12

Ready to give up I need help (Read 442 times)

sclark5427


    Seriously pissed off I have been running for 2 years now and I still can't run 1.5 miles without stopping. Seriously I ran a mile in 8 minutes when I was in 4th grade but now it takes 15 minutes to do 1.5 miles. Its really making me mad I love to run but I feel constant pain when I do so. Mostly in my shins, ankles, and in various places on my feet. I have gone to a running store got my gait analyzed all that still hasn't helped with the pain. I have tried so many different shoes Nike Pegasus, I have tried barefoot running and various insoles but nothing seems to dull the pain. I am not fat at all infact I am pretty skinny. Not trying to sound like a whiny brat or anything but I am tired of being in pain and my running not improving. I do a forefoot strike and run pretty slow. I have looked up all kinds of videos and form tutorials and I don't seem to see any bad form. Apparently I have high arches but when I use high arch insoles it feels like its digging into my feet and I have to stop. My right foot always gets numb as well about 2 miles into my 3 mile runs.

     

    Please help me I don't know what I should do. I'm going to go back to the running store when my shin splints are healed and see if new shoes will help me or insoles or something.

     

    Sorry for this unstructured rant but I just got back for a run and I am really pissed off right now.

     

    Thanks in advance for any help.


    Latent Runner

      A couple of comments:

      1. I too have a high arch; as a general statement, I wear neutral shoes which typically rules out many of the most popular shoes on the market.  While Asics hasn't exactly cornered the market in shoes which work well for me, I'm guessing four out of every five pairs of shoes I buy are from Asics.
      2. I've also suffered from shin splints in the past.  How did I get rid of them?  I quit running for a few months; nothing else worked.  Once I stared running again I did so exclusively on dirt trails, and since that time I've yet to feel even the slightest twinge of a shin splint; I continue running on dirt because I want to keep it that way.

      Fat old man PRs:

      • 1-mile (point to point, gravity assist): 5:50
      • 2-mile: 13:49
      • 5K (gravity assist last mile): 21:31
      • 5-Mile: 37:24
      • 10K (first 10K of my Half Marathon): 48:16
      • 10-Mile (first 10 miles of my Half Marathon): 1:17:40
      • Half Marathon: 1:42:13
      carlos49er


        Considering all you have done, I would stop running for while and see a sports Dr. Maybe you have some stress fractures in your legs and can take up to 3 months to heal. Maybe there's a calcium or vitamin deficiency there. I hate to play the what if game so definitely visit a bone and muscle specialist to rule out any major issues.

        ShuffleFaster


          Sorry to hear this.

           

          My suggestion:  I think a trip to a sports podiatrist would probably be a very helpful thing for you.

          NHLA


            I would find a good personal trainer.  Something is not right and they might be able to fix it.

              Just a thought. I've got high arches and tend to forefoot-stike (hard to do otherwise on steep hills). I've had problems with forefoot pain. My PT suggested I not forefoot strike and showed me the biomechanics of what's happening using a rubber model of the foot. Hard to explain, but it's a very high angle foot strike with high arches. I wasn't willing to change because of the hazards on trails, but he set me up with metatarsal pads, which helped somewhat. Do you have callus buildup on bottom of your forefoot?

               

              YOu may have a completely different problem, but thought I'd throw that into the mix.

              "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog
              cookiemonster


              Connoisseur of Cookies

                What you are describing warrants a trip to see a doc preferably a sports medicine doc.  You shouldn't be going numb.  You shouldn't be in so much pain.  You need further evaluation to determine if this is simply a biomechanical issue or if there are physiologic causes at play.

                 

                In addition to seeking medical advice for your ongoing pain issues please consider stopping your review of "how to run" type videos.  There is no one running form that works for everyone.  Forefoot strike, barefoot, heel strike and more vary from person to person.  Just because a video demonstrates one way doesn't mean that that's the best way for you.  Run however is comfortable for you.  If that means running barefoot then fine.  If it means running in a shoe and heel striking that's ok, too.

                ***************************************************************************************

                 

                "C" is for cookie.  That's good enough for me.

                diane_77


                  Considering all you have done, I would stop running for while and see a sports Dr. Maybe you have some stress fractures in your legs and can take up to 3 months to heal. Maybe there's a calcium or vitamin deficiency there. I hate to play the what if game so definitely visit a bone and muscle specialist to rule out any major issues.

                   

                  I too say see a doctor.  Maybe see your primary and tell them where and how bad you are hurting.  They may be able to help, or they can refer you to an orthopaedic or podiatry doctor.  Either way, see a doc.  Pain not listened to can lead to injury, and keeping you from running at all.

                  Coastal


                    Time to see a doc.  Maybe start with a podiatrist who works with runners.  Call and ask the office if you have to.  You could have other issues going on, too.  The only way to know is see a good doc.


                    Gang Name "Pound Cake"

                      Likely that I'll get dumped on for this, but... Maybe running isn't the best sport for you. 2 years of effort but no fitness or bodily adaption? Maybe swimming or biking would be better for you. No sense in injuring yourself with no health improvement if your body isn't biomechanically accepting of running. I do believe most people can run if they take it up slowly enough and pay attention to form, body weight issues, foot/shoe issues. But 2 years? Something isn't right with this picture. I agree that seeking out a doctor who specializes in runners issues should be your next step. But I also think you should consider low impact ways to be active.

                       

                      Feel free to ignore this post as I'm a new runner and only have lots of running book knowledge.

                      - Scott

                      2014 Goals: First Marathon - BQ2016 <3:40 (3:25:18) - 1/2M <1:45 - 5K <22:00

                      2014 Marathons: 05/04 Flying Pig (3:49:02) - 09/20 Air Force (BQ 3:25:18) - 11/01 Indianapolis Monumental

                        How many times per week do you run?  How far?  How fast?  A running log on this site will help us help you.  How old are you?

                         

                        We all improve at our own rate.  It took me a full year of running before I could maintain 20 miles per week, and two years before I could maintain 30 MPW.  I was stuck at 30 MPW for two years before I could consistently run more miles.

                         

                        Sometimes, it's a good idea to take a few weeks off running.  I've done that about three times now, and substituted walking and bicycling during those times.


                        Queen of 3rd Place

                          You should get cleared by your physician but in any case it sounds like you need to SLOW DOWN.

                           

                          When I took up running in middle age (44, I think) I was advised to run at the same pace you're reporting, about 10 min/mi. Sounded slow, seemed conservative.

                           

                          Many injuries, heartache, miscellaneous aches and pains, and months, later I figured out I needed to start at more like 12 min/mi or slower. It was humbling. I plodded along like this for months and months, day after day. It was boring. Then it was 11 min (oh no! too fast! I'll get hurt again!). I backed off. Then I was noticing I could sometimes go 10:30. I kept plodding along. Nothing bad happened. Years have gone by, and I'm JUST NOW doing my easy miles around that prescribed 10 min/mi pace. When I feel good it's maybe 9:30 - 9:40.

                          Ex runner

                            Just a thought. I've got high arches and tend to forefoot-stike (hard to do otherwise on steep hills). I've had problems with forefoot pain. My PT suggested I not forefoot strike and showed me the biomechanics of what's happening using a rubber model of the foot. Hard to explain, but it's a very high angle foot strike with high arches. I wasn't willing to change because of the hazards on trails, but he set me up with metatarsal pads, which helped somewhat. Do you have callus buildup on bottom of your forefoot?

                             

                            YOu may have a completely different problem, but thought I'd throw that into the mix.

                             

                            AKTrail, I don't really have forefoot pain, but your post still interests me as I have hi arches and am pretty much a forefoot-striker. And I have callus buildup on my forefoot, but it's mostly located on the side of my big toe and at the base of the big toe (don't know how to call that part of the foot). Darn, I'd love to get these biomechanics explained to me.

                               

                              AKTrail, I don't really have forefoot pain, but your post still interests me as I have hi arches and am pretty much a forefoot-striker. And I have callus buildup on my forefoot, but it's mostly located on the side of my big toe and at the base of the big toe (don't know how to call that part of the foot). Darn, I'd love to get these biomechanics explained to me.

                              This diagram is a little exaggerated, but look at the angle of the bones from the midfoot to the forefoot of the foot labelled "cavus foot" and compare with the normal. You're landing with a much steeper angle.

                              "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog

                                This diagram is a little exaggerated, but look at the angle of the bones from the midfoot to the forefoot of the foot labelled "cavus foot" and compare with the normal. You're landing with a much steeper angle.

                                 

                                Hmm, interesting. Now I just have to decide if I should go see someone and maybe prevent complications, or wait until something happens. I ususally don't fix things that aren't broken but prevention might be smarter in this case.

                                 

                                Thanks.

                                12