2012 Gardening Thread (Read 1515 times)


Feeling the growl again

    Don't mess with me, varmits!!  Two more today.  Finally got the groundhog and this is the third squirrel.  For all of you animal lovers out there I let them go.

     

     

    Man, I hope you were really careful with that 'chuck.  Those things are nasty.

     

    I'm waiting on you catching your first cat.  Leave those traps out  long enough, it'll happen.

    "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

     


    Prince of Fatness

      Man, I hope you were really careful with that 'chuck.  Those things are nasty.

       

      I'm waiting on you catching your first cat.  Leave those traps out  long enough, it'll happen.

       

      It has happened!  A couple of years ago I had the trap out.  One morning I wake up, look outside, tell the wife "Got him".  But wait, groundhogs don't have pointed ears.  Went out there and sure enough it was a cat.  That thing was not happy at all.  Fur all over the side of the cage, growling, etc.  I went back and got some gloves to let him out.  I blinked and the damn thing was two houses away already.

       

      As for the chuck, that's a small one.  It's a little early but I get the young ones that roam around looking for a place to stay.

      Semi-retired.

        Got the rest of the plants for my garden this year except for some roma/plum tomatoes.  I can't find a variety that is indeterminant, and the prospect of having a vine that only produces once doesn't thrill me.

         

        Last year I went from seed, and had a particular variety from Burpee that was fantastic, but I can't remember the variety and can't find on the website.

         

        It's too late now for seed, and all the plants I find are determinant.  I think there is ONE variety at burpee.com that is indeterminant, but it's not the same one I had last year.  But, I guess I'll order that one.

         

        As for potatoes, all the Agways in the area (except 1) were all out.  I picked up some Yukon Gold, Kennebec, and Katahdin.  The problem is, a) I mixed them up, and they all look the same and b) I don't know the length to harvest, and can't find it anywhere on the internet for the Katahdins.

         

        So, it's going to be some trial and error this year on the potatoes.  I figure I'll plant two of each variety, then pull them up at 60 days.  Then 80 days.   And take notes, because I probably can put some more in after I take the ones out.

         

        And NEXT year, I'll buy them earlier, and also label them.  What a dope I am...

         

        I was going to plant the toms and peppers tomorrow, but it's going to get pretty close to freezing over the next few days and I don't want to risk it.  I figure I'll be OK with the lettuce and broccoli and potatoes though, even if it does frost, right?  The broccoli?  Can that handle frost?

        Jeff

          You could try spraying the area...I mean it won't get rid of them forever if the racoons keep hosting them. It would cut down on them though. Every spring we spray our yard for fleas and ticks, just as added protection for my dogs and cats. They also get Frontline or Advantage, but I don't want one single flea or tick in my house!

           Again - just want to thank you for a brilliant suggestion. Just got off the phone with my pest control guy (actually named "Guy") who says he can spray for the fleas next week and it will "knock them down for quite a while." He also gave me the name of the raccoon trapper I'll call tomorrow to see what he thinks.  Guy sprays around our house a few times a year and gets rid of the 12-inch diameter wasp nests that surprise me from time to time, along with the ground bees nests. I was a little unsettled to have him tell me he has noticed where the racoons use the base of the big trees as their "bathroom." I have never seen anything unusual, but certainly am glad that I always wear gloves when working in the yard! Anyway, the problem is on its way to being resolved.

          Use your momentum...keep going.  You know you can make it.


          Best Present Ever

            Swiss Chard...

             

            What do you do with it?

             

            I've always heard it's like the easiest thing in the world to grow...so I have thrown seeds out the past 3 years...this is the FIRST year that it has actually grown, LOL. It's rainbow lights, all pretty colors and huge. What do I do with it? Sautee it? Boil it? Grill it?

             

            I usually chop it fine and sauté with garlic. I eat the stems - either chopped finely and started a bit before the leaves or left long, braised, and the gratined with a bit of gruyere. I throw it in soup, bake it in quiches, throw it on top of pasta with some chopped tomatoes, serve with sausages, eat it for breakfast with a fried egg or sautéed tofu ...
            vegefrog


              Happyfeat I'm glad that you are gonna get some help! Sounds like things should be under control soon Smile

               

              That groundhog is so cute! I've never seen one up close, in that cage he looks nice and innocent. If he was messing with my garden I would have other feelings about him I'm sure!!!

               

              Thanks for all the tips on cooking the swiss chard...I like egg suggestions...maybe an omelet would be a good idea?!

               

               

              Tech Tee, your Broccoli will be just fine with frost! It actually makes it taste better.


              Prince of Fatness

                As for potatoes, all the Agways in the area (except 1) were all out.  I picked up some Yukon Gold, Kennebec, and Katahdin.  The problem is, a) I mixed them up, and they all look the same and b) I don't know the length to harvest, and can't find it anywhere on the internet for the Katahdins.

                 

                So, it's going to be some trial and error this year on the potatoes.  I figure I'll plant two of each variety, then pull them up at 60 days.  Then 80 days.   And take notes, because I probably can put some more in after I take the ones out.

                 

                 

                I think that the Katahdins are a late variety.  Yukons are early.  Not sure about the Kennebec.  You can dig them up any time after the plants shrivel up, which happens soon after they flower (the flowers are attractive, BTW).  Of course, if you get hungry dig a plant up early.  I never count the days.  When the plants dry up I dig.  I'll leave some of them in a little longer so they store better.

                 

                I never had much luck with a second planting.  They don't like the heat.  I've had some volunteers come up late in the summer but really didn't get much out of them.

                 

                Next year you would probably want to check with the Agways early March.  They usually come in mid to late March where I am.

                Semi-retired.

                  So I'll just go by when the plants shrivel.  Cool.

                   

                  Is it one seed potato per plant?  Or should I drop a several in?

                   

                  Also, heck, they only cost $.59/pound, so if a second planting in mid-summer doesn't work, it's not like I lost anything.  It will just be empty space in my garden.

                  Jeff


                  Feeling the growl again

                    So I'll just go by when the plants shrivel.  Cool.

                     

                    Is it one seed potato per plant?  Or should I drop a several in?

                     

                    Also, heck, they only cost $.59/pound, so if a second planting in mid-summer doesn't work, it's not like I lost anything.  It will just be empty space in my garden.

                     

                    One or less.  If you're seeding from full potatoes, all you need is an eye and a piece of the "meat" and it will grow.  Usually I leave a couple eyes just in case....so you can get 3-4 plants from a single seed potato, if they are big ones.

                    "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                     


                    Prince of Fatness

                      One or less.  If you're seeding from full potatoes, all you need is an eye and a piece of the "meat" and it will grow.  Usually I leave a couple eyes just in case....so you can get 3-4 plants from a single seed potato, if they are big ones.

                       

                      Yep.  When I go to the Agway I try to get the small ones because I am lazy and can throw them in whole.  But if I have bigger ones I will cut them.  As spaniel says, an eye or two on either side and you are good to go.

                      Semi-retired.

                        Yep.  When I go to the Agway I try to get the small ones because I am lazy and can throw them in whole.  But if I have bigger ones I will cut them.  As spaniel says, an eye or two on either side and you are good to go.

                         

                        So what happens if I toss a whole potato in?  That has more than one eye?  Will multiple plants grow, then I should pull one out?

                        Jeff


                        Feeling the growl again

                          So what happens if I toss a whole potato in?  That has more than one eye?  Will multiple plants grow, then I should pull one out?

                           

                          You may perhaps have more than one shoot make it to the surface.  Don't worry about it.  Sometimes mine look like little octopi when I chuck them in the ground with all the shoots hanging off them.

                          "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                           

                            You may perhaps have more than one shoot make it to the surface.  Don't worry about it.  Sometimes mine look like little octopi when I chuck them in the ground with all the shoots hanging off them.

                             

                            OK, as long as those shoots aren't sucking the life out of the main plant.

                            Jeff


                            Prince of Fatness

                              OK, as long as those shoots aren't sucking the life out of the main plant.

                               

                              Spaniel beat me to the punch again.  You'll be fine.  I can't remember ever having a potato plant with just one stem.  There are usually at least 3.  Remember, all of the shoots are coming from the same seed potato, so if you were to try to pull one shoot out you would likely pull the whole plant out.

                              Semi-retired.

                                Why are garden statues and bird baths so freaking expensive?  I swear to god, everything around this area is jacked up price wise. 

                                - Anya