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Skim Milk vs. Almond Milk (Read 322 times)

bap


    How do you milk an almond?

    Age 52

    2016 Targets - 100 - 13.2s, 400 - 62s, 800 - 2:30, Mile - 5:40

      How do you milk an almond?

       

      Seems like something that some rum might improve.

       

      bap


        Seems a tad cruel.

        Age 52

        2016 Targets - 100 - 13.2s, 400 - 62s, 800 - 2:30, Mile - 5:40

          Hey, a Nobby sighting!  It's been a while.

           

          I've never tried it and was surprised to learn almond milk has so little protein.

           

          This seems like as good of a time as any to mention Nobby's Nuts.

           

          Go ahead and nibble Nobby's nuts. Put them in your mouth. They are packed with salty protein. Apparently you can now extract "milk" from them too.

           

          Sophia_Wright


            Almond Milk is generally lower in calories? Especially unsweetened, which still tastes good where as I wouldn't touch unsweetened soy.


            A Dance with Monkeys

              Almond milk and skim milk are both heavily processed foods, not much different than a Twinkie.

               

              Whole unhomogenized milk or nothing.


              A Dance with Monkeys

                Back in the day, homogenization essentially involved vigorous mixing/shaking.  However, today, most large scale dairy operations make homogenized milk through high-speed centrifugation.  The centrifuge separates the source milk into its component molecules. Fat in one pot, proteins in another, sugar and liquids in another. The milk is then reassembled to spec. You want 1% milk, you mix everything together to get 1% dairy fat. "Whole milk" you want? Mix to about 3 1/2 % dairy fat. Skim milk, just re-assemble everything but the fat. This is food processing. Twinkies.

                 

                The problem is, the centrifugation process may shear the molecules and render them more inflammatory.  There are few studies that look at this, so most of what I am about to post is speculation and anecdote.  Modern homogenization makes it more difficult to make yogurt and cheese, indicating that the proteins are attenuated in some way.  Modern hogenization seems to be more highly associated with lactose intolerance and milk protein allergy, and possibly to other environmental allergies. When heating milk that has undergone a modern homogenization, it is far more likely than unhomogenized milk to stick to the pan or burn. And milk that has undergone modern homogenization does not taste as good. Food processing. Pop Tarts.

                 

                Unhomogenized milk is not easy to find.  Interestingly, if you want low fat milk, this is a great way to get it.  Skim the cream at the top (use it for you mashed potatoes if you want) and what remains is low fat.  It is the original skim milk.

                  Thanks Trent. That was very informative!!

                    Interesting, Trent. I have tried to make my own cheese and it was hit or miss. I guess I needed unhomogenized milk.

                     

                    I don't do dairy and I seem to have a sensitivity to almonds but almond milk makes a great nondairy white sauce. Even unsweetened soymilk is too sweet.

                    jimmyb


                    port-a-bella-potty

                      Great post, Trent.

                       

                      When you say a food is  "inflammatory", does that mean it causes inflammation in the intestines (or other parts of the body)?

                       

                      Thanks.

                       

                       

                      Back in the day, homogenization essentially involved vigorous mixing/shaking.  However, today, most large scale dairy operations make homogenized milk through high-speed centrifugation.  The centrifuge separates the source milk into its component molecules. Fat in one pot, proteins in another, sugar and liquids in another. The milk is then reassembled to spec. You want 1% milk, you mix everything together to get 1% dairy fat. "Whole milk" you want? Mix to about 3 1/2 % dairy fat. Skim milk, just re-assemble everything but the fat. This is food processing. Twinkies.

                       

                      The problem is, the centrifugation process may shear the molecules and render them more inflammatory.  There are few studies that look at this, so most of what I am about to post is speculation and anecdote.  Modern homogenization makes it more difficult to make yogurt and cheese, indicating that the proteins are attenuated in some way.  Modern hogenization seems to be more highly associated with lactose intolerance and milk protein allergy, and possibly to other environmental allergies. When heating milk that has undergone a modern homogenization, it is far more likely than unhomogenized milk to stick to the pan or burn. And milk that has undergone modern homogenization does not taste as good. Food processing. Pop Tarts.

                       

                      Unhomogenized milk is not easy to find.  Interestingly, if you want low fat milk, this is a great way to get it.  Skim the cream at the top (use it for you mashed potatoes if you want) and what remains is low fat.  It is the original skim milk.

                      Log    PRs


                      Interval Junkie --Nobby

                        Whole unhomogenized milk or nothing.

                         

                        Yeah, and screw that Ultra-pasteurized (aka irradiated) crap.  Irradiated Organic Milk -- gotta be an oxymoron.

                         

                        Of course, the only problem with unhomogenized unpasteurized milk: it only lasts about 2 days.  But it sure does taste delicious.

                        2014 Goals:  sub-3 Marathon 

                        Current Status 06/19: Pelvic stress-fracture = 6-weeks of no running.

                        mab411


                        Proboscis Colossus

                          Back in the day, homogenization essentially involved vigorous mixing/shaking.  However, today, most large scale dairy operations make homogenized milk through high-speed centrifugation.  The centrifuge separates the source milk into its component molecules. Fat in one pot, proteins in another, sugar and liquids in another. The milk is then reassembled to spec. You want 1% milk, you mix everything together to get 1% dairy fat. "Whole milk" you want? Mix to about 3 1/2 % dairy fat. Skim milk, just re-assemble everything but the fat. This is food processing. Twinkies.

                           

                          The problem is, the centrifugation process may shear the molecules and render them more inflammatory.  There are few studies that look at this, so most of what I am about to post is speculation and anecdote.  Modern homogenization makes it more difficult to make yogurt and cheese, indicating that the proteins are attenuated in some way.  Modern hogenization seems to be more highly associated with lactose intolerance and milk protein allergy, and possibly to other environmental allergies. When heating milk that has undergone a modern homogenization, it is far more likely than unhomogenized milk to stick to the pan or burn. And milk that has undergone modern homogenization does not taste as good. Food processing. Pop Tarts.

                           

                          Unhomogenized milk is not easy to find.  Interestingly, if you want low fat milk, this is a great way to get it.  Skim the cream at the top (use it for you mashed potatoes if you want) and what remains is low fat.  It is the original skim milk.

                           

                          Thanks, Trent, that's interesting.  And thank you for acknowledging the speculation where it exists.

                           

                          I disagree that modern homogenized milk, even obtained via the process you describe, is just as artificial or processed as a Twinkie or a Pop Tart.  I don't have either packaging handy at the time, but I bet there are a lot more chemicals and preservatives listed in the ingredients than the Skim Milk I do have handy ("Fat-free Milk, Vitamin A Palmitate, Vitamin D3").  If I take a potato, peel it, then put it in a blender with half of the peel, I submit that what I would have would still be a potato, just a completely different texture and less peel.  But I'm open (albeit skeptical) to the idea that whole milk might be healthier.

                           

                          What does it mean to "shear" a molecule?

                          "God guides us on our journey, but careful with those feet." - David Lee Roth, of all people

                             

                            Yeah, and screw that Ultra-pasteurized (aka irradiated) crap.  Irradiated Organic Milk -- gotta be an oxymoron.

                             

                            Of course, the only problem with unhomogenized unpasteurized milk: it only lasts about 2 days.  But it sure does taste delicious.

                             

                            Louis Pasteur is rolling over in his grave.


                            A Dance with Monkeys

                              When you say a food is  "inflammatory", does that mean it causes inflammation in the intestines (or other parts of the body)? 

                               

                              Probably to blood vessels, but that too is speculative.


                              A Dance with Monkeys

                                I disagree that modern homogenized milk, even obtained via the process you describe, is just as artificial or processed as a Twinkie or a Pop Tart. 

                                 

                                Nothing wrong with a little hyperbole to make a point Wink

                                 

                                 

                                What does it mean to "shear" a molecule?

                                 

                                Submitting large and complex molecules to substantial physical forces, such as happens during micro-seiving or centrifuging. This can alter the molecules in ways that make them more inflammatory, more sticky at a molecular level.

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