1

Shoes for better midfoot striking? (Read 727 times)


Needs more cowbell!

    Last night I had a mostly crummy run, but the stretch where I concentrated on landing softer and more on my midfoot, instead of my heel was the most comfortable, fastest bit of my run. I think in the coming weeks and months I want to "play" a bit more with my form and see if that might have a positive effect on my speed, injuries, and effort. I'm currently rotating between 3 shoe models--NB 767, 1222, and Asics Kayano 13. All of these shoes have the pretty standard thickly cushioned heel. The things I've been reading suggest that a shoe with a less dramatically chunky heel can really help with midfoot landings, which seems pretty logical. I have seen discussions around the net of runners wearing flats, lighter-weight performance trainers, Newtons, and even running barefoot (not gonna happen here--our roads are in bad shape, often covered with glass or sharp gravel...and then there's always that Winter thing to contend with). Anyhow, the only shoe I have seen that even comes in a wide width is the NB 902, which is actually a shoe I had considered purchasing right before my outer arch tendonitis issues reared-up (which I subsequently healed by wearing a shoe with better arch support and later added arch supporting insoles to my existing shoes) and I was concerned that it wouldn't have the stability or cushioning that I've found the best luck with--but it appears that midfoot striking seems to solve a lot of issues with foot injuries in previous heavy heel strikers, as well as some pronation severity (as a heel striker I have been told by the guy at the running store I bought my last pair of shoes at that my pronation looks pretty moderate). I'd likely still buy something like the NB 1223 for longer runs, at least until I figure out if midfoot striking would even be a form technique that works for me. But I see so many people who have had similar issues to mine (shin splints, overly tight calves, CCS, patella problems) who have found these injuries to be greatly reduced by learning to not heel strike. Thoughs, suggestions, BTDTs? k

    I shoot pretty things! ~

    '14 Goals:

    • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

    • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)


    Needs more cowbell!

      Oops. Tongue

      I shoot pretty things! ~

      '14 Goals:

      • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

      • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

      PWL


      Has been

        Not heel striking can make a lot of difference. By shortening your stride so you hit midfoot you can sometimes actually go faster because you are "braking" less than you do when you heel strike. You will just have quicker foot turnover and a shorter stride. The 902 is going to have slightly less support than the 767--it has a dual density medial posting to help prevent over-pronation, owever, the 902 is lower profile with a thinner sole and will tend to feel like it has less cushion than the 767. Another possible option for you would be the 858--it is due out 9/1, same as the 1223, and is somewhere between the 767 and the 1223 in terms of support. It is cheaper than the 1223 (it's $105 I think). Let me know if you have any other questions or if you need help tracking down a shoe. Big grin

        "I would never die for my beliefs, because I might be wrong."--Bertrand Russell


        Needs more cowbell!

          Peter, I did a 1 hour run today and concentrated on keeping myself leaned forward a bit, including my pelvis. I also paid closer attention to my arms and practiced keeping them moving more front-to-back, instead of swinging around. I cut :30-:45 off of my typical mile time and with no more effort--and no discomfort. It felt a bit awkward, but good at the same time. Rather than plodding along I felt like I was pushing my body...and moving forward, more than up-and-down. I'm astounded by how much difference this made. And my feet definitely planted more flat, rather than back of my heel and rolling so far to my toes. I would have run more than 6 miles (had planned to run 90), but it was getting hot and the humidity was killing my asthma. Not sure if the 858 would work for me. I found the 857 to be much harder and more stable than the 1222. I talked to a woman at a running store recently who said she has always thought the 857 was closer to a motion control shoe than a stability model and I'm inclined to agree based upon my experience. I returned the pair I had, as they often caused my shins fits. I went ahead and ordered a pair of the 902s today. I'm going to see how they work for me. I figure if I'm striking more midfoot I may not need as much pronation control as the 1222/1223 offer, anyhow, which would be nice. I'd really like not having to spend that much on shoes, since I tend to blow through them pretty fast. I'd like to rotate the 902 with the 767 and then this Winter I'm seriously looking at that 921 shoe with the snow spikes. By the time it came out early this year Winter was nearly over. But from the description I think it would work VERY well for my needs and our road conditions. k

          I shoot pretty things! ~

          '14 Goals:

          • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

          • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

          PWL


          Has been

            The winter shoe is nice. I'm planning on getting the Asics Arctic Winter Runner for my winter shoe (Maine has pretty nasty winters too). Last winter I used an old pair of NB 879's with a bunch of short sheet metal screws that I attached to the outsoles myself. It worked pretty well but I think I am going to do the real thing this time. But it's still summer so no more talking about winter....

            "I would never die for my beliefs, because I might be wrong."--Bertrand Russell


            Needs more cowbell!

              The winter shoe is nice. I'm planning on getting the Asics Arctic Winter Runner for my winter shoe (Maine has pretty nasty winters too). Last winter I used an old pair of NB 879's with a bunch of short sheet metal screws that I attached to the outsoles myself. It worked pretty well but I think I am going to do the real thing this time. But it's still summer so no more talking about winter....
              Ha, yeah...Winter...bah, humbug! Although I'm already making a mental list of the clothing items I need to replace from last year or buy more of and watching for deals now. I ran in the 767 all-weather model all last Winter...kept my feet toasty, but the cushioning went hard as a rock and the traction was terrible. Glad to hear that the 921 is a good shoe. Makes more sense than trying attachments, screws, or limiting miles too much. k

              I shoot pretty things! ~

              '14 Goals:

              • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

              • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)