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Running / Training (Read 388 times)

Stop N Go


    I have a question about whether I am doing the right training at this stage of my running life.

     

    I've been running since May and slowly working up my mileage per week.  Currently about 20 mpw, 4 days running, 2 other sport, 1 day complete rest.

     

    Most runs are in the 8:40 pace with longer runs about 9:00.  Edited to add that this pace is about 141HR and 80% of my MaxHR since otherwise it doesn't tell you the effort involved.  Almost everyone has a plan with hard, easy, long, fast runs each week.  I'm trying to build a base now but should I also be incorporating these different runs now or just wait a few months until I've upped my mileage more?

    5k PR Oct 2012 - 23:20

    5k Goal 2013 - 21:5x

      What are you trying to do with your running?

       

      Those running "plans" usually involve people who have a race goal, or a goal of getting faster at some distance, etc.

       

      Why are you running?

      Come all you no-hopers, you jokers and rogues
      We're on the road to nowhere, let's find out where it goes
      Stop N Go


        Good question, Kevin.  I should have mentioned it in my first post.

         

        I was 44 years old about 30lbs overweight in May and so started running, along with eating better.  I've run four 5ks best time 23:20 and one 8k.

         

        I'd like to be fast (5 - 10k distance) but I don't have race planned in the near future for which to train specifically. 

        5k PR Oct 2012 - 23:20

        5k Goal 2013 - 21:5x

        ehunter


          All depends on your goals.  After 7 months, you should have a pretty decent base, especially if your goal is aimed towards 5-10K.  If you're wanting to go longer, then things would change somewhat, particulary in the miles per week area.

           

          Looks like you have a good plan with 4 days running, cross-training, etc.  I think at this point in time, especially if you're gearing towards a shorter race, you should begin implementing some tempo and speed-type training sessions.  Start on the low end (speed 4x400x200)/(tempo 2x5minx2min) etc and build upwards.  If you're training by heartrate, just follow your appropriate guidelines  for each workout.  My max is similar to yours, and my tempo workouts typically place my HR around the mid 160s, while speed workouts put it around the mid 170s.  I'd suggest building your workouts around threshold heartrate rather than max heartrate. 

           

          edit after reading your last post: Great story.  Congrats on the lifestyle change - keep it up.  Also, find a race to train for.  Nothing will motivate you like having something to work towards.  If your time is in the 23 minute range and you haven't really trained yourself to be fast, then you definately have the ability to be very fast. At this point, the best advice I can give you is to keep it fun and enjoyable.  Have fun and appreciate the ability to run and be healthy. 

            I have a question about whether I am doing the right training at this stage of my running life.

             

            I've been running since May and slowly working up my mileage per week.  Currently about 20 mpw, 4 days running, 2 other sport, 1 day complete rest.

             

            Most runs are in the 8:40 pace with longer runs about 9:00.  Edited to add that this pace is about 141HR and 80% of my MaxHR since otherwise it doesn't tell you the effort involved.  Almost everyone has a plan with hard, easy, long, fast runs each week.  I'm trying to build a base now but should I also be incorporating these different runs now or just wait a few months until I've upped my mileage more?

            It is a good idea to fluctuate distances and efforts of your runs.  I don't know how you're putting in your weekly runs but if you're running 20MPW with 4-days-a-week, it would be a good idea to do something like, say: 7~9 miles; 3 miles; 5~6 miles; 4 miles...something like that.  Your 7~9 mile run should be done at easy effort; 3 would be just a recovery jog and don't even worry about how slow you're moving; 5~6 would be a decent effort but not too fast, perhaps only slightly faster then your long run; throw 2 mile tempo-ish run during the 4-mile run...  Something like that.  You seem to be fairly fit to be able to push sub-9 for a 5-mile average each run.  I wouldn't worry too much about trying to run much faster but try to slow down a bit so you won't be struggling your long run.  23:30 for 5 ain't bad at all but, for that, 8:40 pace is too aggressive.  At this point, 8:40~9:00 pace should be kept for your tempo-ish run.  Actually, at this point, during the developmental stage, your target should be how far/long you can go; not how fast.  That will come later.  Some may suggest you not to exceed 20% of your weekly mileage for your long run but, as you can see, if you're running only 4 times a week, it's hard not to.  It's impossible to keep your long run 20% of your weekly mileage--that would be less than your average run and that would be mathematical impossibility.  The idea is correct but that "rule" should be applied to someone who is running everyday.  In other words, think of what weekly mileage you WOULD be running with that average if you're running everyday.  In you case, if you are averaging 5-miles a day; then your 7-days-a-week estimate would be 35 miles.  So 20% of THAT, which is 7, should be your target long run distance.  

             

            Actually, my suggestion would be to slow it down to more like 10-minute per mile; which would put you 70-minutes mark.  Try to bring it up to 90-minutes as your long run.  If you are running 5-mile and you're running at 9-minute pace, then it's 45 minutes.  That's actually too short for some of the vital developments to occur.  You want to shoot for 1:30~2:00 range if possible.  This is your AEROBIC capacity in general.  Some may only look at VO2Max but it is not correct.  You will get VO2Max development pretty much equal amount by doing long run or intervals.  But you cannot substitute long run, duration of somewhere around 1:30 to 2:00, with short but hard runs.  Long continuous runs are best way to develop capillary beds as well as the size and the number of mitochondria which is where the energy source is actually converted into "energy".  

             

            HR os 140 for your regular run doesn't seem high but 80% of Max HR seems high.  I don't know how you checked your Max HR but ideally you want to keep it probably more like 70% of Max.  There are number of different ways to measure your max, or target, HR.  

             

            Try to run as much hills and uneven terrains as you can.  Don't worry about pace when you do that; just go by how you feel.  This would help develop natural form as well as strengthen your legs; which would help you develop "speed" later on.  Just remember; what you are doing right now would pay off 6 months from now.  Don't rush it.  Don't rush to the idea of; "If you want to run fast, train fast."  That's been proven wrong over and over again.