1

Do I need new shoes? (Read 223 times)

cbennett926


Trust Me, Im an Engineer

    So, I have a pair of LunarGlide 3's. I haven't put more than 200 miles on them, but they are well over a year and a half old. The tread has little, if at all, wear on the bottom, but they feel kinda stiff. So, even though they aren't really that worn, just a little stiff, should I get new ones cause of their age?

    Not all those who wander are lost - JRR Tolkien

     

    Philliefan33


      Big grin

      The answer to that question is always "yes"

      Future Races:

      5/4/14:  Bucks County Ten Miler

      cbennett926


      Trust Me, Im an Engineer

        Big grin

        The answer to that question is always "yes"

         

        I thought so!

         

        Are the Nike Free's anygood for distance running with those who have natural feet and mild supination!?

        Not all those who wander are lost - JRR Tolkien

         

          Unless, of course, you are like me.  I just retired a pair of Brooks Addiction shoes at 3053.2 miles.  The sole was worn down to the cushion.  This is annoying because my new pair of Brooks Addiction shoes is less comfortable than the old pair.

           

          Now, if I was a REAL runner, I would have a large rack full of shoes.....

            I thought so!

             

            Are the Nike Free's anygood for distance running with those who have natural feet and mild supination!?

            I'm actually kinda getting a mixed message here.  Nike Free, which is SUPPOSED to emulate "barefoot" running, which, personally, they have too much cushion anyways, but for someone who are thinking about running in Free (unless you're just going with the flow...) and be concerned with possibly minimal cushion loss...which, to me, is like; might as well as long as there is some weird wear or deformation of the foam.  I'm a minimalist, pretty much run all over the place in the racing flats, and I usually won't even worry about "cushion loss" at all and, if anything, I'm more concerned with the "spine" of the shoe going too soft (it's called "shank").

             

            Personally, for someone who's trying to run in Free, Lunar is waaaaaay too soft and cushiony and, if anything, that losing some cushioning would work better for you.

            cbennett926


            Trust Me, Im an Engineer

              I'm actually kinda getting a mixed message here.  Nike Free, which is SUPPOSED to emulate "barefoot" running, which, personally, they have too much cushion anyways, but for someone who are thinking about running in Free (unless you're just going with the flow...) and be concerned with possibly minimal cushion loss...which, to me, is like; might as well as long as there is some weird wear or deformation of the foam.  I'm a minimalist, pretty much run all over the place in the racing flats, and I usually won't even worry about "cushion loss" at all and, if anything, I'm more concerned with the "spine" of the shoe going too soft (it's called "shank").

               

              Personally, for someone who's trying to run in Free, Lunar is waaaaaay too soft and cushiony and, if anything, that losing some cushioning would work better for you.

              I've looked at my old shoes and it seems like for some reason I keep getting more and more cushion, and I have no idea why...

               

              I just (literally just) finished a run in my current walk around town shoes (Nike Free's which is why I'm considering getting them as trainers) and lo' and behold my ankle pain that I always seem to have after running in my Lunar's is gone!

               

              So, Free's or Kirvana's (whatever Mizuno calls them) it is!

              Not all those who wander are lost - JRR Tolkien

               

                You've got to realize that; the softer the sole (of the shoe), the less stable it would become.  Same thing; the closer to the ground you are, the more stable you'll be.  A lot of so-called "running-related injuries" are caused by shoes that'll get you too far off the ground as well as the shoe that's so cushy.

                I've looked at my old shoes and it seems like for some reason I keep getting more and more cushion, and I have no idea why...

                 

                I just (literally just) finished a run in my current walk around town shoes (Nike Free's which is why I'm considering getting them as trainers) and lo' and behold my ankle pain that I always seem to have after running in my Lunar's is gone!

                 

                So, Free's or Kirvana's (whatever Mizuno calls them) it is!

                cbennett926


                Trust Me, Im an Engineer

                  You've got to realize that; the softer the sole (of the shoe), the less stable it would become.  Same thing; the closer to the ground you are, the more stable you'll be.  A lot of so-called "running-related injuries" are caused by shoes that'll get you too far off the ground as well as the shoe that's so cushy.

                   

                  So in theory are the high supportive shoes I have been running in, be the culprit to my injuries?

                   

                  Just out of curiosity is there any information I can read up on this that isn't overly biased? Most minimialist/barefoot literature and articles I read tend to lean one way, same goes with "pro-shoes" articles.

                  Not all those who wander are lost - JRR Tolkien

                   

                  tracilynn


                  On shin transplant list

                    Ive been running a year and 4 months and I am guessing all but 3 months of that have been spent in pain or injured.  I have had ITBS 4 times! Shin splints bad once and minor once & peroneal tendon injury in foot. I have been to PT, have done all the exercises and I keep getting hurt.

                     

                    I was told I am a severe over pronator and was put in stability shoes from the beginning.  My doc also said I had inward rotating ankles and high arches and also needed a custom orthotic.  The orthotic is massive (its raised over an inch) and then I put those in my big ol stability shoes.    After getting ITB the 4th time (3 weeks ago) I was about to quit running altogether but a friend told me to ditch my bulky shoes and try minimal/barefoot.  What do I have to lose? So I ditched them. Ditched the orthotic too.

                     

                    I took 5 days off running to let my ITB calm back down.  I bought some 4mm drop shoes (kinvaras minimum side of neutral).  I dropped my miles down and at the end of my runs I take off my shoes n socks and run for 1/2 mile barefoot (just to focus on proper landing). Its only been a couple weeks so far so who knows whats gonna happen but its going really well!   My ITB has improved thats for sure.  Its still tight but Im not in pain.

                     

                    Good luck to you figuring it outCool

                    ~~~~~~~

                    Traci

                     

                    tracilynn


                    On shin transplant list



                      Oh, and what are your injuries?  Im curious

                      ~~~~~~~

                      Traci

                       

                      cbennett926


                      Trust Me, Im an Engineer



                        Oh, and what are your injuries?  Im curious

                         

                        The inside of my ankles become inflamed and I get Posterior Tibial Tendonitis REALLY bad Sad
                        When I was in highschool I got the problem from overuse (ran more than my coach told me to, eh stupid high school kids right?) and it was so bad it hurt to walk (thought if I ran more I'd get faster). I've since learned from my mistake, but evidently am still paying for it. I went to a foot doctor and was told it was just tendonitis and told me to take alleve

                        Not all those who wander are lost - JRR Tolkien

                         

                          Traci:

                           

                          Most doctors, and whoever told you about over-pronation, most likely look at the issue, or most likely symptom of the issue (very much less likely "cause"), in a very static way.  Seriously, what would "very high arch" prove?  I'm in a process right now of collecting some pictures of runners clearly pronating.  Pronation is a natural movement.  You're supposed to pronate.  Of course there is a degree of it; some people DO overly pronate and could cause some problems.  But they are actually minority.  More people get hurt by trying artificially to prevent your feet from pronating.  Some, not all, orthotics are for that.  So are stability shoes.  Putting both of them together, as you did, is pretty much a double-whammy!

                           

                          Some stability shoes, if you slip them on and stand naturally, you can feel your feet being pushed outwardly (laterally).  Same with some rigid orthotics.  You stand on them naturally and you'll feel your feet/legs being pushed outwardly.  Where you'll get most stress would be lateral side of your ankle AND lateral side of your knee--IT band.  The term ITBS was almost non-existant in the 1970s.  Granted, not as many people were running back then; but shoes were a lot more simpler and actually more balanced.  It's the same thing I've mentioned earlier; the closer you are from the ground, the more stable you'll become.  The more bulky your shoes become, the more restrictive they'll be to your actual functional movement of your feet.  In other words, you'll be running slower; and you'll be putting more stress to your feet.  You have, what, 26 bones and 33 joints (or something like that) in your feet.  We have those joints in our body for a reason.

                          Ive been running a year and 4 months and I am guessing all but 3 months of that have been spent in pain or injured.  I have had ITBS 4 times! Shin splints bad once and minor once & peroneal tendon injury in foot. I have been to PT, have done all the exercises and I keep getting hurt.

                           

                          I was told I am a severe over pronator and was put in stability shoes from the beginning.  My doc also said I had inward rotating ankles and high arches and also needed a custom orthotic.  The orthotic is massive (its raised over an inch) and then I put those in my big ol stability shoes.    After getting ITB the 4th time (3 weeks ago) I was about to quit running altogether but a friend told me to ditch my bulky shoes and try minimal/barefoot.  What do I have to lose? So I ditched them. Ditched the orthotic too.

                           

                          I took 5 days off running to let my ITB calm back down.  I bought some 4mm drop shoes (kinvaras minimum side of neutral).  I dropped my miles down and at the end of my runs I take off my shoes n socks and run for 1/2 mile barefoot (just to focus on proper landing). Its only been a couple weeks so far so who knows whats gonna happen but its going really well!   My ITB has improved thats for sure.  Its still tight but Im not in pain.

                           

                          Good luck to you figuring it outCool


                          delicate flower

                            Unless, of course, you are like me.  I just retired a pair of Brooks Addiction shoes at 3053.2 miles.  The sole was worn down to the cushion.  This is annoying because my new pair of Brooks Addiction shoes is less comfortable than the old pair.

                             

                            Now, if I was a REAL runner, I would have a large rack full of shoes.....

                             

                            Heh, I retire my BICYCLES before they reach that many miles.  Big grin

                            roboknee.