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TheDroppingDead


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      First of all:  welcome to running and RA!

      As far as the pain in the foot, my first instinct is to check your lacing.  It could possibly be too tight.  I've always laced my shoes like this:  http://lydiardfoundation.org/training/lacingthelydiardway.aspx, and it always seems to help.  

      I'll let the more experienced people try and figure out any other causes.  

      'No matter how slow you go, you're still lapping everyone on the couch'

       

      "Running is a big question mark that's there each and every day. It asks you, 'Are you going to be a wimp or are you going to be strong today?'"  - Peter Maher

       

      "Running long and hard is an ideal antidepressant, since it's hard to run and feel sorry for yourself at the same time. Also, there are those hours of clearheadedness that follow a long run."  -Monte Davis

        I would highly recommend not pushing through it. When an injury/discomfort starts to worsen throughout the run it's a sign that something is wrong...and getting worse.

         

        General rule is that is the pain isn't severe and improves or stays the same you can generally run through it, but if it increases stopping is wise. Much better to cut a 6 miler short and take a day or two off to rest it, than do serious damage and lose two months.

         

        As to the injury itself, check what keeponrunning said, and make sure your shoes are "set up" similarly. Another thing to try is going for a run in the old shoes and see if the pain is still around, sometimes certain shoes just don't work well for certain people and gaits. 

        They say golf is like life, but don't believe them. Golf is more complicated than that. "If I am still standing at the end of the race, hit me with a Board and knock me down, because that means I didn't run hard enough" If a lot of people gripped a knife and fork the way they do a golf club, they'd starve to death. "Don't fear moving slowly forward...fear standing still."


        Obligatory runner.

          Hey! Yeah, it's not good to run through pain like that when you're just starting out (or ever, really). It can become a lot worse and eventually keep you from running. Shoes/lacing are a good first place to look for the source of the problem.

           

          The other thing I would add is that if you literally just started running last Monday, then running 6-8 miles at a time is quite a lot. Your body needs time to adjust to running - muscles and ligaments need the time, even if your lungs have no problem with that distance. If you weren't running much before but are very fit from some other form of exercise, this may be a case of your foot going "wtf is this...?"  I would dial back the distance to 2-3 miles at a time, every other day, or at least doing a combination of walking and running for the first month.

           

          Good luck!

            Hey! Yeah, it's not good to run through pain like that when you're just starting out (or ever, really). It can become a lot worse and eventually keep you from running. Shoes/lacing are a good first place to look for the source of the problem.

             

            The other thing I would add is that if you literally just started running last Monday, then running 6-8 miles at a time is quite a lot. Your body needs time to adjust to running - muscles and ligaments need the time, even if your lungs have no problem with that distance. If you weren't running much before but are very fit from some other form of exercise, this may be a case of your foot going "wtf is this...?"  I would dial back the distance to 2-3 miles at a time, every other day, or at least doing a combination of walking and running for the first month.

             

            Good luck!

             

            +1, and additionally, you are probably running too fast.  Take your current best time for the mile and multiply by the square root of 2 (no, I'm not kidding, that is about the midpoint for easy running pace in the calculators)  to get your minutes/mile pace for these runs.  Half an hour, every other day, for the next few months, would get you to an excellent starting point for further endurance and speed conditioning, and won't detract from your ability to do workouts related to the other physical fitness tests.

            2013 H1:  7 hours/week base.  Q3: Train for goal race.  Q4:  Goal Race.

            TheDroppingDead


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                If I'm not smart about how I tie my shoes the exact same thing happens to me regardless of how long I have been running in the specific pair of sneakers.  I can't tie the laces to tight or this happens, so it's kind of a more "medium" type tightness.  Sort of hard to describe.  Also, you may want to try Dri Fit socks (if you haven't already) to solve for the blisters.  You can pick them up at Marshalls or TJ Max (cheaper) and they will be worth the investment.  That seems to really help me with blisters.  If all else fails, try body glide on your feet.  I do that sometimes on my long runs and it helps.  I almost never get blisters on my feet anymore. 

                  Where in your foot is the pain?  Pain in the ball of the foot is different from pain in the arch area is different from pain in the heel is different from pain in the top of the foot is different from pain in ..... 

                   

                  And take it easy.  Your legs may be capable of running 6 to 8 miles per day from the start, but your feet are not.  Yet.  They will be if you take it easy until you find the cause. 


                  12-week layoff

                    Do you have a track or cross-country program at your school? Even if you are not on the team, you may try asking the coach for some advice; teachers and coaches usually love helping kids out. If you are getting blisters, you may try wearing two thin pairs of socks.
                    TheDroppingDead


                        There are different types of "pain"--some of them can be a bud of injury, others may simply be a discomfort simply because you're not used to it; in other words, a growing pain.  Some may be a sign of something that needs to be corrected.  This can be something like too much slapping when you land.  I have no idea what sort of ASICS shoes you wear, what kind of running form you have, what sort of surface you run on...  In other words, too many unknown factors to assess anything.  

                         

                        If you're starting out, there's always some sort of "growing pains".  I do not have any idea what you mean by "tiredness" or "achingness" that actually goes away when you stop running.  Sounds a lot like you are just slapping around too much and abusing your feet more than necessary and, the fact it doesn't seem to bother you when you stop running sort of indicates that it's not even a bug of injury.  The fact that you tend to tie your shoes too tight indicates to me that your shoes is one or two sizes too large.  If the shoe doesn't fit your foot, you have to get it too large to force the unfitted area of the foot to be forced in.  But what then happens is all the rest of the foot slide around in the over-sized shoe and, in order to stop that, you tend to tie it too tight.  Remember blister is caused from over-heat as well as RUBBING.  Chances are, your shoe is too large and your foot is sliding around inside the shoe and that's why you're getting a blister underneath the base of the big toe.

                         

                        I have no idea what this "gray stripe" with ASICS shoes you're talking about--almost all my shoes are ASICS and I wonder if you are talking about those gray/silver dots in the medial side of the shoe???  That's just a fitting thingie and shouldn't affect much to hurting your foot.  Or maybe you are talking about the reinforcement material inside the shoe to hold up the arch.  Once again, if the shoe doesn't really fit--meaning that if the SHAPE of the shoe doesn't really match the shape of your foot, problems would occur.  Most people pick the shoe based on so-called "stability-neutral-cushion" system and very few even pay attention to the actual shape of the shoe.  If the shoe doesn't fit, then they'll just go ahead and pick up the shoe that's a size or two bigger which, as I said earlier, actually contributes to more problems.

                          ...Take your current best time for the mile and multiply by the square root of 2 (no, I'm not kidding, that is about the midpoint for easy running pace in the calculators)  to get your minutes/mile pace for these runs...

                          Where did you get this formula?  I'm impressed!!  This is not bad at all!!

                            . I also noticed, that my Asics Brand Shoes has a Grey Stripe in the Middle, where the arch of the foot. Does that have to do with anything?

                             

                             

                            is it a thick stripe & on the side of shoe where the arch of your foot is?    could be the medial post for pronation control & more support.  which would make the shoe a stability shoe.

                            andyman68


                              Thanks Everyone! And yes I do believe I am probably running too far to begin with. BUT I can run that far. The only thing I did notice from this soreness was how tight I tie my shoe. I tie them really tight, because I get this blister right below the "ball" looking thing underneath my big toe. I have no idea what this blister is coming from. I tried new shoes and even foot powder. I tie my shoes tight because of it, and maybe that is why I get this aching/tired/soreness feeling ONLY when I run. I also noticed, that my Asics Brand Shoes has a Grey Stripe in the Middle, where the arch of the foot. Does that have to do with anything?

                               

                              I second the Body Glide or similar product in the area to prevent the blister.  That's what we use for running ultras and it works.  I've used it up to 100 miles and no problems.  I would avoid tying the shoes too tightly since that could cause the aching.  As you get used to running hopefully the aching will go away.  There is  running form to consider.  

                               

                              I would keep running unless the pain starts to worsen.

                               

                              Andy

                              "Any idiot can run a marathon. It takes a special kind of idiot to run an ultramarathon." - Alan Cabelly
                              TheDroppingDead


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