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Shoe suggestions for a pronater (Read 915 times)

    First, there is no real running store within a few hours of me, so I have pretty much been on my own to find the right shoes. I have been running in Nimbus 9's since they came out, and before that I wore the 8's. On the Asics website, it shows that they can handle moderate pronation. They seemed fine until I started running long runs of 10 miles. I'm really not sure if it's the shoes, but I just have an achiness in my legs. When I first start a run, my shins hurt, then get better after a mile or so. I plugged my info into the Shoe Dog on RRS, and it gave me a long list of shoes. I tried the Gel Kayanos, but they just didn't feel quite right. The NB 992's felt pretty good, but I didn't buy them yet. Academy didn't carry many of the shoes suggested, and I don't want to order shoes online without trying them on first. All the shoes listed were stability-- I thought I might just need motion control. I have high arches, but over pronate, which I guess isn't really the "norm". So does anyone run in the 992's? I know everyone is different, but I just need some kind of feedback. I'm kind of lost.

    HF #8206

     

      Well, the Nimbus is a Neutral shoe and when you tell people you're over-pronating, they often tend to recommend Motion Control shoes. Given that you're in a Neutral and have high arches, I would recommend you consider anything rated as a Stability shoe (which I think the NB 992 is). This will be a less dramatic change, but will give you support. A Motion Control shoe is a big difference from a Neutral shoe. The Nimbus says it can handle "moderate" pronation, because most runner pronate. What you're concerned about it over-pronation. I think because you have high arches, most online surveys will say you shouldn't do Motion Control, and I'd say that's probably right. It's a shame you didn't like the Kayano, as that's definitely the logical recommendation for someone in the Nimbus looking for a bit more support. Aside from that, though, I'd focus in on Stability-rated shoes - eliminate all Neutrals and Motion Controls - and go on fit. All of that being said -- there are many ways to see if you overpronate... Stand with your toes pointing straight forward and see how much your knees turn in, for instance. Or look at the wear pattern. I also find that if I start my runs too fast, my knees ache a bit, too. Or if run on pavement too many days in a row, etc.

      Go to http://certainintelligence.blogspot.com for my blog.

        Marcus--thanks. I appreciate the advice.

        HF #8206

         

          So does anyone run in the 992's? I know everyone is different, but I just need some kind of feedback. I'm kind of lost.
          I ran in the prior 991 model. These are older model New Balance but you might want to check them out at www.6pm.com. -New Balance 1222 (9/18/08 - $58.36, Higher end stability model) -New Balance 767 (9/18/08 - $55.20) -New Balance 902 (9/18/08 - $63.25, Performance Stability aka thinner sole I think) Looking to save more money go to www.fatwallet.com and www.evreward.com

          Vim

            Thanks, Modal!

            HF #8206

             

              Also don't limit yourself to just the woman's version of a particular shoe.... if you want to save money. Male 767 at 6pm is 35 bucks dang. I might buy a pair!

              Vim

                Also don't limit yourself to just the woman's version of a
                Good idea!

                HF #8206

                 


                The young Mama Bear!

                  You see, I'm the opposite of you...I've got flat feet and am generally neutral (my right foot overpronates mildly). I wear the Kayanos, and I was going to suggest them, but you didn't like them. How much do you overpronate? You can film yourself while running from behind, or have someone watch you. Secondly, do you KNOW you overpronate? Just because your shins hurt doesn't mean you might need to upgrade to a heftier shoe. My knees hurt when I was running in Brooks Addictions and I downgraded, even though one of my feet overpronate. Other than that, I second the suggestion to upgrade slightly and not all the way to a MC shoe. That way, your feet don't hate you so much. Wink ETA: Ooo, have you considered an orthotic insert?
                  Couch to 5K support group! Short-term goals: - Sub 35 5K - Complete my 16-week 10K training plan.
                  Long term goals: - Sub 30 5K. - Compete in a 5K. - Train for a triathlon. - Compete in a 10K.
                    I definitely overpronate--no question. But this evening on my run, I tried changing my stride a little. I read somewhere about not coming down on your heels, but more on your toes. I did this, and I think it might actually help me. The run felt pretty darn good--I got 4 easy miles in, and I'm not feeling any pain in my legs. I'm going to go on my long run Saturday in my Nimbuses and see how it goes. Also, I ran without the Superfeet inserts that I have been using. I think I really need the cushioning, and the Superfeet feel kind of hard to me. At first I thought I was going to like them, but now I'm not so sure. Thanks so much for all the input, everyone.

                    HF #8206

                     


                    2010 Goofy Trainee

                      First of all, be careful when you attempt to alter your stride. Every time I attempt to do that I end up hurting an entirely new part of my feet or legs. I too am an overpronator with high arches. But I severely overpronate. I use custom orthotics which accomodate the arch, and motion control+ shoes for the pronation, even though I'm not that heavy in weight. If you didn't like the Kayanos, you might want to try the 2130's. They are light stability shoes but I found them to be extremely comfortable. You'll probably have to experiment to find the right combination of insoles + shoes. A good way to check on the pronation is to look at the wear pattern on the soles - if it is even you are probably wearing the right shoes. But on the other hand, if all you feel are achy legs after 10 miles, that's not so bad. You can apply ice to your shins after every run to relieve some of that pain, and possibly try running on a softer surface. Don't make any radical changes if you don't have to.
                      Turn off your mind, relax, and float downstream...
                        Thanks for the input, sdewan. Smile

                        HF #8206

                         


                        Insert witty title here

                          I ran in the prior 991 model. These are older model New Balance but you might want to check them out at www.6pm.com. -New Balance 1222 (9/18/08 - $58.36, Higher end stability model) -New Balance 767 (9/18/08 - $55.20) -New Balance 902 (9/18/08 - $63.25, Performance Stability aka thinner sole I think) Looking to save more money go to www.fatwallet.com and www.evreward.com
                          It's been about 8 years (holy crap, am I that old?! Shocked) since I worked at a New Balance store, but I don't remember the 991 being a motion control shoe. The 1120 (1122's now I think) were the holy grail of motion control that wouldn't let you pronate or supinate and also looked like a "special" shoe. There were some shoes that provided mild motion control all around like the 1050 series. The 750 series I think were for pronaters and I can't remember the number for those who supinate. But that was a long time ago so that could be all wrong too. Big grin They also have lots of new models that didn't exist then.

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                          The young Mama Bear!

                            I definitely overpronate--no question. But this evening on my run, I tried changing my stride a little. I read somewhere about not coming down on your heels, but more on your toes. I did this, and I think it might actually help me. The run felt pretty darn good--I got 4 easy miles in, and I'm not feeling any pain in my legs. I'm going to go on my long run Saturday in my Nimbuses and see how it goes. Also, I ran without the Superfeet inserts that I have been using. I think I really need the cushioning, and the Superfeet feel kind of hard to me. At first I thought I was going to like them, but now I'm not so sure.
                            Ah, so you're a heel striker. I know that some "good" runners do it, but I generally would advise people not to do it (not that I'm some amazing runner as it is, but you know.) That is probably where your leg pain comes from - the impact from the heel going straight up your leg. I've never tried them, but I hear they're great. Overall, I'd tell you that if your run in the Nimbuses doesn't go well and continues to do so, upgrade to a guidance shoe. I really do think that it's the way you strike, though. I hope everything works out!
                            Couch to 5K support group! Short-term goals: - Sub 35 5K - Complete my 16-week 10K training plan.
                            Long term goals: - Sub 30 5K. - Compete in a 5K. - Train for a triathlon. - Compete in a 10K.
                              Thanks, Goddess! I ran 11 miles yesterday, and it went pretty well. I think I will be able to stay with the Nimbuses. I really do believe it was the heel striking.

                              HF #8206