1

Measuring Your Level of Fatigue or Level of Recovery (Read 585 times)

    1.  First, does anyone know of a way to quantify your level of fatigue? 

     

    I.e. you answer some questions about your level of fatigue and it gives you a score?  Something someone can use to determine if they need more rest, if they should skip the hard work, or they should not increase their weekly mileage?

    I envision the system were you would answer questions about your level of fatigue.  For me that indicators I can think of are;  

    • Calf Tightness
    • Body Tiredness
    • Effort of Last Workout
    • Quality of Last Workout
    • Effort of Last 7 Days of Workouts
    • Days since Last Break (Rest Period)
    • Hydration Level
    • Quality of Sleep
    • Quality of Nutrition
    • Fatigue level during and after last workout

     Then you would get a score and if your score was too high you would modify your planned work out. 

     

     

    2. Second,  if the answer is no to the above question I plan on trying and make a system for myself.  Therefore, what are the indicators that you all use for your level of fatigue?

    Orion Goals: 5k 18:30 10K 38:00 Marathon 3:10

    RunOJRun.blogspot.com

      overthink

      Come all you no-hopers, you jokers and rogues
      We're on the road to nowhere, let's find out where it goes

        I'm simple.  I basically ask myself:

         

        "How slow do I have to go to run easy?" or "How fast can I run before it stops feeling easy?"

         

        Since even hard runs have warm-ups, it's easy enough to do.  I think modifying the run on the run is the way to go.

         

        Figuring out what "easy" means is where the real money is, so to speak.

        "When a person trains once, nothing happens. When a person forces himself to do a thing a hundred or a thousand times, then he certainly has developed in more ways than physical. Is it raining? That doesn't matter. Am I tired? That doesn't matter, either. Then willpower will be no problem." 
        Emil Zatopek


        just a simple cat

          I just check and see if I feel like:

           

          Dang, why do my legs feel like hippo legs?

          How long have I been running?  hours?

          4 miles is plenty, really

          I need to nap more

          Heartrate is too high (165)  I'm not even going fast.

           

          Then my level of recovery is lacking.

           

          I  guess as you get more bodacious, you begin to lose more brain cells, because there is a limit to how much magnificence your body can house

          xor


            If I have to work hard to figure out how tired I am, that is going to make me tired.

             

            There's a deal in IT and computer science that when you place a monitor/meter to watch a system, the presence of the monitor changes the system a little bit.

             

            Anyway, no score.  I can (sincerely) see the value in such a thing, but I don't do it that way.

             

              Have you seen restwise?

              Race Plans

              New Year's Race Los Angeles, January 3, 2015

                 

                There's a deal in IT and computer science that when you place a monitor/meter to watch a system, the presence of the monitor changes the system a little bit.

                 

                 

                 I think this is known as the Observer effect.

                  1.  First, does anyone know of a way to quantify your level of fatigue? 

                   

                  I.e. you answer some questions about your level of fatigue and it gives you a score?  Something someone can use to determine if they need more rest, if they should skip the hard work, or they should not increase their weekly mileage?

                  I envision the system were you would answer questions about your level of fatigue.  For me that indicators I can think of are;  

                  • Calf Tightness
                  • Body Tiredness
                  • Effort of Last Workout
                  • Quality of Last Workout
                  • Effort of Last 7 Days of Workouts
                  • Days since Last Break (Rest Period)
                  • Hydration Level
                  • Quality of Sleep
                  • Quality of Nutrition
                  • Fatigue level during and after last workout

                   Then you would get a score and if your score was too high you would modify your planned work out. 

                   

                   

                  2. Second,  if the answer is no to the above question I plan on trying and make a system for myself.  Therefore, what are the indicators that you all use for your level of fatigue?

                  We already have that here and actually already functional.  This is developed by Dr. Dick Brown.

                   

                  Your ist looks good and it's a neat idea but the question is: how do you QUANTIFY (as you said) things like calf tightness or body tiredness or fatigue level?  It looks to me, all due respect, the only one you can really QUANTIFY is...oh, sorry.  I thought it was "hours of sleep" but it's "quality of sleep" which would again be difficult to QUANTIFY.  Yes, you CAN put the numbers, like 1 to 10, and have people to "rate" it.  But it's still quite subjective.  That's the challenge of something like this.  

                  kevingienapp


                    When I ran in college, our coach had us religiously take our resting heart rate after we woke up each morning. I would wake up, walk over to a chair, sit down and take my resting heart rate. On most mornings, I'd be at 44-45. The day after a hard workout, I'd be at 48-50. Most of time, two days after the workout I'd be back to 44-45. If I wasn't back to normal, I'd hold off on the next workout for one more day. For our team, it was a pretty simple way for our coach to know how our bodies were taking the training stress.

                     

                    For a few weeks in my junior year, I had an elevated resting heart rate - around 47-51 but since it was close to the national meet, I pushed through. After nationals, we looked at my log and I had stopped responding favorably to new workouts, more intervals, etc., we concluded that my body was a little over trained. I backed off for two weeks and everything returned to normal.

                    Marathon: 3:40:04 - Chicago 2012 Half Marathon: 1:14:38 - Sam Costa 2008 10k: 32:57 - 2007 8k: 25:50 - 2003 5k: 15:33 - 2008 2Mile: 9:28 - 2003 Mile: 4:34 - 2003