How to pick a dog who's a running companion (Read 1038 times)

    Animal shelter kill rates vary but 40% is typical.  If you adopt from a high kill rate shelter or a rescue group, you have either saved that dogs life or allowed the shelter/group to rescue another dog.  If you buy from a breeder, you are only encouraging the breeder to make more.  The supply of available dogs grossly exceeds the demand.

     

     

    Instead of trying to making folks feel guilty to take on someone else responsibility, how about just focusing on getting folks to take responsibility for their dogs in the first place.  The ideal situation to me is for animal shelters to not even be around because folks properly care for their pets and not ditch them at an animal shelter.  The dog that I'm going to spend my time and energy training and keeping around my child is going to be bred to do what I want and have the temperament that I want.  The breeders that I've purchased from have had waiting lists, not a glut of puppies that they couldn't get sold.  There is a huge difference in a properly bred dog and some "purebred" listed on craigslist for $200.

    Age: 46 Weight: 208 Height: 6'2" (Goal weight 195)

    Current PR's:  Mara 3:48:09; HM 1:43:26; 10K 44:51; 5K 21:27

      My husband and I are both runners and we have a shepherd mix.  My husband runs with him most days and they covered more than 1000 miles together last year at about 8:00 pace.   He's 9 now and still going strong.

       

      In our area (PacNW), shepherd mixes are everywhere in shelters.  When ours was younger, we'd go to the dog park frequently and see many other rescued shepherd mixes that seemed very similar in temperament to ours.  Ours is 62 pounds and does well in weather up to about 80 degrees, though where we live, temperatures that warm are rare.

       

      So yeah - I vote for a shepherd mix, unless you live someplace really warm.

       

        My wife works in veterinary medicine.  We see the overpopulation problem first-hand.  Even "responsible breeders" have problems, primarily with genetic disorders.  For most people, shelter overcrowding and kill rates are out of sight and out of mind.  For the vast majority of people, the specific traits of a purebred are completely irrelevant.  It is a free country and you can do what you will, just as I will make strong statements to create awareness of this problem.

         

         

        Instead of trying to making folks feel guilty

        2013 H1:  7 hours/week base.  Q3: Train for goal race.  Q4:  Goal Race.

        valerienv


        Thread killer ..

          My Weimaraner is now 11 he still goes to about 4 miles . My ACD ( Australian Cattle Dog aka Queensland , Blue Heeler , Queensland Heeler , Dingo ) is 2 1/2 and  up to 10+ he has no trouble with that and I have no doubt he'll continue to increase his mileage . Both came to me via their purebred rescue . I have had both breeds before , both are high strung and need lots of busy activity to be happy but would make good running partners

           

          xor


            Oh.  "Spade and neuter your pets".

             

            All my dogs and cats during my adult life have been rescues.  Two of the dogs were purebred.

             

            Some of the people on this very board are breeders or have relatives who are.  I think before we continue the generalizations, it might be handy to realize that you are perhaps (unintentionally?) personalizing stuff for/to a few folks here that you do not have facts on regarding these specific people and how much they probably care for their animals.  The people I have in mind are conscientious, responsible, kind, etc etc and in no way puppy mill monsters nor even poopy poopfaces.

             

               

               Bird hunting is more like a human playing soccer football than running.

               

              ftfy

              That is an opinion, not a fact.

              And I vehemently disagree.

               

              (no commercials in soccer)

              Ricky

              —our ability to perform up to our physiological potential in a race is determined by whether or not we truly psychologically believe that what we are attempting is realistic. Anton Krupicka

                He's the best combination of fun, playful, ready to go, but will snuggle and chill too. He needs regular exercise, but if for some reason, I'm not running, a walk or romp in the yard work too.

                 

                Our dog Jet has been an absolute joy to have around and a great running buddy.

                 

                See, this sounds perfect, as does Tammy's - "Always ready to go . . . but on rainy days when I don't want to head out, they are content to play some tug-of-war in the house or just chill for a day."  Sign me up for that.  I just wish I knew how to be more confident that's what I can get.  Too much to ask when talking about another living creature, I guess.

                 

                MJ5, yours is such a cutie too, as is the one in the background.


                Rungry!

                  I've been considering getting a four-legged running partner, and this thread has been very helpful! My wire fox terrier just turned 15 and has a hard time getting around the block, but I suspect she would've been a great  runner back in the day. We are starting a family, and have allergies.

                  To sum it up, we are looking for:

                  1. Child-friendly

                  2. non-shedding

                  3. running partner

                  Anyone have any experience with Standard Poodles?

                  Jen

                     

                    See, this sounds perfect, as does Tammy's - "Always ready to go . . . but on rainy days when I don't want to head out, they are content to play some tug-of-war in the house or just chill for a day."  Sign me up for that.  I just wish I knew how to be more confident that's what I can get.  Too much to ask when talking about another living creature, I guess.

                     

                    MJ5, yours is such a cutie too, as is the one in the background.

                    it is hard to know what you'll get. Some labs are very high energy. Others can chill. I think that's another reason why I try to urge people to go to a shelter. Generally shelter dogs are a year or older and their personalities and energy levels are evident. And if they've been at the shelter for even a few wks, the workers there will have a good feel for their temperment and will have a pretty good sense about whether a particular dog is a good fit for your family and your activity level.

                    Tammy

                    ap4


                      If you're going the breeder route and a large breed where hip dysplasia (Shepherds, labs, etc) is an issue, making sure the parents are OFA certified isn't a bad idea either.  It's not a guarantee, but may make bad hips less likely.  This also indicate a breeder that cares about the quality of the line.   I've seen hips so bad that the dogs can hardly walk without pain at 11 months, much less run.

                        Anyone have any experience with Standard Poodles?

                         

                        No direct personal experience--but I see lots of people running with their dogs here and I have never, ever seen a poodle (or even something that looked like a poodle mix) of any sort running with anyone.  Not to say it's impossible, but they wouldn't be the first breed I'd peg as a good running companion.

                        NHLA


                          I've been considering getting a four-legged running partner, and this thread has been very helpful! My wire fox terrier just turned 15 and has a hard time getting around the block, but I suspect she would've been a great  runner back in the day. We are starting a family, and have allergies.

                          To sum it up, we are looking for:

                          1. Child-friendly

                          2. non-shedding

                          3. running partner

                          Anyone have any experience with Standard Poodles

                          Poodles are great runners, swimmers, and they love to play in the snow.  The problem with poodles is they are so smart.

                            If you're going the breeder route and a large breed where hip dysplasia (Shepherds, labs, etc) is an issue, making sure the parents are OFA certified isn't a bad idea either.  It's not a guarantee, but may make bad hips less likely.  This also indicate a breeder that cares about the quality of the line.   I've seen hips so bad that the dogs can hardly walk without pain at 11 months, much less run.

                             

                            Shepherd mixes are a great alternative to shepherds in terms of avoiding hip problems.

                              For the vast majority of people, the specific traits of a purebred are completely irrelevant.  It is a free country and you can do what you will, just as I will make strong statements to create awareness of this problem.

                               

                               

                              I think your blame for the overpopulation is misdirected onto breeders.  I also think an individual has a right to decide what's important and maybe if people took more time to consider what's important to them in their dog breed (like the intent of this thread) we wouldn't have such an issue with overpopulation.

                               

                              I understand the point of your strong statements but there's no need for hyperbole.

                               

                              As an aside, thanks for posting the pictures of all your dogs.  Great looking, all of them.  Really enjoyed kentrose's shepherd mix, he looks like a great buddy.

                              "Good-looking people have no spine. Their art never lasts. They get the girls, but we're smarter." - Lester Bangs
                              FSBD


                                I am a big proponent of rescue dogs.  Both of mine are rescues.  I think they have an old soul compared to dogs that come from a breeder.  They seem to have such good hearts and are very loyal.  I have nothing against people who go to responsible breeders, I just personally have had really good luck with my rescues and will continue to go that route.

                                Here are my two dogs.  Can you tell which one is a good running partner and which one just wants to stop and smell the roses?