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GPS and Pace (Read 1219 times)

runrockclimb


    I just got my first GPS watch, the garmin forerunner 210 and I have a few questions about pace, and pace with the watch. First of all, should I be running with the average pace displayed, or current or does it matter?

    What are some good ways to help work on keeping my pace consistent. I seems to be all over the place, especially when I selected current pace...

    Also does anyone know if I can set an interval workout and have its warn me when my pace is falling off or I'm going to fast, or is this something that can't be done together? The manual that comes with the watch is surprisingly light on details.

      Garmin maintains up-to-date owner's manuals on their website.  The one for the 210 is HERE.  It does not have a Pace Alert feature.

       

      As for Current Pace, I never found it to be particularly accurate.  I set mine to Auto-Lap (page 4 of the manual) every mile, then have it display either Average Pace or Lap Pace (also on page 4).

      “Everything you need is already inside.” -- Bill Bowerman


      day after day sameness

        Current, real-time pace is absolute poop. Both from the aspect of GPS being able to give you good data (you are waving you arm back and forth, after all), and from the aspect of being any sort of useful input about your workout. Forget about it.

        Choosing my words carefully has never been my strength I've been known to be vague and often pointless

        northernman


        Fight The Future

          I just got my first GPS watch, the garmin forerunner 210 and I have a few questions about pace, and pace with the watch. First of all, should I be running with the average pace displayed, or current or does it matter?

          What are some good ways to help work on keeping my pace consistent. I seems to be all over the place, especially when I selected current pace...

          Also does anyone know if I can set an interval workout and have its warn me when my pace is falling off or I'm going to fast, or is this something that can't be done together? The manual that comes with the watch is surprisingly light on details.

           I think you can only get good current pace if you use the footpod. Looks like the 210 is compatible with it, so you might want to give it a try


          Feeling the growl again

            GPS is simply not accurate enough to give a reasonably steady current pace at running speeds.  Period.  I've posted some of the math before but I don't have the link.  If you're in a car, sure, you are going fast enough (covering enough distance per second) that the error becomes comparatively small enough, and a reasonably accurate current pace would be displayed.  Turn it on in your car and you will see that it is much more steady.

             

            I set mine to average pace.  Once you cover at least a mile, it's pretty good.

             

            It is next to useless for repeats.  Again, the errors are too large compared to a 400m repeat for the data to be useful.  What I will do is measure the distance out by running it 2-3 times and getting the end marks "right" with the GPS, then just use it as a stop watch after that.  Forget about it pacing you.  Run a couple and you will start to learn the right pace.

            "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

             

              Spaniel, I have a 'wheel-marked' 4 mile course (pretty much straight with no turns and out in the open) that is marked off in 100m increments.  What I found is that for anything less than 400m the GPS is pretty much useless for running intervals.  But when you get to 400m and anything higher than that it the accuracy (though not dead on of course) is perfectly acceptable for running intervals, IMHO.

               

              And I fully agree with others that the current pace on any GPS is not useful.  Set it to some kind of pace averaging.


              Feeling the growl again

                Spaniel, I have a 'wheel-marked' 4 mile course (pretty much straight with no turns and out in the open) that is marked off in 100m increments.  What I found is that for anything less than 400m the GPS is pretty much useless for running intervals.  But when you get to 400m and anything higher than that it the accuracy (though not dead on of course) is perfectly acceptable for running intervals, IMHO.

                 

                And I fully agree with others that the current pace on any GPS is not useful.  Set it to some kind of pace averaging.

                 

                I think I wasn't quite clear.  The distance is accurate...like I said GPS is how I measure them out.  The part I meant to say was useless and I didn't type out quite right was average pace during the interval....for say an 800m interval or longer you can start looking at the average pace around 400m, and use it to guide you for the rest of the interval if needed.  However if you are doing a 400m interval and look at the average pace at 200m for some feedback, it will be garbage.  You have to cover 400m before what you see has any meaning.

                "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                 

                  On my iPhone it gives an option for audio cues for average pace, current split pace, and current pace.

                   

                  Average pace = average pace, seems pretty accurate.

                   

                  Current Split Pace = the average pace for the current split you are running.  The shortest split I've used it for is 400m and it has always seemed to do pretty well. 

                   

                  Current Pace = whatever the pace is from the last GPS measurement (I think it takes them every 6 seconds).  It could be off by over 1:00 per mile on the pace it gives on this one.  Completely worthless.

                  Age: 46 Weight: 208 Height: 6'2" (Goal weight 195)

                  Current PR's:  Mara 3:48:09; HM 1:43:26; 10K 44:51; 5K 21:27


                  I am The Tortoise

                    I just got my first GPS watch, the garmin forerunner 210 and I have a few questions about pace, and pace with the watch. First of all, should I be running with the average pace displayed, or current or does it matter?

                    What are some good ways to help work on keeping my pace consistent. I seems to be all over the place, especially when I selected current pace...

                    Also does anyone know if I can set an interval workout and have its warn me when my pace is falling off or I'm going to fast, or is this something that can't be done together? The manual that comes with the watch is surprisingly light on details.

                     

                     

                    As CliveF said, current pace is very unstable. Best to set Auto Lap to 1 mile and use Lap Pace. The first couple hundred yards of each mile (when the lap is fresh) the pace may fluctuate but after that it will become more stable. Or use average pace if you prefer.

                    Linda6897


                    Linda

                      As CliveF said, current pace is very unstable. Best to set Auto Lap to 1 mile and use Lap Pace. The first couple hundred yards of each mile (when the lap is fresh) the pace may fluctuate but after that it will become more stable. Or use average pace if you prefer.

                       

                      I like to set my autolap to every 1/2 mile, and use lap pace.  The lap pace is off for approximately 30 seconds of each lap, then it seems very accurate.

                      2014 Goal:  Just Run!

                       

                      Over 40 PR's

                      Half - 1:38:52, 5K - 21:31

                       

                        I think everyone is a bit too hard on the current pace feature. I reference it all the time and find it accurate to what I think it should be. Of course it takes several seconds after a change of pace to update as everyone has said. I'd add that you have to use the current pace in conjunction with all the other information you're feeling.

                        For example, if you think you're running too fast and look at it will probably confirm or deny that feeling and then when you slow your pace to what you think you should be running it updates and is accurate again. Accurate enough to confirm your pace adjustment anyway.

                         

                        The average lap pace just will not give you this data. My method here assumes that you have a fair amount of confidence in running by feel and would be worthless to anyone who is not at least a bit in tune with their expected vs. perceived performance. I'm no expecrt but I know if I'm running about a 7:30 or 8:30 or 9:30. The current pace can help to confirm that.


                        Feeling the growl again

                          I think everyone is a bit too hard on the current pace feature. I reference it all the time and find it accurate to what I think it should be. Of course it takes several seconds after a change of pace to update as everyone has said. I'd add that you have to use the current pace in conjunction with all the other information you're feeling.

                          For example, if you think you're running too fast and look at it will probably confirm or deny that feeling and then when you slow your pace to what you think you should be running it updates and is accurate again. Accurate enough to confirm your pace adjustment anyway.

                           

                          The average lap pace just will not give you this data. My method here assumes that you have a fair amount of confidence in running by feel and would be worthless to anyone who is not at least a bit in tune with their expected vs. perceived performance. I'm no expecrt but I know if I'm running about a 7:30 or 8:30 or 9:30. The current pace can help to confirm that.

                           

                          It can't confirm or refute anything when it varies thirty seconds either way of what I am really running. I have had someone on a bike with a wheel-mounted bike computer confirm I was holding constant pace on wide open, flat ground while it does this. If you do the math with the advertised inherent accuracy level of the device, this is not that surprising.

                          "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                           

                          JimR


                            I think everyone is a bit too hard on the current pace feature. I reference it all the time and find it accurate to what I think it should be. Of course it takes several seconds after a change of pace to update as everyone has said. I'd add that you have to use the current pace in conjunction with all the other information you're feeling.

                            For example, if you think you're running too fast and look at it will probably confirm or deny that feeling and then when you slow your pace to what you think you should be running it updates and is accurate again. Accurate enough to confirm your pace adjustment anyway.

                             

                            The average lap pace just will not give you this data. My method here assumes that you have a fair amount of confidence in running by feel and would be worthless to anyone who is not at least a bit in tune with their expected vs. perceived performance. I'm no expecrt but I know if I'm running about a 7:30 or 8:30 or 9:30. The current pace can help to confirm that.

                             

                            How does one use current pace when running hilly terrain?

                              As ever one has said. The current pace setting is far less accurate than averaging. You could only use it on hilly terrain if you have a good feel for your pace. As I said. I know the difference between an eight and nine minute effort without GPS but if I were really tired and running up and down big hills it would be nearly impossible. That doesn't make the current pace feature useless though.


                              Interval Junkie --Nobby

                                For the first 9mi of the Philly marathon I obeyed my Garmin Avg Pace for miles.  Dead-on with my plan.  However, at the 9mi mark I was 30sec behind my pace-band.  All the miles were short.  At the end, I think the garmin (610) was 600m short of the finish-line.

                                 

                                That being said, I mostly use my garmin for making sure I'm not going too fast when I feel really really good at the beginning of a race.

                                2014 Goals:  sub-3 Marathon 

                                Current Status 08/28: Slowly working back up from a pelvic stress fracture.  4mil distance PR w00t!

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