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cold weather clothes (Read 1680 times)


thumbs up!

    I'm a new runner, so this will be my first experience with running outside in Winter. I've been enjoying the fall crisp runs, and don't want to be stuck on the treadmill all season. Any recommendations/suggestions on cold weather running gear? I'm in Wisconsin. Any day now it's going to get VERY cold.
    2010 Goals
    1. get to and maintain 20 MPW
    2. sub 50 min Crazy Legs 8k -- April 10 (so close! 50:13... next year)
    3. sub 30 min 5k
    4. improved time in Madison half marathon -- May 10


    Marquess of Utopia

      Dress in layers! Big grin I don't let the weather keep me from running! I am always tweeking my clothes, today I purchased a lightweight Balaclava. http://www.mountainhardware.com/Product.aspx?top=6&prod=90&cat=61&viewAll=False I went to 4 stores to find the most comfortable Balaclava. Cool I which they sold them in red or orange. Cry I look like a bank robber in black Tongue This is a good document on layers: http://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=piVPXnhBY7kvPDU9bW8ggLQ&hl=en


      Needs more cowbell!

        I'm in Wisconsin. Any day now it's going to get VERY cold.
        *waves from the other side of Lake MI* Howdy, neighbor...I was born and raised a Cheesehead, so I know you ain't kiddin'! Last year was my first Winter of running. While I will openly admit that most days I really had to psyche myself to get out there, ONCE I was out a half mile or so I really enjoyed it (as long as it wasn't hella windy). Layers are key...I wore something to this effect: Top: wicking baselayer - fleece on top of that - windbreaker if it was really cold and/or blustery Bottom: boot-cut pants...sort of midweight - wicking long undies underneath if it were especially cold Hands: fleece gloves or other midweight breathable knit/stretch material Head: wicking hat that covers the ears well, usually some sort of fleece Socks: midweight Smartwools This year I am planning to invest in a pair of NB shoes (921) that have removable ice spikes and cushioning that stays soft and flexible in the cold, too. I also want to get a couple of neck gaiters, balaclavas, etc. I purchased a new pair of sunglasses recently, too--photochromic Tifosis for $23...these will protect my eyes from wind and blowing snow and adjust to a variety of lighting conditions. I have worn them in sun and under heavy clouds and they really work well. k

        I shoot pretty things! ~

        '14 Goals:

        • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

        • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)


        I've got a fever...

          I have no specific recomendations for clothing since it's been many years since I've had to run in real midwestern cold. But a good rule of thumb is the "+20" rule. Dress for your run such that you'll be comfortable in weather that is 20°F warmer if you weren't running. e.g. On a 20° day, dress like you would if you were just hangin' out in 40° weather. The reason is that if you're bundled up to complete and blissful toastiness when you walk out the door, you will be way too warm once you get running.

          On your deathbed, you won't wish that you'd spent more time at the office.  But you will wish that you'd spent more time running.  Because if you had, you wouldn't be on your deathbed.


          thumbs up!

            Thanks for the good advice. I didn't know what a balaclava was before yesterday. I'll be all incognito (but warm!) It's 28 degrees this morning. I better start shopping!
            2010 Goals
            1. get to and maintain 20 MPW
            2. sub 50 min Crazy Legs 8k -- April 10 (so close! 50:13... next year)
            3. sub 30 min 5k
            4. improved time in Madison half marathon -- May 10


            A Dance with Monkeys

              It is up to you and what you are comfy wearing. My Zones in Tennessee: Down to 40 - short sleeve, shorts Down to 30 - long sleeve, shorts, occasionally gloves Down to 20 - long sleeve, shorts, gloves, occasionally hat Below 20 - long sleeve, tights, gloves, hat, occasionally second top layer But it also varies with how I am feeling, the wind and the humidity. I have run races ~10-15 degrees after sunrise in shorts, long sleeves and gloves and have worn tights when jogging ~30, especially when the sun is not out. All clothes are made of moisture wicking technical fabrics. Once you get moving you will warm up. MTA: in Wisconsin cold, you will acclimate, so your zones will be set to lower temps. But at some point you will need to add a jacket. Women, I think, tend to need to dress a bit warmer; I am not sure why.
                Women, I think, tend to need to dress a bit warmer; I am not sure why.
                Body composition? FWIW, I tend to dress a bit warmer than Trent, despite living in a slightly colder climate--at least for everyday easy runs. Trent's guidelines are basically what I would do for hard runs or workouts--except maybe I wear tights/pants for anything under 30 because my joints feel better if my legs are warm. Windchill tends to be more important than actual temperature. And it's ALWAYS windy in Boston in the winter. I guess my thresholds would be something like this... >50: shorts, short sleeves 50-40: shorts, short or long sleves, gloves 40-30: shorts or tights, long sleeves, vest, gloves 30-20: tights or pants, long sleeves and vest, gloves, possibly a thin hat to start off if its windy 20-10: pants, two shirts and vest or one shirt and jacket, gloves and thin hat 10-0: pants (possibly with tights under), two shirts, jacket, gloves, thin hat <0: pants over tights, jacket over turtleneck over t-shirt, thick ski hat, gloves for gloves i generally only wear $2 cotton gardening gloves but if it's sub zero i might but a pair of smartwool glove liners on under those. your hands will stay warm if your core is warm and you pretty much just need them for wind/surface protection. same with your feet--i wear the same socks in the winter as summer; wrightsocks ultra thin. the only way your feet will be warm is if your core is warm--it doesnt much matter what you wear on your feet. pants="" over="" tights,="" jacket="" over="" turtleneck="" over="" t-shirt,="" thick="" ski="" hat,="" gloves="" for="" gloves="" i="" generally="" only="" wear="" $2="" cotton="" gardening="" gloves="" but="" if="" it's="" sub="" zero="" i="" might="" but="" a="" pair="" of="" smartwool="" glove="" liners="" on="" under="" those.="" your="" hands="" will="" stay="" warm="" if="" your="" core="" is="" warm="" and="" you="" pretty="" much="" just="" need="" them="" for="" wind/surface="" protection.="" same="" with="" your="" feet--i="" wear="" the="" same="" socks="" in="" the="" winter="" as="" summer;="" wrightsocks="" ultra="" thin.="" the="" only="" way="" your="" feet="" will="" be="" warm="" is="" if="" your="" core="" is="" warm--it="" doesnt="" much="" matter="" what="" you="" wear="" on="" your=""></0: pants over tights, jacket over turtleneck over t-shirt, thick ski hat, gloves for gloves i generally only wear $2 cotton gardening gloves but if it's sub zero i might but a pair of smartwool glove liners on under those. your hands will stay warm if your core is warm and you pretty much just need them for wind/surface protection. same with your feet--i wear the same socks in the winter as summer; wrightsocks ultra thin. the only way your feet will be warm is if your core is warm--it doesnt much matter what you wear on your feet.>

                Runners run.

                  I'm with mike, though I may or may not throw on a lightweight hat depending on how windy it is .Even if it's 40-50 degrees.

                  Your toughness is made up of equal parts persistence and experience. You don't so much outrun your opponents as outlast and outsmart them, and the toughest opponent of all is the one inside your head." - Joe Henderson


                  I've got a fever...

                    I think that ear and hand protection are quite important as far as comfort on the run goes. You'd be surprised how cold you can tolerate in shorts and a t-shirt as long as you have gloves and a headband/hat. Also, especially as it gets windy, you may need nipple protection. Maybe even more so for guys. No, I'm not kidding -- ladies will (unless they're going commando) have a sports bra on, whereas I have found that on a windy day, the breeze can cut right though my technical shirt and leave my nipples hurting. Blush

                    On your deathbed, you won't wish that you'd spent more time at the office.  But you will wish that you'd spent more time running.  Because if you had, you wouldn't be on your deathbed.


                    A Dance with Monkeys

                      Body composition should cut the other way. Body fat is insulating and, therefore, should be warming. Men, on average, have less body fat than women and should need more clothing rather than less. But it seems to work the other way.


                      Needs more cowbell!

                        Body composition should cut the other way. Body fat is insulating and, therefore, should be warming. Men, on average, have less body fat than women and should need more clothing rather than less. But it seems to work the other way.
                        I know that when I sit in a chair that was previously occupied by did that it always feels REALLY warm to me. Do some people just run "hotter?" Years ago I was like a furnace and never got cold, now the only time I'm not cold is in the Summer. I seem to be a lot more sensitive to both extremes...is it a mom thing? Or maybe a 30-something chick thing. k

                        I shoot pretty things! ~

                        '14 Goals:

                        • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

                        • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)


                        A Dance with Monkeys

                          I know that when I sit in a chair that was previously occupied by did that it always feels REALLY warm to me.
                          Sorry about that. I eat a lot of fiber.
                          va


                            I know that when I sit in a chair that was previously occupied by did that it always feels REALLY warm to me. Do some people just run "hotter?" Years ago I was like a furnace and never got cold, now the only time I'm not cold is in the Summer. I seem to be a lot more sensitive to both extremes...is it a mom thing? Or maybe a 30-something chick thing. k
                            When I was heavier, I was known to my kids as the "Daddy Furnace". If I held their hands, the warmth would transfer from me to them, like a furnace. Now, I am like zz, cold all the time...
                              I can deal with temperatures in the 40s and 30s with fairly light clothes, but it's the wind that's awful. Sometimes the wind breaking over my ears is louder than a lawnmower!!! Gear I've worn in the past when it has gotten colder... -Cotton knit cap -Cotton hoodie jacket -Cotton T-Shirts -Cotton Sweats -Jeans with a replaced crotch -Cotton shorts with replaced crotch -Huge waterproof jacket with nylon head cover My hands have always been cold. I just tell people I have a warm heart. Wink

                              Vim


                              Awesome

                                Body composition should cut the other way. Body fat is insulating and, therefore, should be warming. Men, on average, have less body fat than women and should need more clothing rather than less. But it seems to work the other way.
                                Except that men have a higher muscle mass/fat ratio and can generate more heat that way.
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