Light AND Cushioned (Read 652 times)

    I think one idea is that a large heel drop means a thicker heel = more heel strike. Also, it leads to chronically shortened Achilles / calves. Coming from someone addicted to his high-heel-drop shoes. But I will get there.

     

    I understand that radically changing a shoe types quickly (probably in any direction) can risk injury. That said, if one doesn't change shoe type and heel drop and just sticks with a thicker heel are they more at any more risk for injury than someone who sticks with lower drop?


    Carbs and Cabernet

      and Hokas.

       

      I am in love with Hoka Bondi. Very lightweight for such plush shoes (men's at 9.5 oz) , 4.5 drop. A little too wide for my narrow feet, but for me it is worth it switching to thicker socks. Winter is around the corner, anyway, no escape from thick socks...

       

      Next time you are in a running store, try them on - out of curiosity. For me it was love at first tentative, wobbly step (the sole IS thick)!

       

      My Kinvaras started disintegrating after 100 miles (a hole in the upper part). They are comfortable to run in, but as I get older, I  like something more cushioned than that.

      You either ran today or you didn't. (Nike)


      Feeling the growl again

         What I'm not understanding is reducing heel drop. Obviously it's one way to shed a little weight but does it make you faster or less prone to injury?

         

        I would challenge any advocate of it to produce data that it makes you faster.  I don't think I've ever seen someone seriously put forward that argument though.

         

        IMHO it's an "if it ain't broke don't fix it" proposition.  If you are doing just fine in "normal" shoes, I don't see why you would want to go through the change.  I can see if you've had lower leg issues and think that working on short calves might help somehow.

         

        With running in normal flats 1-2 times per week, I've never had issues wearing them in any distance race up to the marathon.  This spring I bought a new pair of flats to try (I've forgotten the name) and didn't do my research...they are a zero-drop flat.  While they felt fine in the store, they leave my calves sore in anything over 4-5 miles.  I'll just stick with my Adizeros, thanks.  Smile

        "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

         

          I think one idea is that a large heel drop means a thicker heel = more heel strike. Also, it leads to chronically shortened Achilles / calves. Coming from someone addicted to his high-heel-drop shoes. But I will get there.

           

          Are you addicted to high heels? Related to your "outfit" for a recent marathon?

          "If you have the fire, run..." -John Climacus

            Came across this. Some might find it helpful.

             

            Last night, I was reading Anatomy for Runners (Seriously, read that book.) and he had some sensible talk about the "minimalism" trend.

             

            He recommended starting with reducing the heel drop of your shoe by 50%. (e.g., moving from a 12mm drop to a 6-8 mm drop).  I'll admit that I'll have to look up the heel drop on my current shoe.  

             

            By the way, thanks to all the people who have mentioned this book around here recently (Anatomy for Runners by Jay Dicharry).  It really is worth a read.

             

            I've been having an internal debate on reducing the drop on my shoes.  I generally feel pretty happy with a mix of the Pegasus and Wave Precision for day-to-day, but I have been having some minor ankle and calf issues recently and am otherwise tempted to move to something a bit lighter.  Of course, some people say *not* to mess with your heel drop if you've been having calf issues, but I can't see what the benefit is supposed to be to me if I'm not having some kind of problem with traditional shoes.  I picked up some Kinvaras on liquidation at Running Warehouse a little while back (around 50 miles in them) and haven't really decided how I feel about them.  I do feel faster in them, but I have no doubt that's the weight and not anything to do with the heel drop.  I sometimes (irrationally?) think the shoes are trying too hard to artificially move me to a midfoot strike rather than just having the drop that they have and letting my foot go however it wants to go. (I'm a mild heel striker.  I'm pretty sure I do not overstride, at least not in any appreciable amount.)

              New shoe report.

               

              Went into the running store today and asked for a lighter replacement for my army of lunar glides. I'm not a minimalist and don't care to be. I like a little support, about a 1cm drop, cushion, and a bit of a lively ride. I wanted something a little lighter. There were lots at the same weight as my lunar glides but I ended up finding something lighter and walked out with a pair of adizero tempo 6. On the scale they are the same as my lunar flyknits (10oz for a 12 1/2). They passed the first run test but boy are they loud and ugly. Give me about a week and see if I'm still eager to pull them out of the rotation.

               


              Feeling the growl again

                New shoe report.

                 

                Went into the running store today and asked for a lighter replacement for my army of lunar glides. I'm not a minimalist and don't care to be. I like a little support, about a 1cm drop, cushion, and a bit of a lively ride. I wanted something a little lighter. There were lots at the same weight as my lunar glides but I ended up finding something lighter and walked out with a pair of adizero tempo 6. On the scale they are the same as my lunar flyknits (10oz for a 12 1/2). They passed the first run test but boy are they loud and ugly. Give me about a week and see if I'm still eager to pull them out of the rotation.

                 

                 

                I've been told you're just boring if you don't like clown shoes. Smile

                 

                Please update after some experience, I'm interested in this one.  Thanks.

                "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                 

                   

                  I've been told you're just boring if you don't like clown shoes. Smile

                   

                  Please update after some experience, I'm interested in this one.  Thanks.

                   

                  Me, too.

                  "If you have the fire, run..." -John Climacus

                    Please update after some experience, I'm interested in this one.  Thanks.

                    Me three, please. Smile

                    “Everything you need is already inside.” -- Bill Bowerman

                      You wanted lights and well cushioned, right? Sketchers has got just what you need:

                       

                        Ha, perfect for early-morning hiking. Thanks.

                        "If you have the fire, run..." -John Climacus

                          I have the new Adidas Boston 4s. Pretty light, neutral, firm cushion. Kinda like the Tempo but the Tempo has a little medial post.

                           

                          I run in both standard heel (Bostons) and 4mm drops (GoRun, Kinvara). Also some 7mm drops (Adios, Hyperspeed). I don't think the higher heel of the Boston makes me heel strike. I hit the ground the same way. It's just a bit more shoe for when I feel like a bit more shoe. It's the heaviest, bulkiest shoe I have at about 10 oz in size 10 /12.

                           

                            I'm now alternating among 4 different shoes, Kinvara4, Pureflow2, Altra Instinct 1.5 and my newest, Altra Torin. They are all pretty light and best of all, low (or no) drop and no significant medial post. (PF is completely gone, yay!) The Torin definitely have the most cushioning. Wearing any of the others is not bad, but I can definitely feel some stress from the road after 10 miles or so, while the Torins are more isolating. Unfortunately, they seem to run smaller than the Instinct and my toes don't have as much room to spread out. Overall, the instincts are the most comfortable but they seem to have a very "dead" feel, as if the sole absorbs my energy and doesn't give it back. They make me feel slow when I'm running. The Pureflow2 are the fastest of the bunch, hugging my feet very nicely and seeming to be light and responsive. Kinvara2's are my slightly least favorite of the four, since they squeeze my toes the most and I have fairly wide feet.

                             

                            I just recieved a pair of Kinvara 4 from Runningwarehouse last night.  Put the right shoe on and immediately took it off and put it back in the box.  They are going back.  Way too narrow in the forefoot for me,  Too bad cuz they look really cool and that's pretty important.  I also have a pair of Altra Instinct that fit me just perfectly but, like Northernman, they don't feel like 'fast' shoes so I never race in them despite their light weight and excellent fit.

                            Anyway, just wanted to put that piece of data out there ... wide feet = not good for Kinvara 4. 

                            I did find a place on Amazon selling, I guess, some leftover ASCS Gel Tarthers which I really like for long distance racing.  I've burned through two pairs of them in the last couple years.   I went ahead and bought two more pairs.  Should hold me for a couple years of HM and M racing.

                              Does anyone happen to know if the Kinvara 4's run narrower in the toebox than the Kinvara 3's?  I love my Kinvara 3's, and had planned on the Kinvara 4 as my next purchase, but I have struggled with narrow toeboxes in other shoes in the past.

                                Does anyone happen to know if the Kinvara 4's run narrower in the toebox than the Kinvara 3's?  I love my Kinvara 3's, and had planned on the Kinvara 4 as my next purchase, but I have struggled with narrow toeboxes in other shoes in the past.

                                Every review I've seen says the toe box on the K4 is roomier than the K3. According to Runblogger, Saucony said it's not wider but it's deeper Top to bottom.  Same last.