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Hamstring pain. (Read 131 times)

bcap


    Hi,

    New to the board. Been dealing with a dull achy hamstring problem for close to two months now. The pain seems to be a deep muscle ache rather than pinpointing it on the surface. It doesn't hurt when I sit or lay down. It hurts when I try to stretch it. It almost feels as if there is a constant tugging on it. It also hurts for about the first five minutes of my run. The tugging sensation is also present when I try to burst at full speed. On my free time I play softball. When I was rounding the bases a felt a little tweak. That was two months ago and it has yet to heal. Anyone have this similar problem? what can be done? I am 22 years old. Former college football player and is still in shape. Its just an annoying injury. Any help would do. Thanks

    quagga


      You should join the conversation over in this thread:

      http://www.runningahead.com/forums/topic/11d3892f87694e09a2b9610ccdffb92b/resume#focus


      Running Chick

        have you tried 'rolling'?  sometimes that helps.  i bought something called 'the stick' from amazon; and it looks like giant beads  -  sounds kinda silly.  but it worked for me!  i still use it periodically.  maybe give that a try and roll over legs.

        sport jester


        Biomimeticist

          Pain in the hamstrings while running is a byproduct of poor form for distance runners. However for you it could also be your body thinking that your technique for how it generated greater force as you played football is the same for generating more power and increase in speed for your recreational running.

           

          As the pain demonstrates, the two techniques have absolutely nothing in common with each other given the different goals each one has for you.

           

          The biology is pretty simple. that hamstring pain is a byproduct caused by too much forward lean or excessive outward rotation in pronation of your feet. The posture works for playing football, but distance running is a completely different mechanical skill to master.

           

          Not to mention that the surface you run on will influence how your body absorbs variation in any terrain.

           

          The biology behind your problem is a balance issue; that as the hamstrings pull the lower leg back, there's a much stronger muscle in the quads trying to do the exact opposite movement in the limb. Its referred to as an antagonistic pair. Important in that relationship however, is that the quads are the much stronger between the two.

           

          And because they can generate more power, your running technique on a football field demanded optimum quad application. For distance running, that postural imbalance causes the hamstring work overload which you experience as pain.

           

          Adjusting how your feet land determines the quad/hamstring antagonistic relationship through your running mechanics. Improving it would remove the stress loads you're currently applying to your hamstrings.

          Experts said the world is flat

          Experts said that man would never fly

          Experts said we'd never go to the moon

           

          Name me one of those "experts"...

           

          History never remembers the name of experts; just the innovators who had the guts to challenge and prove the "experts" wrong

          armyrunner3


          DJ Gordo

            Go to the Chiropractor and get 'Ultrasound' treatment on it.  A few sessions of that and your hamstrings will be back to full capacity.

            TRAIN HARD WIN EASY
            bcap


              Thank you for the help. I will look into correcting my running form. I been doing light stretches. I've also been sitting on a baseball and rolling it up and down the hamstring. That seems to be working. There's less of a tug on the hamstring and less pain. It feels better this week than it did last week. Of course with hamstring injuries caution is always the best route. Thank you all once again

                My hamstring/hip issue was due to a strength imbalance.  My left side was weak.  After some stretching and strength training, all is well again.

                Live the Adventure. Enjoy the Journey. Be Kind. Have Faith!

                Stevan Mcgrath


                  Hey! Going through your query here is a reply.
                  Hamstring is more common in Players for the following reasons

                  Hamstring:
                  It isn't actually a single ''string.''
                  It's a group of three muscles that run along the back of your thigh. 
                  They allow you to bend your leg at the knee.
                  hamstring strains are both common and painful. 
                  During a hamstring strain, one or more of these muscles gets stretched too far.
                  The muscles might even start to tear. You're likely to get a hamstring strain during exercise that involves a lot of running and jumping or sudden stopping and starting.

                  Preventing a Hamstring Strain:

                  As hamstring strains can be nasty injuries, athletes should work hard to avoid them. 
                  Healing a hamstring strain is much harder than preventing it.


                  Prevention Tips:

                  # Stretch before and after physical activity.
                  # Stop exercising if you feel pain in the back of your thigh.
                  # Always increase the intensity of your physical activity slowly 
                  # Stretch and strengthen hamstrings as a preventative measure.

                  Treatments:
                  # Rest the leg. 
                  Avoid putting weight on the leg as best you can. If the pain is severe, you may need crutches until it goes away. Ask doctor or physical therapist if they're needed.

                  # Ice your leg to reduce pain and swelling:
                  Do it for 20-30 minutes every three to four hours for two to three days, or until the pain is gone.

                  #  Compress your leg
                  Use an elastic bandage around the leg to keep down swelling.

                  #  Elevate your leg on a pillow when you're sitting or lying down.
                  #  Take anti-inflammatory painkillers.
                  #  Practice stretching and strengthening exercises if your doctor recommends them.

                  Regards
                  Stevan Mcgrath