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Weight Gain Powder (Read 138 times)


Old , Ugly and slow

    I f you are not lifting weights then more weight means adding fat.

    You should be able to buy some weights for a few hundred look on craigslist.

    i would start with twice a week lifting.

    You have a limit to how much you can run and still gain muscle.

    first race sept 1977 last race sept 2007

     

    2014goals   1300  miles  , 190 pounds , deadlift 400 touch my toes

      What is your prioriy?Better running/race performaance or general fitness and to look more muscular? As much as I am a proponent of resistance training, I will say that a lot of added weight (fat or muscle) will slow you down and reduce your max VO2. If thin and weak, yes some added muscle/strength can be of benefit.

      Those who try, fail! Those who do what it takes to succeed, succeed!!

        What is your prioriy?Better running/race performaance or general fitness and to look more muscular? As much as I am a proponent of resistance training, I will say that a lot of added weight (fat or muscle) will slow you down and reduce your max VO2. If thin and weak, yes some added muscle/strength can be of benefit.

        Those who try, fail! Those who do what it takes to succeed, succeed!!


        Not dead. Yet.

          I am not a hard gainer, but either way it's hard to gain muscle and you have to work at it.  If you just eat a bunch of calories without do lots of lifting, you are just going to get fat and I don't think those are the results you are looking for.  You either need to spend a fair amount of time researching lifting and how to gain or hire a trainer who can help you get there.  That's definitely not cheap though.

           

          You might also need to cut back on running while building, so you don't just burn off all the calories you are trying to turn into muscle.  I guess the point is that it can definitely be done, but you need to know what you are doing and work as hard at it as you normally do with your running.

           

          Slo Hands point is valid too.  Just like running  you need to start slow and build up to harder and harder workouts even if you feel like you could do more.  Finally, how you do the sets...how many sets, how much weight can somewhat determine what happens to the tissue as it is created.  I think going heavy and hard with low sets will make you stronger with more dense muscle tissue.  Doing higher amounts of sets with a little less weight will make the muscles swell up a bit more, but they won't be as dense.  Not even sure if it's recommended to do high rep low weight anymore.  They used to say that it helped you cut, but I have seen conflicting info on that.

           

          You can do a lot with a couple of adjustable weight dumbells and a cheap bench or two.  Set it up in the garage and go to town.  Check out Arnold's, "The Encyclopedia of Modern Bodybuilding".  It covers just about everything and has a whole section on gaining and how to eat for it.

          How can we know our limits if we don't test them?

          cookiemonster


          Connoisseur of Cookies

            You're 6'4" and weigh 163.  Your BMI is 19.8.  You are very safely within the healthy range of height to weight.  You are not overweight.  You are not underweight.  You're in a good place.  Seriously.

             

            Please be very careful with supplements you buy from anywhere.  Research them thoroughly and know what's in them.  Know what those ingredients can do to you and the damage they can cause.  In many cases supplements are little more than a growing hole in your wallet.

             

            The best way to stabilize your weight is to eat properly.  This means eating the right foods and eating enough of them.  You're exercising more and have noted a few pounds of weight loss.  This means you need to be eating more.  More fruits, more vegetables and more lean meats are what you need... not a powder.

             

            If you can swing it make an appointment with a Registered Dietician (not a "nutritionist"... there is a difference).  One with some knowledge of exercise science would be even better.  Talk about your current diet.  Talk about your goals.  Talk about why you want to weight 180 lbs.  (Why do you want to weight 180 lbs???)  Set a plan for getting there.

             

            Also, consider keeping a food diary.  List out what you eat, how much and how often.  This can help track your intake versus a rough measure of output.  If you have a smart phone many people I encounter through work seem to like the app call MyFitnessPal for this kind of thing.  I've played with it and it's pretty easy to use.  You can track what you eat, how much, scan bar codes of what you eat, track exercise minutes all to see how they balance out with one another.

             

            Keeping a food diary will also help should you choose to go see a Registered Dietician.

             

            Good luck.

            ***************************************************************************************

             

            "C" is for cookie.  That's good enough for me.


            Am I doing this right?

               

              Donuts and beer work much better.

               

               

              You must not be drinking enough.  I don't need donuts or M's.

              No excuses....

              ckerr1999


                Thanks. I have never calculated my BMI till now. So that puts things in perspective. I also have a very bad habit of skipping meals on the weekend. Sometimes on Sat. and Sun. I will skip breakfast, then skip lunch and then just eat an early dinner. I think I need to break that habit. And give up drinking too much coffee....I spend way to much money at Starbucks...

                 

                 

                 

                 

                cookiemonster


                Connoisseur of Cookies

                  Thanks. I have never calculated my BMI till now. So that puts things in perspective. I also have a very bad habit of skipping meals on the weekend. Sometimes on Sat. and Sun. I will skip breakfast, then skip lunch and then just eat an early dinner. I think I need to break that habit. And give up drinking too much coffee....I spend way to much money at Starbucks...

                   

                  Not skipping meals will probably help.  Just make sure when you eat you're eating the right kinds of foods and not a bunch of junk.  Lots of fruits, veggies and some lean meats.

                   

                  How much do you spend at Starbucks a day?  A week?  A month?

                   

                  Seriously, you don't need powders or supplements to stabilize your weight.  You just need to work on making better food choices.  Also take comfort in the fact that with regards to making better food choices you are not alone.  Lots of people need to work on improving this aspect of their life.

                  ***************************************************************************************

                   

                  "C" is for cookie.  That's good enough for me.

                    I've been itching to hijack this thread, so here I go... What food do you recommend if I'm pretty much eating all I care to eat? I don't want to eat more because it'll feel like I'm force-feeding myself (I already am), so I assume the way to increase my calorie intake is to switch in some high-calorie/energy-dense (whatever the proper term is) food? Or is that not the right direction?

                     

                    My stats: 38, 5'9", ~122lbs (didn't break 120 until I started running and eating more a couple years back). Typical diet: breakfast = several slices of whole grain bread plus a bottle of ensure, lunch/dinner = bowls of rice/pasta with some random meat and veggies, late night snacks = more noodles/potatoes and such. Random snack throughout the day (crackers, instant noodles, chips, soda, bananas...)


                    Old , Ugly and slow

                      Gain muscle =  squats or deadlifts and drink milk

                      first race sept 1977 last race sept 2007

                       

                      2014goals   1300  miles  , 190 pounds , deadlift 400 touch my toes

                      FTYC


                      Faster Than Your Couch!

                        I agree with Cookie monster.

                         

                        And a word of caution on the protein: Way too much protein (0.8g per kg of lean body mass are recommended, and for athletes who train hard, 1.0-1.2 g/kg of lean body mass), like 300g/day as someone mentioned, can lead to severe malnutrition and promote osteoporosis, even in young athletes.

                         

                        To maintain your weight while upping your exercise regimen, you should rather add carbohydrates, or simply eat more of a healthy, mixed diet, and not shift the focus to one particular group of nutrients (e.g. protein, or carbohydrates alone). That might not be what someone suggests who is in the body-building business, because eating a very strict protein-focused diet probably promotes muscle buildup a bit more than eating a mixed, healthy diet (most of the muscle gain comes from weight lifting, though), but the protein-focused diet is not healthy.

                        Building a lot of muscle and minimizing body fat might be attractive, but it is not healthy, even if it looks "good".

                        Run for fun.

                          I bought my nephew an elephant for his room. He said, "Thanks". I said, "Don't mention it".

                            I'd just say: don't look at the number. Run and do some strength training. If your weight goes up because you add muscle that's OK and if your weight goes down becasue you're getting fitter that is OK too. Just eat and exercise to feel good/healthy and not to hit any specific number.

                              I've been itching to hijack this thread, so here I go... What food do you recommend if I'm pretty much eating all I care to eat? I don't want to eat more because it'll feel like I'm force-feeding myself (I already am), so I assume the way to increase my calorie intake is to switch in some high-calorie/energy-dense (whatever the proper term is) food? Or is that not the right direction?

                               

                              My stats: 38, 5'9", ~122lbs (didn't break 120 until I started running and eating more a couple years back). Typical diet: breakfast = several slices of whole grain bread plus a bottle of ensure, lunch/dinner = bowls of rice/pasta with some random meat and veggies, late night snacks = more noodles/potatoes and such. Random snack throughout the day (crackers, instant noodles, chips, soda, bananas...)

                               

                               

                              An easy way would be to add some peanut butter to that toast, some peanuts/cashews to the rice and veggies. Drink milk or juice with meals instead of water. Cook with more oil than you're used to. Instead of a plain potato, have a potato with butter or sour cream or if you want to be more nutritious, some baked beans or something.

                                 

                                Donuts and beer work much better.

                                 

                                Does this really work? As for me, for a better weight gain, increase protein in take. Though most of the time, if we want to gain weight, we can get a common answer, eat a lot. We can eat food with fats but in a minimal quantity.

                                we should prioritize our health and body. my site

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