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Shingles vaccine (Read 135 times)

    A friend of mine was just diagnosed with shingles.  She is 35 and works as a nurse.

    Live the Adventure. Enjoy the Journey. Be Kind. Have Faith!


    Needs more cowbell!

      Oddly, everyone I know who has had shingles has been way under 60.   Mostly in their 40's

       

      I'd say at least half of the people I know were <50, as well.  Probably more than half, now that I really think of it.  A friend of mine had it on her face...that's scary.  I believe it can cause blindness if it spreads into the eye.

       

      My MIL's boyfriend had it a year or so ago.  Also on the face.  He had to be hospitalized.  He's actually the oldest person I know personally to have had it.  He was right around 70.

      I shoot pretty things! ~

      '14 Goals:

      • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

      • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)


      Needs more cowbell!

        Well, the Dr. said no to a shingles vac. until 60 years if no risk factors.

         

        So what do they consider "risk factors?"

         

        I will say, that when I had it I was on Advair for my asthma...something about that particular med made me sick ALL the friggin' time.  It was nuts the # that crap did on my immune system.  I'm on a similar inhaled steroid/long-acting bronchodilator now that doesn't seem to have the same degree of side effects (for me).

        I shoot pretty things! ~

        '14 Goals:

        • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

        • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

        cookiemonster


        Connoisseur of Cookies

          That's something I've wondered...if a person gets the CP vaccine, can they still get shingles later on...? Confused

           

          Yes.  They can.

           

          The chicken pox vaccine is a weakened live virus.  While it will protect from chicken pox it can still become dormant in the body (just like it would if a person had chicken pox).  The chance of getting shingles after having received the chicken pox vaccine is lower than if a person became infected through the way most of us were infected as a kid.

           

          The CDC has some good information on both the chicken pox vaccine as well as the shingles vaccine.

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          "C" is for cookie.  That's good enough for me.

            Risk factors.

             

            The first two risk factors are:  having had chicken pox and being over 50.

             

            Undoubtedly, it is all about cost.  Expensive.

             

            FDA approves it for 50 - 59.

            CDC only recommends for 60 and over.

            Many insurance companies won't pay for it or won't pay all.

            And it appears, after googling, that mine won't pay until age 60.

            steph  

             

            OCD  If you don't laugh...   

               The chance of getting shingles after having received the chicken pox vaccine is lower than if a person became infected through the way most of us were infected as a kid.

               

              The CDC has some good information on both the chicken pox vaccine as well as the shingles vaccine

               

              It appears that neither vaccine has been in use long enough to know all of the ins and outs.

              steph  

               

              OCD  If you don't laugh...   

              cookiemonster


              Connoisseur of Cookies

                What else about it would you like to know?  (General question... not saying I have all the answers)

                 

                The chicken pox vaccine has been used in other countries starting in 1988.  It was released in the US in 1995.  That's 25 years worth of experience and real life usage (not counting the time needed for research, to establish safety and efficacy).  The shingles vaccine was released in 2006, IIRC.

                 

                The efficacy of either vaccine is usually pretty well established prior to its licensure for use.  The FDA, while not perfect, is usually pretty particular about these kinds of things.

                 

                Unless, of course, you're worried about whether either vaccine will turn us all into zombies when we hit 65.  For that I guess we'll just have to wait and see.

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                "C" is for cookie.  That's good enough for me.

                  Sorry.

                   

                  What I meant was that I don't believe that we could know for sure yet weather the chance of

                  getting shingles is lower after the chicken pox vaccine than it would be after having had chicken pox.  

                  Not until those first vaccinated in '95' reach a considerably older age.  

                  steph  

                   

                  OCD  If you don't laugh...   

                  cookiemonster


                  Connoisseur of Cookies

                    Ah!  So you *are* concerned about the zombie apocalypse! Big grin

                     

                    I'm not a statistician but my guess is that with more than 25 years worth of usage world wide they're able to do a pretty decent job of crunching numbers to establish that claim.

                     

                    But like I said.  I'm not a statistician.

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                    "C" is for cookie.  That's good enough for me.

                      Ah!  So you *are* concerned about the zombie apocalypse! Big grin

                       

                      I'm not a statistician but my guess is that with more than 25 years worth of usage world wide they're able to do a pretty decent job of crunching numbers to establish that claim.

                       

                      But like I said.  I'm not a statistician.

                       

                      I was thinking that we would know more when the first children to have received the

                      vaccine 25 years ago reach >50 years of age. 

                      steph  

                       

                      OCD  If you don't laugh...   

                      cookiemonster


                      Connoisseur of Cookies

                        Not quite.  Once you have had chicken pox you can get shingles.  One doesn't have to be older than 50 to come down with it.  Yes, being older than 50 can be considered a risk factor.  But there are plenty of cases of people younger than 50 coming down with shingles.

                         

                        Also, there are enough data regarding shingles cases for a variety of age groups for a rate of occurrence to be known.  All it would take it 25+ years (if even that long) of comparison between vaccinated and unvaccinated groups to compare rates and establish efficacy of the vaccine as far as primary effectiveness (preventing chicken pox) and secondary effects (preventing shingles).

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                        "C" is for cookie.  That's good enough for me.

                          The efficacy of either vaccine is usually pretty well established prior to its licensure for use.  The FDA, while not perfect, is usually pretty particular about these kinds of things.

                           

                           

                          I'm having a very difficult time accepting that statement.  Why?  When my daughter got the vaccine in 2003 we were told in no uncertain terms it was good for life and she'd never get Chicken Pox.  Guess what; three years later she and every other kid in her 3rd grade class came down with Chicken Pox.  I'm thinking the powers that be didn't know dick about the efficacy of the vaccine when it was first introduced here in the United States.

                            The more I read here the more I'm inclined to avoid the shingles vaccine.

                            cookiemonster


                            Connoisseur of Cookies

                               

                              I'm having a very difficult time accepting that statement.  Why?  When my daughter got the vaccine in 2003 we were told in no uncertain terms it was good for life and she'd never get Chicken Pox.  Guess what; three years later she and every other kid in her 3rd grade class came down with Chicken Pox.  I'm thinking the powers that be didn't know dick about the efficacy of the vaccine when it was first introduced here in the United States.

                               

                              Your heathcare provider either lied to you, you misunderstood what was said or you chose to believe something other than what was said.  As I do not know you I'm not going to speculate which of the three possibilities took place.  If, as you said, every child in her class came down with chicken pox, there is always the possibility that there are other factors at play.  That being said, imagine how much worse it could have been if she *hadn't* received the vaccine.

                               

                              No vaccine is 100% effective 100% of the time.  This has been known for years.  It is also understood and built into the approval process.  That why, if you'll note, what I actually said was, "The FDA, while not perfect, is usually pretty particular about these things."

                               

                              With regards to the shingles vaccine, you're an adult and capable of making an informed decision about what you do for yourself.  I hope your reading is balanced with reputable sources and legitimate science and isn't limited to scare tactics and anecdotal nonsense.

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                              "C" is for cookie.  That's good enough for me.

                                 

                                Your heathcare provider either lied to you, you misunderstood what was said or you chose to believe something other than what was said.  As I do not know you I'm not going to speculate which of the three possibilities took place.  If, as you said, every child in her class came down with chicken pox, there is always the possibility that there are other factors at play.  That being said, imagine how much worse it could have been if she *hadn't* received the vaccine.

                                 

                                No vaccine is 100% effective 100% of the time.  This has been known for years.  It is also understood and built into the approval process.  That why, if you'll note, what I actually said was, "The FDA, while not perfect, is usually pretty particular about these things."

                                 

                                With regards to the shingles vaccine, you're an adult and capable of making an informed decision about what you do for yourself.  I hope your reading is balanced with reputable sources and legitimate science and isn't limited to scare tactics and anecdotal nonsense.

                                 

                                Regarding my daughter's vaccination, we discussed this with her pediatrician in New Jersey and again with her new pediatrician in New Hampshire, and they both came up with the same story, the CP vaccine is good for life, no boosters needed.  That was ten years ago, now, as I understand it, all health care professionals insist on a booster after some period of time.

                                 

                                As for the shingles vaccine for myself, I'm simply not seeing the benefit; I'm going to play the odds that I either won't get it again (assuming shingles is what I had last month), or if I do, it will be a mild case.

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