RA Movie Thread (Read 5567 times)

    Double Indemnity (1944)

    The File on Thelma Jordan (1950)

    Detour (1945)

    Fatal Attraction (1987)

    Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988)

     

    Women can get guys into trouble.  At least in these movies.

     

    & another!

    My wife says i have a short attention spanners are great, aren't they?

    zonykel


       

      Added one!

       

      Yeah, Fatal Attraction weirded me out.

      jimmyb


        I just sank deeper into my Atlantahood by watching Tyler Perry's Madea's Witness Protection on Netflix. My first taste of the Madea universe.  Even though the movie is a bit amateur at times, I laughed heartily at Madea and the old man that lives with her (both played by Perry). Perry can be quite funny. The supporting characters weren't funny at all, but when Madea was ranting---good stuff.  Watched a comedy and I laughed. Good enough for me.

        Log    PRs

          Panic in the Streets

           

          This brilliant 1950 film noir, about a public health doctor and a police detective on the chase to catch gangsters who are infected with bubonic plague and running loose in the city of New Orleans, stars a young Jack Palance as the lead villain.  This is a fast-paced and intense flick even by today's standards, and it's also an interesting look at post-WWII city culture.

          zonykel


            The wolf of Wall Street: Lots of sex and drug scenes. I enjoyed it, but it's not for everyone.

            jimmyb


              The wolf of Wall Street: Lots of sex and drug scenes. I enjoyed it, but it's not for everyone.

               

              I thought it was a Disney flick about a lost wolf that finds its way to lower Manhattan and is befriended by a broker and his loving family. Now that I know the movie is about pleasures of the flesh and getting high , there's no way I can go see it now. Thanks for the warning.

              Log    PRs

              mab411


              Proboscis Colossus

                Panic in the Streets

                 

                This brilliant 1950 film noir, about a public health doctor and a police detective on the chase to catch gangsters who are infected with bubonic plague and running loose in the city of New Orleans, stars a young Jack Palance as the lead villain.  This is a fast-paced and intense flick even by today's standards, and it's also an interesting look at post-WWII city culture.

                 

                That's a twist I haven't seen before.

                "God guides us on our journey, but careful with those feet." - David Lee Roth, of all people

                zonykel


                  Not too many F-bombs. That's sure to disappoint some.

                   

                  I thought it was a Disney flick about a lost wolf that finds its way to lower Manhattan and is befriended by a broker and his loving family. Now that I know the movie is about pleasures of the flesh and getting high , there's no way I can go see it now. Thanks for the warning.

                  jimmyb


                    Not too many F-bombs. That's sure to disappoint some.

                     

                    That's okay if there are, I have a mental technique that automatically changes (at the speed of light) that vile word into "fremescent" which causes me to growl and mutter, which clears my mind so that I can resume thinking about the joys of francomania (I used to be Francophobic--I got help) and making man-panties out of froulard (my other favorite F-word).

                    Log    PRs


                    old woman w/hobby

                      It's been mentioned before but speaking of F-bombs, I just finished re-watching In Bruges with my daughter.

                      It's got to be one of my all time favorite movies.

                      steph  

                       

                      OCD  If you don't laugh...   

                      zonykel


                        Does it have more F-bombs than scar face?

                        It's been mentioned before but speaking of F-bombs, I just finished re-watching In Bruges with my daughter.

                        It's got to be one of my all time favorite movies.


                        old woman w/hobby

                          Does it have more F-bombs than scar face?

                          Didn't watch Scar Face, but they do use it quite a lot.  I think that it is a favorite Irish wordSmile

                          steph  

                           

                          OCD  If you don't laugh...   

                            It's been mentioned before but speaking of F-bombs, I just finished re-watching In Bruges with my daughter.

                            It's got to be one of my all time favorite movies.

                             

                            Oh yes, outstanding movie.

                            Dave

                              I took myself to Saving Mr. Banks today and really enjoyed it. It tells the tale of the author of the Mary Poppins books and Walt Disney's struggle to convince her to let him make the movie. It's clearly highly fictionalized, but hey, it's Disney. (But not really for kids Disney, FYI.)

                                The Wolf of Wall Street

                                 

                                I'm not sure if this makes any sense, but Martin Scorsese is one of those directors whose films I tend to respect more than I actually enjoy watching. I am always fascinated when I read or listen to his commentaries about cinema or film restoration, but I find his own movies to be a mixed bag. I am happy to say that Scorsese's latest film, The Wolf of Wall Street, is one of the few that hits all of the right notes, and that it is my favorite movie of his since Goodfellas. This film clocks in at 179 minutes, but that time flies thanks to superb pacing and to what is quite possibly Leonardo DiCaprio's best role. 

                                Leonardo DiCaprio plays Jordan Belfort, who founded the Stratton Oakmont brokerage firm and enjoyed years of hard-partying excess until he was convicted in the late 1990s for laundering and securities fraud. If you are easily offended by debauchery in movies, then you may want to steer clear of The Wolf of Wall Street, because this movie pulls no punches as DiCaprio plans his schemes with utmost dismissiveness, along with co-stars Jonah Hill, Margot Robbie, Matthew McConaughey, and a great many others. Like Goodfellas, this movie excels in depicting characters who rise quickly to the top through illegals means, but who lack the imagination to do anything with their money other than become immersed in gaudy lifestyle trappings, like drugs and flashy homes or cars. There's no doubt that the walls are going to close in on these people at some point, and the fun of this film lies in observing how Scorsese somehow creates tension out of showing unsympathetic characters sinking deeper into their dilemmas. The cinematography here is engaging and trippy, as DiCaprio speaks straight into the camera and demands our attention. One might criticize this movie by saying that it never shows any of the real victims of Belfort's penny stock scams and that it never shows how these unfortunate people had their lives wrecked while he profited from the scams, but the characters in this movie never actually saw their victims either, and that detachment brings a strange authenticity to the final result. 

                                If you are familiar with Scorsese's unique and often-controversial styles of storytelling, then I enthusiastically recommend The Wolf of Wall Street. I am somewhat under the weather today and being awakened by this lively film was just what the doctor ordered.