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Constant shin pain while running. (Read 162 times)

Jabenev


    Hi folks,

     

    Let me give you a little background real quick:

    I'm a 25 year old male who just got into running about a month ago. I'm currently 5'6" and 150lbs and started running to feel more energetic and lose a little bit of weight. I've weighed 125lbs for about 8 years, but have gained about 25lbs the past couple of years due to working in IT (sitting at a computer all day). I eat pretty healthy - cut out soda and fast food; greatly reduced the amount of red meats; I juice pretty regularly and drink plenty of water.

    About a month ago, I went to a local running store and was fitted for proper running shoes and inserts. The workers there noticed that I have pretty substantial pronation in my gait, so the shoes/inserts they fitted me for are designed to help counter that.

    I've been doing the couch to 5k program and every time I run, my shins will start hurting almost immediately. Physically, I feel like I have the endurance to run around 10 miles or so, but with the shin pain, I have to stop after maybe 0.5 of a mile (on good days I can push myself to do a mile). Last night I went three miles on the treadmill, doing one mile of running, then alternating 0.5 miles walking/running the rest of the time.

    Is there anything in particular I should be doing to remedy my shin splints? I stretch before every run with a focus on my shins and calfs and I pay attention to how my feet are landing during runs, but the pain doesn't seem to be stopping.

     

    Any tips?

    FlatFT.runner


      I'm a heavy overpronantor and have worn custom orthotics most of the years running I had shin problems very bad. Now you can have the shin problems from many things, to much to soon, shoes , at least those apply to me.

        Get fit for shoes as you may be running in shoes that do not fit your gait\pronation. Also make sure they are new  higher quality running shoes and not some cheap Wal-Mart type shoe. I had shin splints really bad when I started running and stretched alot, changed shoes and when I ran on the treadmill, I ran with a slight inclined and they eventually went away.

         

        The pain that hurts the worse is the imagined pain. One of the most difficult arts of racing is learning to ignore the imagined pain and just live with the present pain (which is always bearable.) - Jeff

         

        2014 Goals:

         

        Stay healthy

        Enjoy life

         

          I had bad shin splints when I first started running. Stretching helps. Calf raises help.  After a time, they went away. I think it's pretty common with new runners.

           

           

           


          Roadrunner's Apprentice

            I had that pretty bad the first several months I started running also.  A friend suggested focusing on my stride:  a short stride and mid-foot strike instead of a heel strike, plus increasing my steps/minute (cadence).  Once I did all that my pain problems went away.  I also find stretching my calves beforehand helps.

            2014 Goals:

            - sub-26 5K : sub-56 10K : 1st half marathon

            - Tell my excuses to shut up and lace up...

              do toe taps 2 or 3 times a day while sitting at that computer gig.  balance out the muscles pulling on your shin (yes, you have tiny ones on the front).

               

              it may not go away fully for a year or two but you can get it to where it's a rare problem.  with anything, if you feel true pain, don't run.

               

              if you want, try wetting a small towel and microwave it for 20 seconds.  put the warm towel on your shins.  stretch.  then run.  after running apply ice.

               

              you can take ibuprofen.  but it's better if you can cope without relying on regular intake of ibuprofen.

              In an infinite universe, the one thing sentient life cannot afford to have is a sense of proportion

              http://htwins.net/scale2/scale2.swf?bordercolor=white&fb_source=message

               

               

               


              Roadrunner's Apprentice

                Keep in mind you're also building strength in the lower leg muscles that likely haven't been worked much.  There are a lot of fine muscles down there and after you've been running a while you'll really see the definition.

                 

                Early on, basic remedies like ice packs, using Icy Hot or similar rub beforehand, and ibuprofen helped get me through it.

                2014 Goals:

                - sub-26 5K : sub-56 10K : 1st half marathon

                - Tell my excuses to shut up and lace up...

                Jabenev


                  Thanks a lot everyone. I'll definitely give the hot towel/icy hot before running a try. I don't think it's my shoes because I spend about 45 minutes at the local running store getting analyzed, foot scanned, fitted for several shoes, and running in them all. The pain is slightly better than when I first started, so I'm betting I just need to keep at it and overtime I'll strengthen up my shins.


                  Not quite right

                    I have had them bad for months at times have managed to work them out for the most part. Most of what everyone has stated plus I foam roll mine out and massage them couple times a day.


                    Mostly Harmless

                      I had that pretty bad the first several months I started running also.  A friend suggested focusing on my stride:  a short stride and mid-foot strike instead of a heel strike, plus increasing my steps/minute (cadence).  Once I did all that my pain problems went away.  I also find stretching my calves beforehand helps.

                       

                      This. I'm not a big proponent of barefoot running but it can be very useful.  Go to a nice grassy field (a football or soccer field is perfect) and run for a few minutes. You will revert to a shorter stride almost at once. Pay very close attention to how that feels. Then put your shoes back on and run like that.

                       "Address the process rather than the outcome.
                      Then, the outcome becomes more likely." - Robert Fripp


                      Loves the outdoors

                        Try running outside and see if things improve. I get pains on the TM that I never ever get outside as my stride must change somehow on the TM.

                        One day I decided I wanted to become a runner, so I did.

                          Few things you can try: different shoes without all the inserts, different TM at the gym, try outdoor, slow down and shin strengthening exercise.

                          adavis58


                            After running use an ice pack on your shins that can help.

                            Try eating a banana every day, that can help. Sounds crazy but it seemed to help me when I first started running.

                            do proper stretches before running.

                            Art

                             

                            http://fitatfifty-art.blogspot.com/


                            justrundan

                               

                              This. I'm not a big proponent of barefoot running but it can be very useful.  Go to a nice grassy field (a football or soccer field is perfect) and run for a few minutes. You will revert to a shorter stride almost at once. Pay very close attention to how that feels. Then put your shoes back on and run like that.

                              Changing my stride was what cured that problem for me.  I started out 2 years ago, trying to get in shape on the TM.  As in past attempts, I got pain in anterior leg muscles (not the shin itself) and was about ready to give up again.  Then I read about changing my stride, as several above have mentioned.  Once I got used to shorter stride, striking forefoot/midfoot range, it all went away.  Try that, I think you'll be pleasantly surprised.

                              Dan

                               

                               

                               

                               

                              robinde


                                I think the shorter stride advice is good advice.  I get shin pain when I do speed work.  I think I over stride in an effort to go faster.  Also, putting your treadmill on an incline might help.  I used to get shin pain on the TM and since I keep it at 1% or more now, I don't have pain.

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