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Advice on an Injury (Read 675 times)

andyt


    Hi,

     

    A couple of week ago I went out for two quick 8km runs (quick for me anyway, 25 secs per km quicker than my usual pace) - this was after a period of 14 days of rest due to a tight calf. After the 1st run (Monday) I had a small amount of pain in my right hip, round about the crest of the hip bone but this faded so on Wednesday I went out again and after the run the pain returned and has been there since. It's not as sore as the few days after the run and walking is no problem, in fact it's worse first thing in the morning or after a long period of sitting.

     

    I used Ibuprofen and ice for a few days after the injury and have been to a doctor but didn't get very far with finding out the cause... every other injury has been one google away from the answer. The only thing that's changed recently is my running shoes, Brooks Trance 10's, but I'm up to 100k on them so had done quite a few runs before this injury occured.

     

    Wondering if anyone can offer any advice, cause, or prevention tips for my current situation... The docs advice of doing another form of exercise to keep fit didn'y go down too well - I run to clear my head, de-stress and fell good after a bad day at the office.

     

    Thanks in advance!


    Tomorrow will be worse

      As always, I'll preface this with the fact that I only slightly know what I'm doing, and there is far better expertise on here than mine.

       

      That said, my advise would be to run slower. For me (and I would guess for everyone) a short hard run is more stress on the body than a long(er) easy run (depending on how long), so any time I have a niggly injury that's not bad enough to stop, or after healing from an injury, just cut out anything faster than easy for the first week back. It lets you get back on the road without over-stressing the body during the re-adjustment period.

       

      But that's just what I do, and only because it feels like it works. I have no idea if it's what you "should" do

      Scout7


      CPT Curmudgeon

        You were off for 14 days due to a previous issue.

        You then ran 8km at 25 secs per km faster than you were doing.

        You then ran another 8km at 25 secs/km faster than you were doing.

         

        I'm betting that it's a matter of too much, too soon.  If you are coming back from a previous issue, prevailing wisdom is to go at a slower pace/easier effort than you were before getting sidelined.

         

        It is also possible that your gait is affected by the original issue, which may not be 100% yet (or the running significantly faster than previously created an imbalance).

         

        Either way, I'd say go easier on runs, and that should clear things up.

        andyt


          I think the excitement of runing at such a faster pace (even though my brain told me it was risky) kind of spurred me on a bit - I can be my own worst enemy sometimes when it comes to sense over speed/distance, it's not the first time I've pushed too far, too fast.

           

          Hopefully next week I can start again with a few light 5k's to easy back in, aslo going to visit the local running shop this weekend to confirm that the trainers are correct for my running style.

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            DanMoriarity


              I'd definitely recommend slowing down your runs quite a bit until you've fully recovered. It's important to ease back into your training after any injury. As difficult as it is to be patient, don't try to increase your pace or distance until the pain is completely gone.

               

              I've had hip problems in the past and one thing that really helped was paying attention to my core fitness. Crunches, back extensions and the plank exercise all seemed to help. Building your core strength helps stabilize your torso and takes some of the pressure off your hips.

                You were off for 14 days due to a previous issue.

                You then ran 8km at 25 secs per km faster than you were doing.

                You then ran another 8km at 25 secs/km faster than you were doing.

                 

                I'm betting that it's a matter of too much, too soon.  If you are coming back from a previous issue, prevailing wisdom is to go at a slower pace/easier effort than you were before getting sidelined.

                 

                It is also possible that your gait is affected by the original issue, which may not be 100% yet (or the running significantly faster than previously created an imbalance).

                 

                Either way, I'd say go easier on runs, and that should clear things up.

                 

                +1.

                Andy, you are way overanalyzing and maybe even overreacting to your issue. You took time off and you created too much stress when you came back. Get yourself nice and loose, warmed up perhaps whirlpool, 1 mile walk before running your next several times. Don't worry at all about pace over next few weeks. You took 2 weeks off. You need a month to get that back anyway. Run comfortable for a while and I think it will resolve.

                Those who try, fail! Those who do what it takes to succeed, succeed!!

                jimmyb


                  Hi,

                   

                  A couple of week ago I went out for two quick 8km runs (quick for me anyway, 25 secs per km quicker than my usual pace) - this was after a period of 14 days of rest due to a tight calf. After the 1st run (Monday) I had a small amount of pain in my right hip, round about the crest of the hip bone but this faded so on Wednesday I went out again and after the run the pain returned and has been there since. It's not as sore as the few days after the run and walking is no problem, in fact it's worse first thing in the morning or after a long period of sitting.

                   

                  I used Ibuprofen and ice for a few days after the injury and have been to a doctor but didn't get very far with finding out the cause... every other injury has been one google away from the answer. The only thing that's changed recently is my running shoes, Brooks Trance 10's, but I'm up to 100k on them so had done quite a few runs before this injury occured.

                   

                  Wondering if anyone can offer any advice, cause, or prevention tips for my current situation... The docs advice of doing another form of exercise to keep fit didn'y go down too well - I run to clear my head, de-stress and fell good after a bad day at the office.

                   

                  Thanks in advance!

                   

                  Would need to see your running log, but one of the possibilities is that you are beginning to overtrain. How's your resting heart rate? Has it been higher than normal? Lower than normal?

                   

                  You might be working too much in your anaerobic ranges, and need back off. Especially after coming back after 14 days rest for the other injury, you should stay easy and aerobic for awhile. Rest more, then come back easy. If you don't know how to do that, get a heart rate monitor. It's a great tool that will help you stay easy and aerobic.

                   

                  If you don't monitor your resting heart rate, think about doing so. OT shows up there, and shows up earlier in your aerobic paces. MAF tests are good for this as well.

                   

                  Usually if you are running beat up like this, you are overdoing it. Though sometimes overtraining isn't that you were running more than you normally could handle, but that the mental stress in your life increased. Increased mental stress adds to your training load., and is what pushes many into OT and injury. 100k in relaxed, carefree times is not the same 100k when you are all stressed out. It could be too much.

                   

                  A few links on overtraining:

                   

                  3 stages of OT

                  WHat you don't know about OT

                   

                  --Jimmy Cool

                  Log

                  andyt


                    Thanks for all the posts (except the SPAM one!) - I think you are correct, I overdid it and pushed too hard, too fast after being out for a while. Once the pain has gone I'm getting my gait anaylsed at the local running shop to make sure my running style is biomechanically sound in my trainers and then it's a gentle build up towards the 10k on 20th May - which I'll be aiming to finish comfortably rather than aiming for a PB.

                     

                    cheers!