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Lost jogger feared he would die on mountain (Read 799 times)

    The headline says it all: Lost jogger feared he would die on mountain

     

    How to make a 20+ km weekend run last 2 days and 2 nights.

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10856760

    Running - cheaper than therapy

      Well, there's something to ponder. Is it better to...?

       

      1. Spend two nights lost on a mountain and force 95 rescue searchers and 3 helicopters to look for you.

       

      or

       

      2. Buy a fricking Garmin.

      Runner100


        Damn joggers, that would never have happened to a runner.

           

          2. Buy a fricking Garmin.

           

          Agreed.   I don't own one personally, but I run in Suburbia.  If I ever took to the woods in a new place for a long run, I would certainly buy one for that kind of running.  It is incredibly easy to lose all sense of direction when in the woods. (Especially us guys. We don't even navigate well when the route is marked!)

          The Plan '15 (big parts)→  Feb:  Va Beach Distance Series 50K (Set a PR)     /// April:  Hampton, VA 24 Hour Run for Cancer  (Goal: >80.1+Miles for a PR)  ///    "Run Hard, Live Easy."   ∞


          Loves the outdoors

            I've been tramping in these tracks and it's rugged terrain. He's a lucky guy. Listening to the news, I had thought he was most likely dead. Very relieved to hear he was ok. he must have descended the wrong ridge when up on the tops, which is easy to do in bad weather. A garmin may have helped, but would have been useless without a map. Having played around with mine on the tops in there, it was often hard to pick which ridge you were actually on, even with the garmin to help. If you really want to be safer in that sort of area on your own you should run with an emergency locator beacon.

            One day I decided I wanted to become a runner, so I did.


            sugnim

              Well, there's something to ponder. Is it better to...?

               

              1. Spend two nights lost on a mountain and force 95 rescue searchers and 3 helicopters to look for you.

               

              or

               

              2. Buy a fricking Garmin.

               

              3.  Use a map.

              4.  Run in familiar places.

              5. Run with a more experienced friend.

                 

                3.  Use a map.

                4.  Run in familiar places.

                5. Run with a more experienced friend.

                 

                You really should never go off into the wilderness by yourself. I could very well have been a headline as well.

                 

                I went fly in fishing with a bunch of guys in Northern Ontario. It was early May and night time temps fell below freezing. I went out in a small 5 HP boat. My friends stayed at the cabin and basically were drinking their brains out. Darkness was approaching and I had drifted with the wind to the far end of a small lake which had a marshy shoreline. I went to start the motor and the pull cord broke. I was able to start the motor with my bare hands. A freakin miracle as far as I'm concerned.

                "The drops of rain make a hole in the stone, not by violence, but by oft falling." - Lucretius


                Loves the outdoors

                   

                  You really should never go off into the wilderness by yourself. I could very well have been a headline as well.

                   

                  I went fly in fishing with a bunch of guys in Northern Ontario. It was early May and night time temps fell below freezing. I went out in a small 5 HP boat. My friends stayed at the cabin and basically were drinking their brains out. Darkness was approaching and I had drifted with the wind to the far end of a small lake which had a marshy shoreline. I went to start the motor and the pull cord broke. I was able to start the motor with my bare hands. A freakin miracle as far as I'm concerned.

                   

                  Yes, the smallest mistake in these types of environments can have enormous consequences. Good to hear you had your miracle.

                   

                  i've also often thought when I've been out running trails, that it's much easier to make navigational errors when you're running rather than walking. There is less time to think and i guess you are more impatient to keep moving. Doing mountain running in really rugged terrain where you need to be really concentrating on route finding, must be that much more risky. Add in bad weather and it becomes dangerous.

                  One day I decided I wanted to become a runner, so I did.

                    I've been tramping in these tracks and it's rugged terrain. He's a lucky guy. Listening to the news, I had thought he was most likely dead. Very relieved to hear he was ok. he must have descended the wrong ridge when up on the tops, which is easy to do in bad weather. A garmin may have helped, but would have been useless without a map. Having played around with mine on the tops in there, it was often hard to pick which ridge you were actually on, even with the garmin to help. If you really want to be safer in that sort of area on your own you should run with an emergency locator beacon.

                     

                    I don't know off the top of my head which models have which features, but my 405 has "back to start." It will make you backtrack over your entire route to get there, but since this guy was only going about 12 miles it wouldn't have been a huge deal to retrace his steps. Or he could have saved his starting location and the GPS would have navigated him directly back there, but in rugged terrain and/or places where rivers might get in the way, "back to start" might be the surer way to go even if it takes longer.


                    Imminent Catastrophe

                      Yes, Back to Start is a useful feature, a "friend" of mine has used it.

                      "Able to function despite imminent catastrophe"

                       "To obtain the air that angels breathe you must come to Tahoe"--Mark Twain

                      "The most common question from potential entrants is 'I do not know if I can do this' to which I usually answer, 'that's the whole point'.--Paul Charteris, Tarawera Ultramarathon RD.

                       

                      √ Tahoe Rim Trail 100M 20/21 July 2013

                      Boston Marathon 21 April 2014

                      Tahoe Rim Trail 100M 19/20 July 2014

                        I just started training for my first trail 50K and the one thing I always do is run with others that are familiar with the trails.  Way to easy to get lost.