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Local 10K result (Read 576 times)


Slow-smooth-fast

    I just thought that I would like to share with you all my latest 10k race result. It was a local race organised with work friends. I started running in nov at a weight of 19stone. My first 10K was on New years eve, and I did it in a time of 50:20- 8:08 minute mile pace I thought that I would never beat this and was really pleased with it. I have literally just got back from my latest 10K race and I did it in........46:51 - 7:34 minute mile pace. I cant believe I have actually knocke this much off it, and got great mile paces my my accounts. Btw, I now am 15 stone, more to lose yet. I honestly do now think I wont be able to go much quicker than this. Please guys what do you think of the time. Feedback much appreciated.

    "I've been following Eddy's improvement over the last two years on this site, and it's been pretty dang solid. Sure the weekly mileage has been up and down, but over the long haul he's getting out the door and has turned himself into quite a runner. He's only now just figuring out his potential. Consistency in running is measured in years, not weeks. And over the last couple of years, Eddy's made great strides" Jeff 14 Jan 2009

      That is remarkable improvement in so short a time. How much weight do you still want to lose?
      I honestly do now think I wont be able to go much quicker than this. Please guys what do you think of the time. Feedback much appreciated.
      I think you're very, very wrong. If you improved that quickly, and you're still overweight, you're going to get plenty faster. Your improvement might slow down some ... but no way you're done improving after a whopping 3 months of running. Now go read every thread started by Kooky2003 (it'll take a while Roll eyes ). Interesting reading for you freaks that improve that quickly, with just about zero training. You two should hang out. But learn from her, and don't get hurt. Take it easy and improve over time.
      E-mail: JakeKnight2002@aol.com
      -----------------------------


      Slow-smooth-fast

        That is remarkable improvement in so short a time. How much weight do you still want to lose? wanna get to 12st7 ideally.

        "I've been following Eddy's improvement over the last two years on this site, and it's been pretty dang solid. Sure the weekly mileage has been up and down, but over the long haul he's getting out the door and has turned himself into quite a runner. He's only now just figuring out his potential. Consistency in running is measured in years, not weeks. And over the last couple of years, Eddy's made great strides" Jeff 14 Jan 2009


        Prophet!

          wow..that's an amazing accomplishment at such a short time...great job...i'm sure you can get faster as well with more training and more time. I wish i can get that fast..it took me a whole year to get from 10+ minute mile pace to 9 minute mile pace...i'm very jealous. congrats on your 10K again


          Slow-smooth-fast

            Come on guys, give me some much needed feedback, perhaps your stories of how and how long it took you to get a decent 10K time. I really, ideally, realistic or not want to get it down to below 40 mins. Is this achievable? Speak to me guys

            "I've been following Eddy's improvement over the last two years on this site, and it's been pretty dang solid. Sure the weekly mileage has been up and down, but over the long haul he's getting out the door and has turned himself into quite a runner. He's only now just figuring out his potential. Consistency in running is measured in years, not weeks. And over the last couple of years, Eddy's made great strides" Jeff 14 Jan 2009

              You've accomplished a lot in a short time, Eddy. Enjoy it and use it is motivation to keep going, but keep in mind your progress will slow down the fitter you get. I think you can get to sub-40 minutes, but there's no way to predict how long it will take.

              Runners run.

                I would say that there is no real way of knowing how quick you could go, simply because you are nowhere near your ideal weight at the moment. It's fair to say you'll continue to improve naturally as the weight comes off. 40 minutes is a realistic goal but probably best to focus on smaller targets or just on getting under your latest time. There will come a time when you run a race and you don't improve too much or run slower than you have done in the past. The key is to take the positives and not feel this is a setback because the improvements will start to slow. By the way, which race did you run your 46 minute time?
                  I ran all of my first races last year. My first 5K time was 26:36, 8:34/mile. (By the way, this was only 2 months after moving from the treadmill to outside where my first run was at 5.8mph. I had also lost about 60 of the 90 pounds I had to lose, and had NEVER been active.) I had only been running for about 10 months at that point. My first 10K was 2 weeks later, and I ran it with my husband. Without planning to ahead of time, I kept him in sight at all times and finished in 52:06 for an 8:24/mile pace. Fast forward 4 months, where I focused much more on endurance than speed. I worked up to a 16 mile run, and did very little speed work. I got faster just by dropping more weight (20 more) and changing my body composition. In September I ran a 10K in 45:17 with a 7:18 pace. That blew.me.away. I was not expecting that AT ALL. This year in September (my area has very few races, and I will be lucky to get in more than 4 in a year) I want to aim for a 7 minute mile. I figure I've shocked myself before without much effort, why not try it again? I think that building up my long, slow runs definitely helped me to be faster at the shorter distances. I also ran my first marathon and fourth ever race in January and beat my goal of 4 hours by coming in at 3:59:18. (Hey, what's the statute of limitations on slipping that into conversations? Big grin ) My point is that you've show great improvement in a very short period of time. I think that 40 minutes is totally doable, especially if you add in more structured speed work. And you'll be surprised what your body can do once you hit your goal weight.
                  "Running is a big question mark that's there each and every day. It asks you, 'Are you going to be a wimp or are you going to be strong today?' " - Peter Maher, Irish-Canadian Olympian