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Running in the heat (Read 564 times)

    I am training for a fall marathon and so far training is going very well (following a custom McMillan program).  Where I live in south-central British Columbia we tend to get hot, but very dry summers.  I usually have to head out rather early in the morning before temperature get above 25 degrees celsius (about 80 F) and the runs go pretty well.

     

    However, I have been on vacation in Mexico for the past 10 days (with another 5 days to go) and the heat is killing me.  The temperature never seems to drop below 29 (86 F) and the humidity is always around 80%.  How does anyone run in this?????

     

    Instead of runs of up to 16 miles @ 8:00 to 8:30 pace and an average HR of 145 and I doing a max of about 6 miles @ 9:00 pace and the HR climbs well into the 150's.

     

    So my question is this.... How do I measure equivalent effort?  Is it based strictly on HR?  I don't want to back off too much (no chance of doing a "long" run here) but also find that even doing the 9:00 miles is an effort and I am sore all the time.

     

    Suggestions?

    2014 Goals

    Weight - 200 lbs (stuck around 211)

    2000 miles (1190 as of July 1)

    Work on stretching and flexibility (doing so much better at this!)

    Stay healthy for Boston 2015 (have a BQ -9:00 time) - check!

    Marathon - 3:10 (Goal Race in October)

    HM 1:29:59 (Goal race in July)

    10k - 39:59 (no goal race yet)

    5k - 19:30 (goal race July 4)

     

      I live in Dallas, TX, and running in the heat is challenging.  Basically, I don't.  I run at the gym on a treadmill during the summer months, and a couple times during the summer, I'll venture outside very early in the morning.

       

      I'm going to try to avoid answering anything on perceived effort (because I know that others know more).  But, I know that there was a forum dialogue on this about 4 - 6 weeks ago.  --> Forums  > Running 101  > running in heat vs letting it cool slightly (started 7-7-11 by dallasboycows)

       

      If it were me though (and I guess that I am answering, then), I'd slow down and get some time in at a fairly controlled pace (regardless of HR or speed).

       

      BTW, us southerners look forward to vacations heading north in the summer so that we can enjoy the nice fresh cool air.  What were you thinking??? Smile

       


      Cheers,
      Brian

      2014 Goals:

      #1: Do what I can do. <DOING>

      #2: 365 Hours training <NOPE, INJURED>

       


      Feeling the growl again

         

        So my question is this.... How do I measure equivalent effort?  Is it based strictly on HR?  I don't want to back off too much (no chance of doing a "long" run here) but also find that even doing the 9:00 miles is an effort and I am sore all the time.

         

        Suggestions?

         

        I don't think there is an easy answer or conversion for you.  For me, HR does not even get close to telling the story.  Last week one day I went out very late after the sun was down, did 12 miles at a good pace (like 6:50 I think).  Stashed a water bottle, it was not as easy as I would have liked but I got the miles in.  The next day I had to run earlier...it was hotter and more humid.  Same route, used water again, but it was all I could do to jog 8 miles at 7:22 pace.  Twice as hard, and I know my HR was not up much.

         

        It just sucks.  Get in what you can and do the best with it that is possible.  Back in 2002 I failed twice in a row trying to get in a decend 20-22 mile long run, it was unseasonably hot in September and I ended up walking parts of both runs to avoid heat stroke.  But we got an October day of around 40 degrees for Chicago and I took 7 minutes off my marathon PR to under 2:30.  You just have to put in the work and have faith that you'll see the results when conditions are more reasonable.

        "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

         


        Menace to Sobriety

          Spaniel has the right idea. Equivalency is going to be different for everyone. You can best be the judge as you know your training level better than anyone else. If your normal pace is 8:00, but in the heat a 9:30 pace feels just as hard, go with that. Those training plans are suggestions, not rules. They don't take into account wildly swinging temps and humidity, so adjust accordingly and do what you can.

          Janie, today I quit my job. And then I told my boss to go f*** himself, and then I blackmailed him for almost sixty thousand dollars. Pass the asparagus.