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YakTrax versus Kahtoola Microspikes (Read 107 times)

Anonymous Guest


Batgirl!

    So, I'm running 20 miles up to the top of Mt. Mitchell, NC end of February (and then 20 miles back down). There is a good chance there will be snow on the trails. I'm thinking about buying one or the other of these.

     

    Any good or bad feedback on either? Are either/both something that will fit in my vest pocket for the first few miles on road and then however miles on trails until I get to the snowy part (or the whole time if I'm lucky)? And are they something I can put on my shoes quickly and easily with nothing but a tree or rock to lean against? The micro spikes are more expensive, but get better reviews. But are heavier. Help? If it were up to me, I'd just do this in the summer. But the race is in February.

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      You won't want to run in the Microspikes on the road, unless there is significant snow/ice pack for them to bite into.  They are fantastic for trail running in the snow and ice.  Their ice traction is fantastic.  They are very easy to take on and off, and you can get a little pouch to carry them in so they won't rip up your gear.

       

      I have YakTrax Runs which I love for very icy road running.  I'd recommend them less for trails than the Microspikes.  These have carbide spikes in the front instead of the typical YakTrax coils.  On account of the velcro strap, they take a bit longer to go on/off than Microspikes.  Regular YakTrax (including the Pro and Walkers) that are coil-only don't add significantly to ice traction, and good luggy trail shoes are all I think you need for snow.

      "When a person trains once, nothing happens. When a person forces himself to do a thing a hundred or a thousand times, then he certainly has developed in more ways than physical. Is it raining? That doesn't matter. Am I tired? That doesn't matter, either. Then willpower will be no problem." 
      Emil Zatopek

        You won't want to run in the Microspikes on the road, unless there is significant snow/ice pack for them to bite into.  They are fantastic for trail running in the snow and ice.  Their ice traction is fantastic.  They are very easy to take on and off, and you can get a little pouch to carry them in so they won't rip up your gear.

         

        I have YakTrax Runs which I love for very icy road running.  I'd recommend them less for trails than the Microspikes.  These have carbide spikes in the front instead of the typical YakTrax coils.  On account of the velcro strap, they take a bit longer to go on/off than Microspikes.  Regular YakTrax (including the Pro and Walkers) that are coil-only don't add significantly to ice traction, and good luggy trail shoes are all I think you need for snow.

         

        Those spikes could be used for self defense.

          Most people up here use microspikes (or ice bugs or screw shoes or snowshoes) for various snow conditions - and they worked fine on the street ice the other day (almost 1/2in with water running on top). I carry mine on my waist belt or in pack when I don't need them. Easy on, easy off and don't compress toes like many other strap-on devices do. I resisted microspikes for a long time since they looked heavy and awkward. Then I found myself in an uncomfortable snow position (steep slope with only screw shoes on), bought the microspikes a few days later, and have kicked myself for not buying them earlier. The one problem I sometimes have is cold feet from the cold metal if out for many hours in subzero F (-10F give or take a few) - at least I think that's what's happening.

           

          If we've got snow, I'll generally just use trail shoes, but we've had a bunch of ice this winter (suppose we were due for it since we didn't have any last year with all the snow). Microspikes are what makes it possible to run on trails (or even roads a couple days ago) reasonably safely right now. The snow is lumpy and icy.

           

          The older Yaktrax are dangerous on ice like this. It sounds like the yaktrax runs have spikes up front which may help (haven't actually used them or seen them in action). The round smooth coils of the orignal yaktrax can't penetrate the ice, and you get a nice slide on your butt (while that's not my street, I've had conditions like that between my home and mailbox on city street, so 1st hand report) Yaktrax are ok for certain kinds of snow conditions, which we rarely get. (not sure where mine are even)

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