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Feeling discouraged yet again (Read 1568 times)

Scout7


CPT Curmudgeon

    Why did you sign up for a half?

     

    I think that your goals are your issue.  They are all in conflict.  You seem to be stressed over your running to an extent that seems above where running actually relates to your other goals.  You have a career and a family, and those are your two most important things right now it seems.  Nothing wrong with that at all.  But if running creates guilt or stress because you believe it takes time away from other priorities, then perhaps you shouldn't be stressing over running by signing up for half marathons.

     

    The above may seem harsh, but it represents my experiences.  I understand wanting to have goals and plans, and tracking improvements in your fitness, but I think you need to realize that there are lots of ways to have realistic, attainable, angst-free goals, and that tracking progress and improvement can be done in a variety of ways.

     

    If it were me, I'd be sitting down and looking at my priorities, figuring out exactly where running falls in the order of my life, and then looking at my schedule to see what makes sense.  If running is not one of my main priorities, I would look for ways to make running less stressful.

     

    You have enough stress, and as you said, running is supposed to be relieving some of it.  It sounds like it's adding.

      Ok so you all are awesome! I knew I would get great advice, as I always do here. I want to clear some things up first though. My resting hr is about 55. Right before I took on training for the half I did in November, I was playing around with the MAF running concept because I was once again discouraged and felt "lost" in the running world. I find that if I don't have something to aim for, like a race, or a training plan, I slack off on my running and struggle to find inspiration to get out there. 3 years ago I got pregnant. Before this time, my running was great ( in my opinion). I could run a 5 miler WITHOUT walking at a slow, but tolerable pace of about 11mm. I was happy running, and never dreamed of doing anything longer than a 10k. I struggle ALOT with the mental aspects of long distance running (like feeling my time might be better spent cleaning my messy house, or spending quality time with my family, or running those errands I never seem to get done). But I also need to run- to relieve some stress, to get a little escape from everyday life. But I'm also someone who like data. I like to see if my pace is improving. I like to watch my HR and correlate it with how I am feeling at the time. I like to plot all this crap over time and see if I can run more each month. So giving up the technical things would be extremely difficult for me. But I agree with the more experienced runners that this is probably exactly what I need. But I've already registered for the half in May. Do I just abandon the training plan now and go all hippie style running for a while. Do I have to go "find myself" in my running now?! Haha! This is the last thing I want to really stress in regards to my abilities......I do not live a lifestyle that enables me to run more than 3 days a week. I strive for at least 4 days a week and it always fails. It's just my life. Please don't take this as being negative (which kinda ticked me off when I was accused of this to be honest), I am simply being honest with myself. I work night shift 10 hr shifts half of my week, and then switch back to a day person for the other half of the week. I do this every week, for the past 6 years. The comstant switching up of my sleeping habits already takes a tough toll on me. I am a full-time career woman, a wife, and a mother to a 2 year old toddler. Any of you who have children should immediately understand this added difficulty to any lifestyle! So when I say that running 3 times a week is hard enough for me to pull off, please know that I am serious! I'm already dreading running anything longer than 7 miles in this training plan because of the sheer time suck it presents to me. Maybe i do have to seriously re-think the way I approach running right now. Working on improving my aerobic capacity is my main goal so if I need to completely start over and throw all my running tricks out the window, maybe it's time to really consider doing that. I just don't know. This is why I always feel conflicted. This is exactly why I got involved with my mini-running group and coach, but it seems to be making running life even more difficult for me. I would love to find a partner who coul hang with my slow pace enough so that I could actually understand what it's like to hold a conversation while running! But I just don't know anybody with similar fairness levels to me right now. Thanks again for all the valuable insight thus far. I really appreciate the fact that you guys take the time to listen, mull it all over in your heads, and then sit down to type me such long and thoughtful replies.

       I understand your problem I have also need goals to be able to motivate my self for training. But with your training capability my advise would be first train for a 10k and improve on a 10k first before going for a HM. And make sure you can finish the 10K in a 11mm per Mile pace with out walking. and when you have done this set new goals that are realistic for the time you can spend running.

       

      Good luck

        Also, you can't "play around with" the Maffetone method and see any benefits from it. I've followed it with much success. My MAF paces went from 13:00+ mpm to under 10:00 mpm in 15 months of strict MAF running with a few races thrown in for fun and some faster running.

         

        The pain that hurts the worse is the imagined pain. One of the most difficult arts of racing is learning to ignore the imagined pain and just live with the present pain (which is always bearable.) - Jeff

         

        2014 Goals:

         

        Stay healthy

        Enjoy life

         


        Tomorrow will be worse

          Also, you can't "play around with" the Maffetone method and see any benefits from it. I've followed it with much success. My MAF paces went from 13:00+ mpm to under 10:00 mpm in 15 months of strict MAF running with a few races thrown in for fun and some faster running.

           

          I'm going to add a question here - partial derail, but it applies.

           

          Is there any benefit to HR training if you can't dedicate enough time/miles? I'm totally sold on the fact that lots of time at low HR actually improves your speed at that low-HR. But that requires time and miles to induce adaptation, I'm not sure 3 times/wk will do it. That said I'm no exercise physiologist, so what do I know?

           

          Back to the OP, I agree with some of the others that you should just try to find 30mins/day to run. Who cares how far or how fast. Practically, I started to be able to fit in more miles when I flipped a switch in my brain that got me out of my vehicle - from "drive to work" to "run to work". It's only a 40min run to/from work, and if I don't feel up to the round trip I can do the one-way thing with public transit to get home.

           

          Look through your daily life for time you're spending travelling/commuting. If you can replace some of that car/bus/train time with running time, it doesn't disrupt your life as much while allowing you to spend the time you need to improve your running. Just a thought - I know it worked for me, but then the distances between places I'm commuting to/from are manageable on foot, which obviously isn't the case for everyone.

          Scout7


          CPT Curmudgeon

            I'm going to add a question here - partial derail, but it applies.

             

            Is there any benefit to HR training if you can't dedicate enough time/miles? I'm totally sold on the fact that lots of time at low HR actually improves your speed at that low-HR. But that requires time and miles to induce adaptation, I'm not sure 3 times/wk will do it. That said I'm no exercise physiologist, so what do I know?

             

            HR-based training is no different than training by pace or RPE or anything else.

             

            Heart rate is a metric that tells you your level of exertion, and is used to monitor and manage overall effort.  Running 3 times a week at a low effort level will have a different effect on different people (or even on the same person at different stages).

             

            Depending on your goals, three times a week may be enough, or nowhere near enough.

              Chrissy, thanks for your detailed clarification.  I like what Scout said about prioritization, and would only add that with all you've got going in your life, I hope you will keep in mind that you deserve your special time, whether you use it for running or whatever.

               

              And, I may be making a self-image adjustment, wondering if I'm one of those hippie runners you alluded to. Smile

              Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

                I am probably the "hippie" runner she was referring to, although I took my point to be more Senecan than Garcian.


                Feeling the growl again

                   

                  I want to improve my LT HR, so my Ironman athlete friend told me I should do more speedwork to push my body to the limits and let it get used to it.  Is this right?  What do I need to do in order to get past this run/walking thing?  Do I need to see a cardiologist, is something wrong with my heart that it shoots up so quickly?  

                   

                   

                  Speedwork will provide limited improvement for a short time.  What you need is a base, which will also improve your LT HR (among other things).

                   

                  One big fault of HR training is that they try to give you formulas etc that they expect you to follow.  Well, even at an easy pace my wife's HR is around 180-200.  This used to concern me, until I realized that this was normal for her and it would do this even while she was at a conversational pace (she has a normal resting HR).   In times when she has run most and she is in better shape, he pace at such a HR has gotten faster but she's never been able to actually run without a HR 160+.

                   

                  In order to get past the run/walk thing, I suggest you just quit walking.  I know that sounds stupid simple, and you don't want to run that slow, but honestly if you have to run slower than you walk to keep running that DO IT.  Over time this will help you improve.  Continuing to put in walking may help you cover the distance....and it's an OK transitory tactic...but it's not doing much to actually get you to a point where you can run continuously.  Even if the distance you cover is shorter, I'd slow down and do the continuous run most days.

                   

                  You are operating under a certain set of constraints that keep you to 3 days/week.  I can understand this as my wife used to have a similar work situation and it had the same impact on her exercise routine.  However, given that 3day/week limitation, you MUST calibrate your goals accordingly.  Why did you sign up for a HM when you are still trying to get to where you can run a distance continuously?  In all honestly, with only 3 runs/week you are not training adequately to be setting HM goals other than to finish.  You would really be better to focus on 5K/10K, and even then you will need to learn to be content with what you can acheive within the boundaries you've set for yourself.

                   

                  There was a time when I was a very competitive runner.  I had to average 70+ mpw (preferably 90+) for months on end to be at the level I was at.  It was VERY hard for me when family/career came along....I was relegated to running 50 mpw....and found myself losing fitness and slowing down even as I continued to train!  For almost a year I even quit running, more or less.  Eventually I learned to (mostly!) calibrate my goals to my new life.  I no longer run PRs, but I enjoy running again, chasing my CURRENT goals, and feel a LOT less guilt....either from not running when I have other priorities, or from sliding on other priorities because I feel I have to run when I really don't have time.

                   

                  Oh and your training....a day of speedwork, long run, tempo, and a recovery day??? Just because you are running less does not mean you just cut out all the easy running and keep the workouts.  IMHO that's a) asking for injury, and b) not optimal.  Easy running gets you certain adaptations, running fast/hard/long virtually every time you step out the door is not going to make up for not doing any easy running.  That sort of strategy may work for someone with a lot of miles run in recent history...like coming back from injury with limited volume....but not for someone in your situation.

                  "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                   

                    That should build her up.

                     

                    (Someone will get that.)

                     

                     

                    "just to let her down"   

                     

                    sorry abit delayed but finally got it

                      Spaniel is very wise & understanding.  take his words/advice to heart & you will find more peace/balance in your life

                        Spaniel is very wise & understanding.  take his words/advice to heart & you will find more peace/balance in your life

                         

                        I read that as "more peace/bananas in your life".  

                        "Because in the end, you won't remember the time you spent working in the office or mowing your lawn.  Climb that goddamn mountain."

                        Jack Kerouac


                        Consistently Slow


                           

                          In order to get past the run/walk thing, I suggest you just quit walking.  I know that sounds stupid simple, and you don't want to run that slow, but honestly if you have to run slower than you walk to keep running that DO IT.  Over time this will help you improve.  Continuing to put in walking may help you cover the distance....and it's an OK transitory tactic...but it's not doing much to actually get you to a point where you can run continuously.  Even if the distance you cover is shorter, I'd slow down and do the continuous run most days.

                           

                           Firstly,spaniel probably as forgotten more about running than I know.

                           

                          I disagree with his stop walking and keep running.28 months of LHR training. Walking the hills to keep HR down when needed. BQ'ed in 2011.The injure bug stay at bay and the miles increased (2000+). When you are walking just  visualize  you are doing a 50K.

                          Run until the trail runs out.

                          2013***1500 miles

                          50 miler

                          Race Less Train More

                           

                          Ana Trason  "Living Her Life"

                          "The Marble in The Groove"

                           

                          unsolicited chatter

                          http://bkclay.blogspot.com/


                          Feeling the growl again

                             

                             

                            I disagree with his stop walking and keep running.28 months of LHR training. Walking the hills to keep HR down when needed. BQ'ed in 2011.The injure bug stay at bay and the miles increased (2000+). When you are walking just  visualize  you are doing a 50K.

                             

                            There is more than one way to skin a cat.  And I won't pretend my advice applies to someone thinking of ultras.  I'm not qualified to give advice on that.

                             

                            Believe it or not I now figure it has been 21-22 years since I was getting into running via run/walk.  I admit bias as my first coach told me to quit walking and run whatever I needed to in order to get through and I'd see improvement.  My first two races I was beaten by people run/walking I was so slow.

                            "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                             


                            Consistently Slow

                              So true

                              Run until the trail runs out.

                              2013***1500 miles

                              50 miler

                              Race Less Train More

                               

                              Ana Trason  "Living Her Life"

                              "The Marble in The Groove"

                               

                              unsolicited chatter

                              http://bkclay.blogspot.com/

                                Ok, I'll admit I have no credentials in the running world and have only been running distance for 4 years, but I have to agree with those who said to start enjoying running.  Running is not supposed to add stress to your life.  In high school I was fairly competitive and would push myself a lot.  At that time in my life, I could manage to do that.  However, life has changed, priorities have changed, and thus running goals have changed.  I'm in university now, I have a permanent knee problem that I still have to baby sometimes, and I've started my own business on the side.  I don't run as much as I used to, but I still get out for 5-7km most days, even if it's 10:00pm before I get out.   It works with my lifestyle now.  I enjoy it, it's a great stress relief, and it keeps me in decent shape.  I'm at peace with the fact I won't likely hit sub-20 for a 5k now (that was my goal throughout hs), that's no longer my goal in running.

                                MTA:  I started running distance in gr. 10, now I'm in university.   I was a sprinter before gr. 10.  

                                'No matter how slow you go, you're still lapping everyone on the couch'

                                 

                                "Running is a big question mark that's there each and every day. It asks you, 'Are you going to be a wimp or are you going to be strong today?'"  - Peter Maher

                                 

                                "Running long and hard is an ideal antidepressant, since it's hard to run and feel sorry for yourself at the same time. Also, there are those hours of clearheadedness that follow a long run."  -Monte Davis

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