First time I've ever been ticketed while running in Chicago (Read 1479 times)

     

     

    Exactly. Attitude is everything.

     

    Would you really want to work for a company that wouldn't give you the benefit of doubt over something this trivial?

     

    The whole interview process is to see how well you play with others. Most places wouldn't start the background check until you've passed the first interview stage, anyway.

    The whole process is to single would be employees out with.  And having a criminal background is not going to going to win me any Brownie points.   In fact today I had an interview for a government position, and I told them that I do have a criminal record, even though I'm still not sure of it.  And nobody wants to help me discover if I really do. Thus this problem plus all my other problems is making a wreck out of me now.

      The whole process is to single would be employees out with.  And having a criminal background is not going to going to win me any Brownie points.   In fact today I had an interview for a government position, and I told them that I do have a criminal record, even though I'm still not sure of it.  And nobody wants to help me discover if I really do. Thus this problem plus all my other problems is making a wreck out of me now.

       

      There is an answer to this, though, and you can find it out.  Have you read all the pieces of paper you got at or from the court?  Have you asked your lawyer?  If you mentioned upthread what the actual formal disposition of your case was, I missed it.  I know you got community service, but it wouldn't surprise me if you got something like community service with an otherwise suspended sentence, to be dismissed following x number of months of keeping your nose clean.  In which case, you wouldn't end up with a criminal record.

       

      Does that count as someone helping you find out if you really do?

       

      And, don't despair, I have a friend who got a government job even though he had an arrest record for "mutilation of public foliage."

         

        There is an answer to this, though, and you can find it out.  Have you read all the pieces of paper you got at or from the court?  Have you asked your lawyer?  If you mentioned upthread what the actual formal disposition of your case was, I missed it.  I know you got community service, but it wouldn't surprise me if you got something like community service with an otherwise suspended sentence, to be dismissed following x number of months of keeping your nose clean.  In which case, you wouldn't end up with a criminal record.

         

        Does that count as someone helping you find out if you really do?

         

        And, don't despair, I have a friend who got a government job even though he had an arrest record for "mutilation of public foliage."

        My lawyer told me this won't appear on what was my non existent criminal record.   I don't understand how that can be though since I was sentenced to a fine or community service.

          In fact today I had an interview for a government position, and I told them that I do have a criminal record, even though I'm still not sure of it.

           

          My lawyer told me this won't appear on what was my non existent criminal record.

          Why are you telling prospective employers you have a criminal record when your attorney informed you that you do not?  You aren't lying if you rely on his legal counsel (unless/until he's proven wrong).

          “Everything you need is already inside.” -- Bill Bowerman

            You will never get a job if you make as big a deal out of it during the interview as you have here.  Seek advice from an expert in employment law in your state on whether or not they can ask and whether or not you need to disclose this, and if there are any differences in strategy between local government, federal government, and private industry.

             

            If you do disclose it, and you are asked about it, have a carefully rehearsed answer to the question, a sentence or two at most.  Answering in such a way that shows you can accept consequences and move on with your life is the best.  If you spend 10 minutes belaboring the point, they will think you are incapable of accepting feedback or reprimands.

             

            It may be possible to get the arrest and conviction expunged from your record, or to have your record sealed.  In NM, our twat governor has twice vetoed bills to create a process for a misdemeanor arrest+conviction just like this to be expunged, in spite of the fact that most other states have such a process. It was all over local news a couple months ago because a lot of people here have a single arrest and/or no conviction but can't get jobs because government is one of the biggest employers. Again, contact a lawyer who specializes in that area of expertise.

            2013 H1:  7 hours/week base.  Q3: Train for goal race.  Q4:  Goal Race.


            Am I doing this right?

               

              You fail to understand though that this is a runners message board and what happened to me is certainly related to running.  If your dog died, I'm sorry to hear that but those are the problems that shouldn't be shared here.  

               

              Actually, if my dog died I would most certainly share it here, and probably start a thread about it.

               

              He is the best running partner I could have.  Never fails to show up for a run.  Always excited and ready to get running.  Very encouraging and persuasive to go out for a run if it looks like I'm going to skip.  Lets me talk about whatever I want to talk about.  Points out wildlife, both dead and alive.  Always willing to let me go at whatever pace I want to run that day.  He even occasionally trespasses where he shouldn't be.  Luckily we've never received a citation.

              No excuses....

              JimR


                If you do disclose it, and you are asked about it, have a carefully rehearsed answer to the question, a sentence or two at most.  Answering in such a way that shows you can accept consequences and move on with your life is the best.  If you spend 10 minutes belaboring the point, they will think you are incapable of accepting feedback or reprimands.

                 

                This.  How you handle such things is very important in the eyes of prospective employers.

                GabrielleB


                  Curiosity finally got the better of me so I finally opened this never-ending thread. I'm only on Page 11. I can't even imagine what else comes down the pipe in 15+ pages! Classic. Couch potatoes wish their lives were so entertaining. Smile

                   

                  eta: 25+ pages!! Surprised

                    You will never get a job if you make as big a deal out of it during the interview as you have here.  Seek advice from an expert in employment law in your state on whether or not they can ask and whether or not you need to disclose this, and if there are any differences in strategy between local government, federal government, and private industry.

                     

                    If you do disclose it, and you are asked about it, have a carefully rehearsed answer to the question, a sentence or two at most.  Answering in such a way that shows you can accept consequences and move on with your life is the best.  If you spend 10 minutes belaboring the point, they will think you are incapable of accepting feedback or reprimands.

                     

                    It may be possible to get the arrest and conviction expunged from your record, or to have your record sealed.  In NM, our twat governor has twice vetoed bills to create a process for a misdemeanor arrest+conviction just like this to be expunged, in spite of the fact that most other states have such a process. It was all over local news a couple months ago because a lot of people here have a single arrest and/or no conviction but can't get jobs because government is one of the biggest employers. Again, contact a lawyer who specializes in that area of expertise.

                    Cuz I interviewed with a government agency yesterday who can pull up your criminal record at the snap of a finger.    I printed out the story that FOX did on me and gave them a print copy of it.  I even told them they're welcomed to watch it on the internet. Just so they can understand I'm not the crook Metra makes me out to be Sad

                      I printed out the story that FOX did on me and gave them a print copy of it.  I even told them they're welcomed to watch it on the internet.

                       

                      Seriously, what message do you think that conveys to the person interviewing you?  That you are completely innocent and have been wronged by the system?  The reality is that, for most interviewers, it will convey that you do not respond well at all to criticism, where you will try to build a case as to why you are right and someone else is wrong.  I have interviewed a lot of people and negativity is definitely one of the red flags that I watch for.

                       

                      Next time, try this:

                       

                      Interviewer:  "I see that you put down that you have a misdemeanor trespassing charge against you.  Can you tell me what that was about?"

                       

                      Red Bird:  "I jogging near railroad tracks and didn't realize I was intruding on the right-of-way. METRA had been having problems with people on the tracks in that area and so they were ticketing everyone that encroached into the right-of-way.  I didn't think I was doing anything wrong but I know better now."

                       

                      Keep it simple, plausible, and neutral.  It doesn't have to match how you really feel about it, you just have to represent it for what it really is: a factor that will have no effect on your job performance if you are hired.

                      2013 H1:  7 hours/week base.  Q3: Train for goal race.  Q4:  Goal Race.


                      Not dead. Yet.

                        Just had to share the ad displayed beside this thread.

                         

                        Red Bird?

                        How can we know our limits if we don't test them?

                          Red bird, if antidepressants don't work for you, have you tried seeing a psychologist or psychiatrist? A social  worker may not have the required skills to deal with depression and suicidal ideations.

                           

                          To the rest of you trying to offer advice and saying it's no big deal, I think you're doing it from a perspective of someone who currently is not depressed. Depression makes you angry. You don't feel in control. Seemingly small confrontations get stuck in your head and get replayed over and over. These ruminations make you a prisoner of your own mind. It is extremely difficult to extricate yourself from such a position without help. While some of the advice may be applicable and useful to someone without depression, it may have a different effect on someone who does.

                           

                          I have requested to have this thread closed down before, but not because Redbird had suicidal ideations, but because of the bad advice he was receiving. If you are untrained on how to deal with depression or suicidal thoughts, I ask that you refrain from offering advice. You may be worsening the situation. (And I note that I'm not a professional in this matter - I've had to deal with depression personally. I've also had someone who worked directly for me who had suicidal thoughts. The only advice I can offer Redbird is to seek professional assistance, not to get over it or move on).

                          +100000000

                          'No matter how slow you go, you're still lapping everyone on the couch'

                           

                          "Running is a big question mark that's there each and every day. It asks you, 'Are you going to be a wimp or are you going to be strong today?'"  - Peter Maher

                           

                          "Running long and hard is an ideal antidepressant, since it's hard to run and feel sorry for yourself at the same time. Also, there are those hours of clearheadedness that follow a long run."  -Monte Davis

                             

                            Seriously, what message do you think that conveys to the person interviewing you?  That you are completely innocent and have been wronged by the system?  The reality is that, for most interviewers, it will convey that you do not respond well at all to criticism, where you will try to build a case as to why you are right and someone else is wrong.  I have interviewed a lot of people and negativity is definitely one of the red flags that I watch for.

                             

                            Next time, try this:

                             

                            Interviewer:  "I see that you put down that you have a misdemeanor trespassing charge against you.  Can you tell me what that was about?"

                             

                            Red Bird:  "I jogging near railroad tracks and didn't realize I was intruding on the right-of-way. METRA had been having problems with people on the tracks in that area and so they were ticketing everyone that encroached into the right-of-way.  I didn't think I was doing anything wrong but I know better now."

                             

                            Keep it simple, plausible, and neutral.  It doesn't have to match how you really feel about it, you just have to represent it for what it really is: a factor that will have no effect on your job performance if you are hired.

                            Perhaps you should watch this report then if you really believe that nonsense http://www.myfoxchicago.com/story/22188823/too-close-to-tracks-jogger-cited-for-running-near-railroad

                               

                              Actually, if my dog died I would most certainly share it here, and probably start a thread about it.

                               

                               

                               

                              Sad  Our collie, almost 12, passed away a week ago today.  We brought him home when my 15-year-old daughter was only three.  We are all heartbroken.  We got an Australian shepherd puppy last year, but we miss Ranger.

                                 

                                Sad  Our collie, almost 12, passed away a week ago today.  We brought him home when my 15-year-old daughter was only three.  We are all heartbroken.  We got an Australian shepherd puppy last year, but we miss Ranger.

                                 

                                I miss my criminal free record a lot more than any of my former dogs. Cry