becomes easier."

           

          Oh please tell me when this is going to happen.

          Dave


          HobbyJogger & HobbyRacer

            "When you do the same workout routine over and over, your body gets used to it and it becomes easier."

             

            Oh please tell me when this is going to happen.

             

            Most entertaining post!

            It's a 5k. It hurt like hell...then I tried to pick it up. The end.


            delicate flower

              The elliptical machine was an invaluable tool while I was rehabbing after my ACL surgery earlier this year.

              proud sherpa

              daisymae25


              Squidward Bike Rider

                The elliptical machine was an invaluable tool while I was rehabbing after my ACL surgery earlier this year.

                 

                Agreed...I love the elliptical as an option for less weight-bearing cardio, along with the recumbent bike.


                A Dance with Monkeys

                  The elliptical was about the only one I agree with him on.  It is not a natural motion and I hate using the machine.  If I didn't workout alone, I would never workout between the work travel and living in a small remote community.

                    I'm guessing Jennifer is a she.

                     

                    As far as lists on "news" websites go, I thought this one was pretty decent in terms of advice for the masses.

                    Runners run.

                    GC100k


                      She kinda lost me by invoking the mythical muscle "tone" and by assuming the reason you exercise is to lose weight. But it's a harmless "lite" article with a mix of the obvious (lollygagging, sports drinks) and personal opinion (eliptical).

                       

                      Nothing really wrong with the article but it's one of those "I'm in the wrong business" moments when you realize that someone gets paid for telling people this stuff.

                        I'm guessing Jennifer is a she.

                         

                        As far as lists on "news" websites go, I thought this one was pretty decent in terms of advice for the masses.

                         

                        I'm guessing you're right!  Ha.  I should have paid attention to the actual name of the author rather than just imagining that the buff dude was the author.

                        - Joe

                        all running goals are under review by the executive committee.

                        Arimathea


                        Tessa

                          I think that the most important thing would be to get the sedentary population in the habit of working out at all, rather than criticizing the habits of the minority of the population that DOES actually work out.

                          scappodaqui


                          rather be sprinting

                            I loathe articles like this.  Snooty, self-righteous, and ultimately VERY myopic.  I'm angry enough to address it point-by-point.

                             

                            1.  The elliptical: I actually bought into the dislike of the elliptical for ages--robbing myself of an awesome conditioning tool I could've used to get through injuries.  I'm still mad at myself for that.  The fact is, most people shouldn't DO high-impact low-duration cardio all the time.  Yes, as the author says, it is possible to slack off on the elliptical, but here's a novel solution: don't slack off.  It's pretty simple for me to pick 4/1 intervals, jack up the resistance and get my heart rate above 170 for a good 40 minutes.

                             

                            2. Lower-intensity, longer cardio can and will improve your aerobic capacity better than whacko circuits that might also get you injured.  One thing about those circuits, though: they sure are marketable.  You have to click on the links to something else this trainer wrote to find out what to do (because it's a crazy random combination that anyone with half a brain could come up with on their own--it's just calisthenics, guys).

                             

                            3. Lollygagging, fair enough.

                             

                            4. This one depends on your goals.  I think most people don't do enough cardio OR enough weights, so why not encourage the general population to do both?  I am so sick of these articles poking fun at women in particular for not lifting weights enough; plenty of us do nowadays.

                             

                            5.  Sports drinks have their place (like during a long run or marathon) but they are expensive and overused, I agree.  Fair enough.

                             

                            6. This one really annoys me, because of the principle of SPECIFICITY OF TRAINING.  Apparently, the author wants us to constantly 'switch it up' at the gym, presumably to 'confuse' our muscles, whatever that means.  "Mix it up. By changing your workouts daily you will trick your body into working harder and burning more calories. It will also save you from boredom. Take that new kickboxing class or try one of my workouts."  AHA, 'one of my workouts.'  She's selling something!  In general, this is ridiculous advice.  You get better at running by... running.  [And even if you care about calories, if you build up your running fitness, you go faster and farther and... burn more calories].  You get better at squatting by... squatting.  Any sensible lifting program includes adequate variety but should focus on the main big lifts and their variations: squat, deadlift, bench, row, press.  Anyone who tells you to shake it up is selling you something, and wants you to remain a stagnant, unfocused jack-of-all trades.  

                             

                            Needless variety is actually the bane of a decent training program.  But hey, it keeps people confused... and thus, in need of an 'expert' personal trainer like the article's author!  What a coincidence!

                             

                            7.  I'll grant that working out alone isn't always the best (especially if you need a spotter for a lift).  But this will vary person to person.  Some people do better with others but some lose focus, and a lousy workout buddy who isn't motivated, shows up late, or, say, pushes the pace during an easy run, is worse than none at all.

                             

                             

                            Articles like this are getting real old, real fast.  I feel like I've read the same stupid, demeaning advice in every major fitness publication at this point.

                            PRs: 5k 19:25, mile 5:38, HM 1:30:56

                            Lifting PRs: back squat 176 lb

                              6. This one really annoys me, because of the principle of SPECIFICITY OF TRAINING.  Apparently, the author wants us to constantly 'switch it up' at the gym, presumably to 'confuse' our muscles, whatever that means.  "Mix it up. By changing your workouts daily you will trick your body into working harder and burning more calories. It will also save you from boredom. Take that new kickboxing class or try one of my workouts."  AHA, 'one of my workouts.'  She's selling something!  In general, this is ridiculous advice.  You get better at running by... running.  [And even if you care about calories, if you build up your running fitness, you go faster and farther and... burn more calories].  You get better at squatting by... squatting.  Any sensible lifting program includes adequate variety but should focus on the main big lifts and their variations: squat, deadlift, bench, row, press.  Anyone who tells you to shake it up is selling you something, and wants you to remain a stagnant, unfocused jack-of-all trades.  

                               

                              Needless variety is actually the bane of a decent training program.  But hey, it keeps people confused... and thus, in need of an 'expert' personal trainer like the article's author!  What a coincidence!

                               

                              I don't know, seems like okay advice to me. Imagine a runner who runs the same 3 miles at the same pace every day. Chances are, after a while, that runner is spending hours a week running, and probably not improving much, or at all. The author's advice is the same stuff thrown out all the time here - mix it up. Run faster sometimes. Run longer sometimes. Do both sometimes. Sure, the "trick the body" isn't the most sophisticated/scientific explanation, but it's not hard to relate to where she's coming from on that as a runner.

                              Come all you no-hopers, you jokers and rogues
                              We're on the road to nowhere, let's find out where it goes
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