RA Movie Thread (Read 5576 times)

    This is 40 (2012) - Enjoyable, mostly for seeing all the conversations you thought were unique to you and your spouse on the big screen.  Otherwise, the math of their financial existence is perplexing and distracting.  Giant William-Sonoma house, $25k/year charity giving, BMW + SUV in the drive, Trek bike and full Lance cycling gear -- yet income is a boutique shop losing $12k/mo to shoplifting and a hobby-focused record-label start-up because the dad lost his job at Sony.  The reason it was more troubling than 20-somethings with giant apartments in Manhattan was because money problems were the main plot-point through the film.  It was a little long and Albert Brooks is tiring on screen.  But it's worth the laugh or two. (2/5)

     

    This sort of thing is ubiquitous in Hollywood these days, and it's like all of the romantic comedies out there where a woman has to make a choice between a practical, but slightly boring wealthy professional guy on his way up the corporate ladder or a starving artist guy who appeals more to her emotions...except that the "starving artist" drives a flawlessly restored vintage 1950s Mustang and lives in a trendy loft that would cost 3K a month in the real world.

     

    I heartily recommend the 2000 John Cusack movie, High Fidelity.

     

    High Fidelity, starring Cusack as the burned-out owner of a vintage record store, is one of the few "rom-coms" out there that depicts the financial dynamics of life in an honest and realistic way.  It's also funnier than most anything out there, and the soundtrack is spot-on.

       

      I heartily recommend the 2000 John Cusack movie, High Fidelity.

       

      High Fidelity, starring Cusack as the burned-out owner of a vintage record store, is one of the few "rom-coms" out there that depicts the financial dynamics of life in an honest and realistic way.  It's also funnier than most anything out there, and the soundtrack is spot-on.

       

      I was a big fan of that movie when it came out & watched it again recently on TV; did not love it quite as much as I remembered. I had sort of forgotten what a self-absorbed d!ickhead Cusack's character was. Still worth seeing, especially for the music, the dialogue about music, and the entertainment value of his two record store employees (one of whom was Jack Black, the first time I saw him in anything).

       

      And as long as I'm being a downer - also watched Reservoir Dogs again on TV. I know there are people that worship that film, but I think you have to be a real Tarantino aficionado. Otherwise it's just kind of meh. Or maybe it's just that it pales in comparison to some of his more recent works, e.g. Basterds & Django. And if I were recommending Tarantino films to people, it would also be far behind Pulp Fiction.

      Dave


      Menace to Sobriety

         

        This sort of thing is ubiquitous in Hollywood these days, and it's like all of the romantic comedies out there where a woman has to make a choice between a practical, but slightly boring wealthy professional guy on his way up the corporate ladder or a starving artist guy who appeals more to her emotions...except that the "starving artist" drives a flawlessly restored vintage 1950s Mustang and lives in a trendy loft that would cost 3K a month in the real world.

         

         

         

        Well, you can understand how any woman would swoon over a 1950s Mustang, since they were first released in 1964.

        Janie, today I quit my job. And then I told my boss to go f*** himself, and then I blackmailed him for almost sixty thousand dollars. Pass the asparagus.


        SheCan

           I heartily recommend the 2000 John Cusack movie, High Fidelity.

           

          High Fidelity, starring Cusack as the burned-out owner of a vintage record store, is one of the few "rom-coms" out there that depicts the financial dynamics of life in an honest and realistic way.  It's also funnier than most anything out there, and the soundtrack is spot-on.

           

          This movie is such a classic.  I recently rewatched it also, and remembered just why I really liked it.  For me, it still lived up to my expectations.

           

           

           

          I was a big fan of that movie when it came out & watched it again recently on TV; did not love it quite as much as I remembered. I had sort of forgotten what a self-absorbed d!ickhead Cusack's character was. Still worth seeing, especially for the music, the dialogue about music, and the entertainment value of his two record store employees (one of whom was Jack Black, the first time I saw him in anything).

           

          And as long as I'm being a downer - also watched Reservoir Dogs again on TV. I know there are people that worship that film, but I think you have to be a real Tarantino aficionado. Otherwise it's just kind of meh. Or maybe it's just that it pales in comparison to some of his more recent works, e.g. Basterds & Django. And if I were recommending Tarantino films to people, it would also be far behind Pulp Fiction.

          I totally agree with your evaluation of Reservoir Dogs.  For me, I think Inglorious Bastards would be my top pick.

          Cherie

          "We do not become the people who this world needs simply by turning our backs on anyone we don’t like, trust, or deem healthy enough to be in our presence. "  ---- Shasta Nelson

             

            Well, you can understand how any woman would swoon over a 1950s Mustang, since they were first released in 1964.

            Ahhh...  That'll teach me to pull hypothetical examples off the top of my head.  I was thinking more along the lines of 1950s Plymouth, I guess.

              Today is Alfred Hitchcock's birthday, so celebrate accordingly.

               

              I'm going to watch The Trouble with Harry.   It's been a while since I've seen that one.  If I have time, maybe The 39 Steps or Rear Window after that.

              jimmyb


                Just watched The Little Girl Who Lives Down The Lane (1976) with a young Jodie Foster, Martin Sheen, and Scott Jacoby. Well done.

                It's on Netflix streaming. Foster was probably thirteen when she made it. Excellent actress even then. Martin Sheen at his most skeevy.

                Log    PRs


                Girl Parts

                   

                  This is one of my all-time top five movies.  Dr. No is awesome across the board.  She helped Bond and Quarrel find a place to hide, so she served a purpose.  Aside from looking amazingly beautiful.

                   

                  I was fortunate to see Dr. No and From Russia with Love on a big theater screen last month.  That was such a great experience.

                   

                  We've now worked through From Russia with Love and Goldfinger.   I think I liked Goldfinger the best of the three.  

                   

                  jimmyb


                    Today is a recovery and a movie day. Raining out and 64° here in Atlanta. Perfect movie day.

                     

                    Watched The Grapes Of Wrath with Henry Fonda. Well done. Solid acting. Beautifully filmed in black and white.

                     

                    After that, I needed to balance out my universe with some over-the-top comedy. I finally took the dive and watched Tommy Boy for the first time. I was pleasantly surprised. Chris Farley carried the film and had me laughing uncontrollably a few times, especially that scene in the plane bathroom. Nothing like a pre-911 film where anything goes on an airplane and in an airport.  Farley was a remarkable talent. All I expect from a comedy is a few good belly-laughs, some chuckles, and warm simmering smile, and this movie delivered. The story doesn't matter so much--usual predictable stuff--but Tommy is very funny train wreck.. Cool

                    Log    PRs

                    mab411


                    Proboscis Colossus

                      Today is a recovery and a movie day. Raining out and 64° here in Atlanta. Perfect movie day.

                       

                      Watched The Grapes Of Wrath with Henry Fonda. Well done. Solid acting. Beautifully filmed in black and white.

                       

                      After that, I needed to balance out my universe with some over-the-top comedy. I finally took the dive and watched Tommy Boy for the first time. I was pleasantly surprised. Chris Farley carried the film and had me laughing uncontrollably a few times, especially that scene in the plane bathroom. Nothing like a pre-911 film where anything goes on an airplane and in an airport.  Farley was a remarkable talent. All I expect from a comedy is a few good belly-laughs, some chuckles, and warm simmering smile, and this movie delivered. The story doesn't matter so much--usual predictable stuff--but Tommy is very funny train wreck.. Cool

                      Much like John Candy, Chris Farley was, I think, perfectly capable of rising above the "fat doofus" roles he so often took.  Really too bad he left before we got a chance to see.

                       

                      Also...in terms of sheer comedy, I always liked the chemistry he and David Spade had.

                       

                      I'm currently watching one I remember from back in college, Four Rooms, a montage of three short pieces with "Ted the Bellhop," played by Tim Roth, as the common thread.

                       

                      So far..not as good as I remember.  Though this second story is a lot better than the first, and I remember the last two, by Robert Rodriguez and Quentin Tarantino, being my favorite.

                      "God guides us on our journey, but careful with those feet." - David Lee Roth, of all people

                        Today is a recovery and a movie day. Raining out and 64° here in Atlanta. Perfect movie day.

                         

                        Definitly an ideal movie day here in Atlanta.

                         

                        I watched Dial M for Murder earlier today, and I'm about to watch Psycho.  I'm still having fun revisiting the old Hitchcock films.


                        SheCan

                          Watched The Grapes Of Wrath with Henry Fonda. Well done. Solid acting. Beautifully filmed in black and white.

                           

                           

                          This is one movie that almost lived up to the book.  My grandparents were born just after 1900 in the mid-west (Oklahoma/Arkansas) area.  When I watched the movie, the thing that really stood out to me was how much the movie characters sounded like my  grandparents and their friends had when they were alive.

                           

                          This week my daughter brought home a DVD and asked me to watch it with her.  It was called Catfish, and I'd never heard of it.  Was a documentary, reality type move documenting a young man's online friendship with a precocious 8 year old artist.  As the relationship develops he finds that things don't always add up.  Although, I enjoy my online friends, this made me glad that I don't get that into these virtual relationships.  Apparently they now have an MTV show based on this documentary.

                          Cherie

                          "We do not become the people who this world needs simply by turning our backs on anyone we don’t like, trust, or deem healthy enough to be in our presence. "  ---- Shasta Nelson


                          Interval Junkie --Nobby

                            Springbreakers (2012) -- okay, stay with me here.  This film looks like a tame "girls gone wild" rip-off.  It's not.  Okay, it kinda is.  But that's not the point.  This is actually an art-house flick.  And a pretty good one at that.  More accurately the first half is a very good art-house flick with a introspective look at just what spring break means to many people.  It's spiritual.  The director is offering a good glimpse behind the Bacchanalia into the Beat-like soul of the endeavor.  If you thought "The Beach" captured the spirituality of travelling (until it turned into a 'movie' when the drug-lords showed up), then you might be open to this movie as well.  It has the same problem though: drug-lord shows up (James DeFranco) and it turns into another movie completely -- a left turn to Hollywood.   It's still interesting, but devoid of soul (as is paralleled by the main character from the 'first film" departing).  Anyway, if you're up for a bit of a challenge, try the film and feel free to turn it off when the Christian-girl leaves on the bus. (4/5)

                            2014 Goals:  sub-3 Marathon 

                            Current Status 08/28: Slowly working back up from a pelvic stress fracture.  4mil distance PR w00t!


                            SheCan

                              Springbreakers (2012) -- okay, stay with me here.  This film looks like a tame "girls gone wild" rip-off.  It's not.  Okay, it kinda is.  But that's not the point.  This is actually an art-house flick.  And a pretty good one at that.  More accurately the first half is a very good art-house flick with a introspective look at just what spring break means to many people.  It's spiritual.  The director is offering a good glimpse behind the Bacchanalia into the Beat-like soul of the endeavor.  If you thought "The Beach" captured the spirituality of travelling (until it turned into a 'movie' when the drug-lords showed up), then you might be open to this movie as well.  It has the same problem though: drug-lord shows up (James DeFranco) and it turns into another movie completely -- a left turn to Hollywood.   It's still interesting, but devoid of soul (as is paralleled by the main character from the 'first film" departing).  Anyway, if you're up for a bit of a challenge, try the film and feel free to turn it off when the Christian-girl leaves on the bus. (4/5)

                               

                              Okay, you made a good stab at making it sound appealing, but, I just don't think I can even give it a chance.  Sorry, I just can't.  Remember that scene in 1993's Addam's Family where Wednesday is forced to watch Disney movies?

                              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Nkzbr-JaJU

                              Cherie

                              "We do not become the people who this world needs simply by turning our backs on anyone we don’t like, trust, or deem healthy enough to be in our presence. "  ---- Shasta Nelson


                              paranoid weirdo

                                 

                                Okay, you made a good stab at making it sound appealing, but, I just don't think I can even give it a chance.  Sorry, I just can't.  Remember that scene in 1993's Addam's Family where Wednesday is forced to watch Disney movies?

                                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Nkzbr-JaJU

                                 

                                I haven't seen Spring Breakers yet but I'm a fan of some of Harmony Korine's other movies.  He is pretty much the opposite of Disney, an unflinching eye on the ugly and grotesque side of humanity.  I think Wednesday would love Gummo.