1

Decline treadmill recommendations? (Read 421 times)

fellrnr


    Does anyone have a recommendation for a treadmill that does decline? Most of the one's I've seen either don't do more than 3% decline, or like the NordicTrack x7, won't do the steep decline at a faster pace. Ideally I'd like at least 5% decline with a 9 MPH speed. Raising the back of the treadmill might work, but I'd be concerned that it would burn the motor out.


    Feeling the growl again

      I have not seen that combination of features offered during my treadmill shopping.  Personally I would recommend against anything in a NordicTrack price point if you would run on it as much as I think you would, it won't hold up long.  Mine (Commercial 1500) is 10 months old and I am on the 4th console and just found out my deck is cracked almost in half lengthwise.

       

      I know some elites have indeed propped up the back of treadmills for downhill training (ie Boston).  I don't know about the motor but I would be careful to work your way up in decline as the belt tension that works running flat may not be enough to keep from slipping on a decline.

      "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

       

        Does anyone have a recommendation for a treadmill that does decline? Most of the one's I've seen either don't do more than 3% decline, or like the NordicTrack x7, won't do the steep decline at a faster pace. Ideally I'd like at least 5% decline with a 9 MPH speed. Raising the back of the treadmill might work, but I'd be concerned that it would burn the motor out.

         

        Why do you think raising the back would burn the motor out?

         

        When I was training for Boston, and everyone had me freaked about the downhills, I propped up the back to about 5%, and then adjusted the incline accordingly for downhills, flat, and uphill segments. It worked quite well.... on my crappy Sole treadmill.

         

        There aren't too many TMs these days that don't go 12MPH. Those that cap out at 10 aren't meant for much running.


        Imminent Catastrophe

          A 4x4 under the back works well. But not at the local gym.

          "Able to function despite imminent catastrophe"

           "To obtain the air that angels breathe you must come to Tahoe"--Mark Twain

          "The most common question from potential entrants is 'I do not know if I can do this' to which I usually answer, 'that's the whole point'.--Paul Charteris, Tarawera Ultramarathon RD.

           

          √ Tahoe Rim Trail 100M 20/21 July 2013

          Boston Marathon 21 April 2014

          Tahoe Rim Trail 100M 19/20 July 2014


          Right on Hereford...

            I would be careful to work your way up in decline as the belt tension that works running flat may not be enough to keep from slipping on a decline.

             

            Why would that make a difference?


            Feeling the growl again

              I would be careful to work your way up in decline as the belt tension that works running flat may not be enough to keep from slipping on a decline.

               

              Why would that make a difference?

               

              Downhill = potential for some braking action.

               

              If you have decent form, on flat ground you will land under your center of mass and press backward along the direction of the belt's motion.  If you are running downhill there is a tendency to apply a braking force in the opposite direction of the belt's travel.  If the tension on your belt is borderline, this could cause it to slip and potentially cause you to fall.

              "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

               

              fellrnr


                 

                Why do you think raising the back would burn the motor out?

                 

                When I was training for Boston, and everyone had me freaked about the downhills, I propped up the back to about 5%, and then adjusted the incline accordingly for downhills, flat, and uphill segments. It worked quite well.... on my crappy Sole treadmill.

                 

                There aren't too many TMs these days that don't go 12MPH. Those that cap out at 10 aren't meant for much running.

                 

                I tried it on a cheap treadmill and it ground to a halt as it didn't have the power to lift my weight up.

                 

                The low speed cap is only on decline. The X7 will do 12 MPH on the flat or uphill, but on the 6% decent I think it only goes 4MPH or 15:00 min/mile.

                Longboat


                Letting off steam

                  This one got stuck on a steep incline.  Fixed with the wood block - then realized I could over-fix it for downhill as well.  It worked fine on ~4%.  No problem with burn out.  I don't think I've seen any with really steep declines.

                  Neil

                  ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                  Nearly back to 100% 6 months after Achilles surgery. Now at 35 50 mpw.

                  Base building time!

                  Arimathea


                  Tessa

                     

                    I tried it on a cheap treadmill and it ground to a halt as it didn't have the power to lift my weight up.

                     

                    The low speed cap is only on decline. The X7 will do 12 MPH on the flat or uphill, but on the 6% decent I think it only goes 4MPH or 15:00 min/mile.

                     

                    Who the heck runs uphill at up to 12 mph (5 mpm) and then WALKS downhill at a speed not exceeding 4 mph? I think most of us mortals would go the other way. Walk uphill, run down.