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mediocrity (Read 1056 times)

Cathoholic


    Why is running the only sport where mediocrity is not only accepted but praised? It reminds me of the courtesy clap that is given to all of the runners who just finish the race. This may be the reason that Americans cannot compete on the world stage. If we as a running society ask nothing of a person we will receive nothing. We should be praising the people who compete, not just show up. We should lose our insouciante attitude.
    fatcracker


      Why is running the only sport where mediocrity is not only accepted but praised? It reminds me of the courtesy clap that is given to all of the runners who just finish the race. This may be the reason that Americans cannot compete on the world stage. If we as a running society ask nothing of a person we will receive nothing. We should be praising the people who compete, not just show up. We should lose our insouciante attitude.
      It is about being out there and finishing what you begin. We could be on the sofa with beer and chips, but we try hard to. Even though the sport may be watered down, it is about personal accomplishments.


      Needs more cowbell!

        Speaking for myself, I have 2 choices--be a mediocre runner or not run at all. I'm not, nor will I ever be, an elite--elites aren't built like me. There's no denying genetics. That's OK with me. Running keeps me from being overweight, which is what 90% of the women in my family are...short, dumpy, completely unathletic. I'm a svelte goddess by comparison. But I'll bet you also criticize anyone carrying around a few extra pounds, too. Guess what...a lot of us mediocre runners got into the sport as a means to stay trim(mer) and healthy. Running races (even at the back of the pack) is one way to stay committed to lacing up and consistently running. We aren't all blessed with slight frames, fast metabolisms, and runner's builds. Some of us have asthma added to the mix. And some of us spend 2x as much time to run the same distance every week in addition to family schedules to work around. I think that takes more determination and committment than the person who has all the advantages in his/her favor.

        I shoot pretty things! ~

        '14 Goals:

        • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

        • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

          Ok, I'll bite. In point of fact, it is not the only sport where "mediocrity", as you have chosen to employ it, is both accepted and praised. Golf and bowling both come immediately to mind--and in both of those arenas, we "handicap" participants so they can compete on a more level playing field. And I have yet to golf in a four-some where praise was not meted out to the high-handicap, weekend golfer for just doing their best--regardless of the final score. Which is too bad, really. If only we would celebrate the most competitive, America might have the number one golfer in the world one day. Nor do I subscribe to the tired maxim that "Americans cannot compete on the world stage". In the distance events, I would submit that the last Summer Olympics and the most recent Boston marathon would provide evidence to the contrary. Other than the Kenyans and Ethiopians (and we can have a rather robust discussion about why that is, and how other nations fare no better against them), we compete quite well, thank you. When you consider that, in the U.S. last year, less than 1% of the population completed a marathon, I would venture that those who did so were not among the "mediocre" at all. Why do I applaud the back-of-pack runner? Because I know somewhat of what it took for that person to achieve their personal best. I expect the elites to do well--for most, that is their living. But everyone, at every level, has a story. And what it takes for a 5-hour marathoner to finish is just as compelling as for anyone else. To applaud their accomplishment is to both recognize a very significant effort, and may spur them on to trying again--and perhaps doing better. At least they were willing to enter the arena, and put in the time and distance to achieve what may be for many a once-in-a-lifetime goal. Yes, I will always applaud the effort. No matter the distance that one chooses to run. What you choose to call an insouciant attitude I choose to call respect. And by the way--we do praise the people who compete. Well, I've really gone off on a tangent, I suppose. Wish I had more time, but I gotta get my mind on my marathon this Saturday. Of course, I know you just posted to get some discussion going. Well done.
          My Masters (>50) Race PR's: 5K - 20:17 10K - 42:36 HM - 1:31:22 Marathon - 3:20:48
            Crikey dude/dudette, mellow out already? Do you need a little run today?
              Why is running the only sport where mediocrity is not only accepted but praised? It reminds me of the courtesy clap that is given to all of the runners who just finish the race. This may be the reason that Americans cannot compete on the world stage. If we as a running society ask nothing of a person we will receive nothing. We should be praising the people who compete, not just show up. We should lose our insouciante attitude.
              Right-o, Sparky. Some people are just plain old icons of mediocrity on the road and track, yet somehow manage to be awe-inspiring, beautiful human beings. While others run like the wind and yet embody mediocrity in all their human qualities. Which one do you think I admire more? And which one do you think you are? And, of course, then you get pretentious putzes who are intellectually insecure enough to toss a word like "insouciante" (sic) into their speech ... and yet with delicious irony, manage to misspell it. The English word you were reaching for is "insouciant," Chief. I'd love to chat more, but frankly I disapprove of grammatical and linguistic mediocrity. People who can't excel at using the written word shouldn't bother, right, Skippy? Ah, crap. Did I feed a troll? Just for fun ... somebody check Einstein here's IP address against Ibelfords. I'll give anyone 10-1 odds that they're awfully similar. Shutting my mouth now ... Tight lipped
              E-mail: JakeKnight2002@aol.com
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                Which is too bad, really. If only we would celebrate the most competitive, America might have the number one golfer in the world one day.
                For the record, *THAT* is one of driest and funniest pieces of snarkism I've ever seen. In fact, it was so dry I suspect it went right over it's intended target's head. I literally laughed out loud when I read that. Too frickin' funny. Oh - and YOU spelled "insouciant" right, too. That made me smile. (insert polite golf clap here)
                E-mail: JakeKnight2002@aol.com
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                Cathoholic


                  Ok, I'll bite. In point of fact, it is not the only sport where "mediocrity", as you have chosen to employ it, is both accepted and praised. Golf and bowling both come immediately to mind--and in both of those arenas, we "handicap" participants so they can compete on a more level playing field.
                  Do we want running to be compared with an irresponsible, environmentally damaging "sport" such as golf, or a "sport" for beer drinking slobs such as bowling?
                    So because I will never win a race I shouldn't compete? My EX-husband had the same idea. Note that it's now EX...

                    Roads were made for journeys...

                      LOL! You faster runners should be *grateful* that we slower runners are out there on the course! We make you look so good!!! Big grin

                      Roads were made for journeys...

                        Do we want running to be compared with an irresponsible, environmentally damaging "sport" such as golf, or a "sport" for beer drinking slobs such as bowling?
                        As long as I'm not compared with JakeNight's avatar, I don't care. However--when you can combine running and golf into one event (as they do in Speedgolf), then you've probably hit on the perfect sport.
                        My Masters (>50) Race PR's: 5K - 20:17 10K - 42:36 HM - 1:31:22 Marathon - 3:20:48
                          As long as I'm not compared with JakeNight's avatar, I don't care.
                          Don - looking at your picture, you and he ought to get together and do a little hair re-distribution... Wink

                          Roads were made for journeys...

                            Do we want running to be compared with an irresponsible, environmentally damaging "sport" such as golf, or a "sport" for beer drinking slobs such as bowling?
                            He says that like being called a "beer drinking slob" is a bad thing. Embarrassed Strange.
                            As long as I'm not compared with JakeNight's avatar, I don't care.
                            Imagine how bad you'd feel if that was a recent portrait. And how do you know it's not? /topic-off By the way ... (speaking of Mr. T) ... did anyone else catch Mr. T on CNN tonight? He's still so damn cool.
                            E-mail: JakeKnight2002@aol.com
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                            Needs more cowbell!

                              I shoot pretty things! ~

                              '14 Goals:

                              • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

                              • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

                              fatcracker


                                I have heard that golfers are now taking performance enhancing drugs.
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