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Endurance Fuel Suggestions (Read 250 times)

    Taking 2 days to run 150 miles is a slightly different activity than running 26.2 in 170 minutes. They could have stopped for meals and taken naps. Not a lot you can take from that and use in your race plan.

     

    True, but apparently there was plenty of running similar distances at faster paces, if I recall correctly what I read in "Indian Running" by Peter Nabakov. That's another great read.

     

    Still, even if I were to know what they fueled with, that doesn't mean it would work well for me (or most modern people). Hell, it doesn't mean it worked well for them! These are just things I think about when I don't want to think about Cytomax.

       

      True, but apparently there was plenty of running similar distances at faster paces, if I recall correctly what I read in "Indian Running" by Peter Nabakov. That's another great read.

       

      Still, even if I were to know what they fueled with, that doesn't mean it would work well for me (or most modern people). Hell, it doesn't mean it worked well for them! These are just things I think about when I don't want to think about Cytomax.

      Thanks for the reference - just what I need, another book.

       

      FWIW, from the slow end of the speed spectrum, 2.5-3 hrs, maybe even 2 hrs, is where I might use something in addition to sports drink. In a 4-hr race, I'd likely be taking something by 2-3 hrs in, terrain permitting. (IOW, if I'm panting going up a 3000ft hill, I'm not eating or fiddling with a gel, until I get to an easier footing or effort situation. And chances are it would be more like a shot-blok rather than a clif bar or wheat thins. been there, done that) But about the only time I won't take something semi-solid with me is short races (< 1 hr) in urban parks. Whether I use it or not is another matter. (too much Girl Scout "Be Prepared" in me combined with an assortment of backcountry adventures and misadventures)

       

      BTW, I did test some gels today in an uphill hike (easier effort) after a uphill race (1-hr race effort). Race was powered by Citrus Cytomax. Smile   I did stop by REI on my way home to get more gels, and also noticed they did have cytomax that you can buy by individuals packets - just in case you change your mind. Wink

      "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog

        "Indian Running"?
        I am really curious what type of gels they use... "Hot Tanduree Endurance Gel", 'Mumbai Superspicy Masala Gel" XD
        Bet you run extremely fast with that... to the next bush.
        Or you can carry a lighter and run even faster with the afterburner effect Big grin

          "Indian Running"?
          I am really curious what type of gels they use... "Hot Tanduree Endurance Gel", 'Mumbai Superspicy Masala Gel" XD
          Bet you run extremely fast with that... to the next bush.
          Or you can carry a lighter and run even faster with the afterburner effect Big grin

           

          The whole title is "Indian Running: Native American History and Tradition", but your proposed flavors are intriguing. Smile

          Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

            A while back I was actually sent a promotional curry-flavored energy bar. It was pretty good, believe it or not.

              For goofy reasons I'll suggest non fructose corn syrup (like regular karo.)

               

              I still haven't tracked down the allergen behind my EIAn, so I sort of inverted the logic and made sure that I know some simple stuff that does NOT cause anaphylaxis.

              LMildon


                I am NOT shilling for my product - but want to share what I developed to address some concerns I had when I was training for a marathon using traditional gels. I've got a very sensitive stomach and was prone to the hideous runners ill-fated trifecta of nausea, vomiting and the ultimately dreaded...diarrhea, which I experienced using gels. I formulated Island Boost, and the key here is that I don't use maltodextrin which is a manmade carbohydrate - a polymerized carb similar to HFCS. The chief points are that it's a faster fuel (we use glucose as the primary carb which is absorbed into the bloodstream in under five minutes) and natural fructose for longer-lasting energy, coconut water for the electrolytes and natural fruit juices to give it flavor. Also, Island Boost is a LIQUID, not a thick gel. I find it hard to breathe and swallow with a thick goo coating the back of my throat.

                1. What endurance fuel do you currently use?  Island Boost, Jelly Belly Sport Beans

                2. What are its strengths and weaknesses? Island Boost strengths: fast fuel without nausea, vomiting or diarrhea. Weakness: it's sweet. We can't get around that because glucose is inherently sweet. I'm determined to use only the highest quality ingredients and yeah, it's sweet, but it's only in your mouth for two seconds.

                3. Where can you buy the product? REI, Amazon and through our own site.

                4. Where can I find out more about the product? Our own site - but really, do a Google search and read customer reviews. There are also reviews on the REI site and Amazon.

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