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The importance, prevention and treatment of Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS) (Read 235 times)

fellrnr


    The landing forces from running, especially downhill running, tend to produce Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS). DOMS not only involves delayed soreness, but also immediate weakness can ruin a race.  However, a key benefit of DOMS inducing exercise is that a bout of DOMS can give protection against similar future exercise, and the protection lasts for months. Taking protein after DOMS inducing exercise is one of the best treatments, though compression clothing, caffeine and massage can also help. This article distills over 100 scientific studies in a practical summary for athletes of all levels. http://fellrnr.com/wiki/Delayed_Onset_Muscle_Soreness

    JimR


      I smell spam

      noroll


        I smell spam

         

        http://fellrnr.com/wiki/2012_Poland_24_Hour_World_Championships

         

        He also created the greatest thread I've ever read in my short running life

         

        http://www.runningahead.com/forums/post/c47360c8236a49f5bbf696f892cdc0d5#focus

         

        Just sayin

        Don't bother me, I'm thinking.

          That's not spam.  That's Jonathan.  Hi Jonathan!

          Live the Adventure. Enjoy the Journey. Be Kind. Have Faith!


          old woman w/ hobby

            Hey, fellrnr.  Love your site!

            steph  

             

            OCD  If you don't laugh...   

              Hey, fellrnr.  Love your site!

               

              Agreed! There's SPAM and then there's education.... his is the latter.

                Great post, very interesting!

                 

                Was there anything useful in the literature regarding DOMS, creatine (phospho)kinase, and rhabdomyolysis?  It might be helpful to add another section along the lines of Beyond DOMS: Rhabdomyolysis

                 

                I also noticed that there is no mention of DOMS and hydration level during exercise. Since dehydration is (or at least seems to be) a factor in rhabdomyolysis, it could be a factor in aggravating DOMS, but the only study I found was the usual 10 subjects divided into control and test, and of course did not find any statistically significant links for soreness or strength.

                2013 H1:  7 hours/week base.  Q3: Train for goal race.  Q4:  Goal Race.


                Bacon Party!

                  Nice timing! Was thinking of you (and your wiki [which sounds dirty, but isn't]) while I did my extended downhill run this morning.

                  Liz

                  pace sera, sera


                  And in the end...

                    There are some recent studies that may support the benefit of ice baths.

                    http://www.runnersworld.com/injury-prevention-recovery/two-studies-back-benefits-ice-baths

                    ------------------------

                    The GITM is moot.

                    MonkeyBunny


                      If you want to avoid DOMS, don't turn 40.

                      Houston Marathon 1-13-13

                      Rock n Roll St. Pete Half 2-10-13

                      Gasparilla 15K 2-23-13

                      Armadillo 10K 3-9-13

                      Ogden Marathon 5-18-13

                      Steamtown?

                      Baystate?

                      The Goal:  Boston Marathon 4-20-15

                      beachrun


                        If you want to avoid DOMS, don't turn 40.

                         

                        +1 or 50.....Or take PEDS.  Or testosterone, which is a PED?

                        fellrnr


                          Great post, very interesting!

                           

                          Was there anything useful in the literature regarding DOMS, creatine (phospho)kinase, and rhabdomyolysis?  It might be helpful to add another section along the lines of Beyond DOMS: Rhabdomyolysis

                           

                          I also noticed that there is no mention of DOMS and hydration level during exercise. Since dehydration is (or at least seems to be) a factor in rhabdomyolysis, it could be a factor in aggravating DOMS, but the only study I found was the usual 10 subjects divided into control and test, and of course did not find any statistically significant links for soreness or strength.

                           

                          I've been meaning to research Rhabdo, but it's low in my priority list right now. It seems that Rhabdo is a factor in acute kidney failure, along with NSAIDs, dehydration and infection -

                          http://fellrnr.com/wiki/NSAIDs_and_Running#NSAIDs_and_Acute_kidney_failure

                          fellrnr


                            There are some recent studies that may support the benefit of ice baths.

                            http://www.runnersworld.com/injury-prevention-recovery/two-studies-back-benefits-ice-baths

                             

                            I'll look into that further - I need to review the research on icing. I did find a link to a link to a study on NSAIDs that I'll review - http://adisonline.com/sportsmedicine/Abstract/2012/42120/The_Use_of_Nonsteroidal_Anti_Inflammatory_Drugs.3.aspx

                            xor


                              I smell spam

                               

                              fellrnr does have a habit of showing up just to link his blog, but he's been doing that for years (mostly on RWOL), it's generally good stuff, and as you can see, fellrnr is happy to discuss his stuff in the threads.

                               

                              Howdy fell-rocknroll...

                               

                                There are some recent studies that may support the benefit of ice baths.

                                http://www.runnersworld.com/injury-prevention-recovery/two-studies-back-benefits-ice-baths

                                 

                                There was also an article in RT about ice baths.  The gist is they shouldn't be used regularly when in a key training phase because it interfers with adaptations.

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