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Running with Flat Feet (Read 159 times)

L.Chang


    I am wondering if there are any runners here who, like me, suffer from fallen arches. For the most part I can run, but certainly not as long as other people. I also go through shoes a lot more quickly.

     

    In general, what are your experiences running with flat feet? Do you have any tips or advice for preventing injuries? What kinds of shoes would you recommend? How do you warm up? etc.

    StellarsJJayS


      I am wondering if there are any runners here who, like me, suffer from fallen arches. For the most part I can run, but certainly not as long as other people. I also go through shoes a lot more quickly.

       

      In general, what are your experiences running with flat feet? Do you have any tips or advice for preventing injuries? What kinds of shoes would you recommend? How do you warm up? etc.

       

      I've had a pair of the flattest feet imaginable for forty-seven years...running 25 of those years.. . I've run several marathons, many, many halfs.  I run trails, I run roads, I run hills I do speed work.  I run in minimalist shoes as well as the cheapest of "normal" running shoes that I can find.  My shoes generally last 800-1100 miles.

       

      What are your questions and/or problems?  I just put on my shoes (and clothes!) and head out the door and run.  (I have bunions on both feet as well.  A podiatrist once told me that he couldn't imagine how I walk let alone run....and suggested that I stop running.)

      There is only one acceptable pace...all out suicide...

      ...and today is a good day to die!

                 --  Pre

        I have completely flat over-pronating feet.  I run in motion control shoes (Brooks Beast) and have no problem running as far and as often as I want to.  I replace my shoes at around 500 miles.  I don't alternate shoes, but I probably should.  I only warm up for races.  For a training run, I just start slow and speed up as I get warmed up.


        Latent Runner

          For a training run, I just start slow and speed up as I get warmed up.

          +1

           

          Exactly my M.O. as well!

          Fat old man PRs:

          • 1-mile (point to point, gravity assist): 5:50
          • 2-mile: 13:49
          • 5K (gravity assist last mile): 21:31
          • 5-Mile: 37:24
          • 10K (first 10K of my Half Marathon): 48:16
          • 10-Mile (first 10 miles of my Half Marathon): 1:17:40
          • Half Marathon: 1:42:13


          Ostrich runner

            Do you know why your shoes wear out quickly? Nothing about fallen arches automatically leads to that. Nonetheless, I have them, though they haven't presented any problems a foot rubz ball doesn't take care of in a very long time. 

            http://www.runningahead.com/groups/Indy/forum

              I also start slowly and gradually speed up, but I'm fairly certain that this has nothing to do with my flat feet.

               

              My feet and ankles do feel pretty beat up in the morning and I'm pretty much shuffling around for a bit every morning. I wouldn't worry too much about the whole flat foot thing, L.Chang. In fact, I am now realizing that I had to do the same morning shuffle way back when I was 16 and playing lots of basketball.  It's just a little thing.  Roll with it.

               

              In terms of shoes, I do find I'm better off with some support, but as I've run more over the last 5 years I've learned to run less clunkily.  I'd not worry to much about it.

              "If you have the fire, run..." -John Climacus

                In terms of shoes, I do find I'm better off with some support, but as I've run more over the last 5 years I've learned to run less clunkily.  I'd not worry to much about it.

                 

                My knee and shins bother me when I run in shoes with less support.  When I was in high school in the late 70's I ran in a shoe from Brooks called the Vantage Supreme that had an early form of motion control called the varus wedge.  It probably gave a lot less support than the Beast, but my body was younger then too.  I started running in the Beast about 15 or so years ago.  Perhaps my body would adjust to less support if I ran through the knee and shin pain for a while, but I have had too many setbacks from injuries.  Why fix something that isn't broken?

                 

                I used to be able to buy last years model for $70-$90, but I can't find those deals this year.  I went to my local running store last weekend and they didn't even have it in stock.  They had to order it for me. Hopefully Brooks will continue to make them, but they seem to be getting harder and harder to find.

                   

                  My knee and shins bother me when I run in shoes with less support.  When I was in high school in the late 70's I ran in a shoe from Brooks called the Vantage Supreme that had an early form of motion control called the varus wedge.  It probably gave a lot less support than the Beast, but my body was younger then too.  I started running in the Beast about 15 or so years ago.  Perhaps my body would adjust to less support if I ran through the knee and shin pain for a while, but I have had too many setbacks from injuries.  Why fix something that isn't broken?

                   

                  I used to be able to buy last years model for $70-$90, but I can't find those deals this year.  I went to my local running store last weekend and they didn't even have it in stock.  They had to order it for me. Hopefully Brooks will continue to make them, but they seem to be getting harder and harder to find.

                  I see no reason.

                   

                  You may  want to try to gradually work in something with slightly less support a few times a week. Of course, why complicate life?

                  "If you have the fire, run..." -John Climacus

                    Do you have any tips or advice for preventing injuries?

                     

                    Run very slowly, very short distances, and build up very slowly, at a rate your feet (and other body parts) can handle.

                     

                    As a flatfooted pronator, I don't think that's an issue.  Back to what I said in the first line.  FWIW, I run 55-ish miles per week, no arch support (I wear Vibrams).

                    Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

                      My arches also fall when I run. I've run 4 marathons and many miles. I wear orthotics that you can get off of Amazon (Sole) and I would never run without them. I get 300-400 miles max out if my shoes. I get new shoes around 250 and wear my old ones for shorter runs and runs where I don't feel great and may have to walk (which rarely ends up happening).

                       

                      I supinate pretty badly and land more on my forefoot. I've had numerous injuries, the most annoying probably being posterior tibial tendonitis, but I think that is more from supination that flat feet. To prevent injuries I highly recommend a good pair of orthotics. That will keep your arches from falling and you won't have to worry about it as much. I don't even think about it because I always run with my orthotics.

                        I am wondering if there are any runners here who, like me, suffer from fallen arches. For the most part I can run, but certainly not as long as other people. I also go through shoes a lot more quickly.

                         

                        There is no reason you can't run as much as other people that don't have flat feet.  Last year my mileage was over 4000 miles and I completed three 50 mile races all with flat feet.     I currently use orthotics but am trying to wean myself off them because I think they are affecting my balance and form.  We will see how that works out.

                        kristin10185


                        I race in SparkleSkirts

                          I have very flat feet. I am curious just HOW important arch support is with flat feet. Any insole or orthotic that has arch support causes me excruciating pain. I can't walk or run with it. Physically cannot. Maybe I just haven't found the right one but I'm throwing away so much money trying to find it. I just feel so much more comfortable without anything special in my shoes. My PT and podiatrist said I need the arch support. Can I do long term damage by running without it?

                          PRs:   5K- 28:16 (5/5/13)      10K- 1:00:13 (10/27/13)    4M- 41:43 (9/7/13)   15K- 1:34:25  (8/17/13)    10M- 1:56:30 (4/6/14)     HM- 2:20:16 (4/13/14)

                           

                          I started a blog about running :) Check it out if you care to

                            I have very flat feet. I am curious just HOW important arch support is with flat feet. Any insole or orthotic that has arch support causes me excruciating pain. I can't walk or run with it. Physically cannot. Maybe I just haven't found the right one but I'm throwing away so much money trying to find it. I just feel so much more comfortable without anything special in my shoes. My PT and podiatrist said I need the arch support. Can I do long term damage by running without it?

                             

                            I think there's a substantive difference between arch support which is good, vs making your foot arch which is bad.  Most running shoes (every one I've seen) designed for overpronating runners with flat feet, have very low arches in them, because that is how your foot is shaped.  The shoes then support your foot, to keep it in its natural (for you) shape.  If you try and change the way your foot is shaped, and then put 3x your body weight in force through it up to 1.5x a second I'd be surprised if your foot didn't hurt.

                             

                            MTA: I've been running 8+ years at a division 3 varsity level, with flat feet and no *knock wood* major injuries (longest rehab time I've had the last 4 years has been ~2 weeks no running)

                            Know thyself.

                             

                            rundwoods


                               Any insole or orthotic that has arch support causes me excruciating pain. I can't walk or run with it. Physically cannot.

                               

                              I went through the same thing a few years back. It turned out that I did not need any additional arch support, and that I have a very neutral gait which may be unusual with flat feet. This was after years of motion control shoes, stability shoes, orthotics etc, based on doctor and LRS recommendations. When I finally found a running shoe fitting expert, she put me Brooks Dyads. I wore those for a few years, and then she put me in the Launch. I felt like she saved my running career.


                              running > all else

                                I have flat feet, and minimalist running shoes have worked best, interestingly...for me.

                                I had more stiffness and pain from running in the past, when I wore 'heavier' more 'supportive' for lack of a better word, running shoes.

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