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Rant about Asthma (Read 288 times)

    I was diagnosed in April with exercise induced/ allergic induced asthma while training for my 2nd marathon, and it kind of came out of nowhere. My whole family has asthma, but I always thought I was the "lucky" one because I never had any issues.  I've learned to control it by controlling my allergies and taking Singulair. I've run 3 marathons this year, with little to no issues during the races. 

     

    I just ran about 7 miles in 60 degrees and 100% humidity and wanted to DIE. Humidity is one of the worst triggers for me, so it was brutal. Luckily I had my inhaler and water because I knew it would be bad today. But man, I can't wait until it gets cold around here! I know cold triggers some people's asthma but I tend to be fine in the cold. 

     

    Anyway, rant over... Anyone else care to add? 


    Needs more cowbell!

      Humidity = Hell for me, as well.  Only cold <10 or so seems to bother me.

      I shoot pretty things! ~

      '14 Goals:

      • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

      • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

        youngest daughter had this when she was playing soccer when she was younger & it really just came out of nowhere as well.  she learned how to control it while playing soccer/basketball as you have with your running.  I've developed a neural muscular disease that greatly affects my breathing while running.  everyday is different & still trying to learn how to adjust.   as you know it is extremely frustrating at times.  probably never have complete control over it but at least can manage it to certain degree.  caffeine & any kind of stress can  trigger it. daily learning experience.   sounds like you are still on the learning curve as I am & you are getting a better "handle" on it.   youre doing well & figuring it all out.

          Inflammation does it to me. Foods and allergens definitely trigger an inflammatory response, as does hard exercise.  If I don't take the time to warm up and start slow, then everything feels tight, irritated, and I cough a lot, eventually mucusy gunk.  Between that and tight muscles in general, my warm-up is now a brisk 15 minute walk, followed by 10 minutes of stretching, followed by an easy mile (right now they are all easy).  I try to keep my respiration rate low for the first 10 minutes of running, about 24/minute, and try to keep it below 30/minute for most runs.  When I am in shape, I can do intervals and tempo runs, but I need as least 3 miles of easy warmup running first.  Living at 7000' makes it a real challenge as well.  I have an inhaler but use it very sparingly.  It might help to modify your racing goals to longer distance, where V02 max is less of a factor.  I've never racced a 10K but have done several ultramarathons including breaking 24 hours in a 100 miler.  It's not the end of the world.

          2013 H1:  7 hours/week base.  Q3: Train for goal race.  Q4:  Goal Race.

            Inflammation does it to me. Foods and allergens definitely trigger an inflammatory response, as does hard exercise.  If I don't take the time to warm up and start slow, then everything feels tight, irritated, and I cough a lot, eventually mucusy gunk.  Between that and tight muscles in general, my warm-up is now a brisk 15 minute walk, followed by 10 minutes of stretching, followed by an easy mile (right now they are all easy).  I try to keep my respiration rate low for the first 10 minutes of running, about 24/minute, and try to keep it below 30/minute for most runs.  When I am in shape, I can do intervals and tempo runs, but I need as least 3 miles of easy warmup running first.  Living at 7000' makes it a real challenge as well.  I have an inhaler but use it very sparingly.  It might help to modify your racing goals to longer distance, where V02 max is less of a factor.  I've never racced a 10K but have done several ultramarathons including breaking 24 hours in a 100 miler.  It's not the end of the world.

             

            It's interesting you bring that up, because most of my 2013 goal races are ultras. I also find that when I am moving slower, the asthma doesn't seem to flare (makes sense.) Perhaps that is why I am not so interested in setting a new marathon PR next year, and instead going past 26.2. I really enjoy hills, even when I can't breathe, but speedwork is not my friend. 

             

            Additionally, I'm considering a move out to Denver next summer which will certainly shake things up a bit. But I figure I'll cross that bridge if/when it comes. 

              I believe there is a strategy called the "rebound effect'.  It has been awhile so I may not have all the facts...but essentially you go out and trigger an attack and then wait for awhile - you should be able to run after the first attach subsides.