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Struggling at the Moment (Read 418 times)

ckerr1999


    I have been running now for almost two years. I started in August 2012. I ran my first marathon last October and finished a disappointing 4:09. At that point I decided I to either continue to running with a goal of qualifying for Boston in the next couple of years or quit. So over the winter I started running a lot harder and dropped my time average time per mile from above 9:00/mile to low 8:00/mile with a lot more miles well below 8:00/mile. As well I was running a lot more miles (high 40s per week.) But I have been really struggling the last few weeks. Mostly because I have a lot of crap (and stress) going on in the rest of my life at the moment. Right now it is a struggle just to get out the door on a daily basis. And if I do make it out the door I am exhausted from the rest of the day. So whereas 6 miles should be a piece of cake for me, its a struggle at the moment to get past 3 or 4 miles.  I am registered to run the Chicago Marathon in October, but getting really worried as the marathon is 19 weeks away, and I am suppose to be going into my peak training phase. I am suppose to do a long run tomorrow of 14-15 miles, but I am just hoping I make it 10 miles.  I must confess this past week I thought of quitting more then once, but I don't want to throw 2 years of hard work away. Any advice?? Thanks.

     

     

     

     

    jimmyb


      Abnormally high (for you) mental stress can affect your running. It's the excess hormones. If you can't reduce the stress, try cutting back on your training volume until you get to an equilibrium where you feel you're regaining some desire and energy. During high stress, it's easy to over-train, so do what it takes to remain healthy until the stress lifts. Once it does, you'll return to form fairly quickly (that's been my experience). Life.

      Log    PRs

        Get your hemoglobin checked. Make sure you're not anemic.

          It's normal to have that feeling, especially when there's a lot of stress in your life, but I have to wonder if you're not making it worse for yourself. You changed your goal dramatically and it's certainly possible that your body just needs more time to adapt. If your training schedule is overwhelming you, at the very least I would look at taking some extra rest days. In the recent cycle leading up to my first marathon, I took a couple of double rest days when I wasn't getting the results I was looking for, and overall I was pleased with the result. Double back when you have to. Don't let adherence to a goal you made in the past or your current training schedule blind you to taking rest when you need it.

           

          And don't underestimate the effect that sustained stress has on your energy levels. If you can do something about it, do it. If not, adjust your goals. Seriously.

           

          Additionally: you have PLENTY of time

            Stress can be the absolute worse thing for one's well being. It is very unhealthy when the individual has too much of it. Most of us use running as a stress relief. IMO, if this isn't working for you, then I see 2 options. First, do as others have mentioned and reduce the stress if possible. Second, you could be putting too much upon yourself with the higher volume of faster runs. Drop the pace back for a couple of weeks to see if your general fatigue goes away.

            backothepack


              My advise is to take a step back and remember why you started running in the first place.

                I agree, if life is stressing you out right now and running is hard, then back off your pace and just do easy miles for a couple of weeks until you feel better. Pushing so hard with increasing pace AND mileage is hard to maintain for to long. back off and cut yourself a break!

                  ckerr

                   

                  I'm at the exact spot you are right now.  struggling last few weeks   added stress at home & work + some physical issues going on not  related to running.   some great advice here for both of us or anyone else who is struggling.   DNS at 10k last week & have 5k tomorrow.  have no idea how I will do so just going to stick with  a positive attitude & have fun with it.  best advice I would have would be to not quit.  back off the pace for awhile maybe but don't quit!!   find some fun trails or running partner.  I have also lost my Wed am track partner for rest of year due to upcoming knee surgery. She has been a great motivator.  I'm hoping to join up with a local running club for their Wed night track wo"s if can get Wed nights off from work.  Wont totally replace Rose but should help gettiing mojo back.

                    having goals definitely helps as well.   of course I have the goal of continuing to give myself the opportunities to at least challenge PR times & AG placings.  but main goal is to continue streak of 100+ miles/month & maintain current weight & overall fitness.  streak is at 59 consecutive months & June will be 5 years straight.   so setting overall goals & also lower level long term or short term goals is very helpful.  good luck & keep moving forward one step at a time!


                    Gang Name "Pound Cake"

                      You are running way too fast and are fatigued. You need a week off, don't quit, just a vacation. Then pick running back up slowly. Follow a marathon recovery program. Perhaps something like, week 1- 20 miles, week 2-30 miles, week 3-40 miles. Then follow a good training program like a Pfitzinger plan that mixes long or fast and hard with truly easy and short days.

                       

                      I don't know your age (I'm 53 on only been running 18 months), but my 1/2 marathon time is 40 seconds per mile faster than yours, yet you are running your "easy" runs a good 40-60 seconds faster than me (and I think I often run mine too fast). Your 1/2 marathon pace is 8:36 and yet you have have a so-called recovery run at 8:37 pace. Where's the fire?  Nearly all your runs are faster than your marathon pace. You even have easy runs 20 seconds per mile faster than your 1/2 pace. Basically, all your weekly mileage has been racing. It's a wonder you haven't had a stress fracture or blown up in some other way.

                       

                      I suggest:

                       

                      1-Take a week off, then slowly come back as above.

                      2-After the above rest, and a week of VERY EASY running, run a 5k, 10k, or 1/2 as you need a more recent race to set your paces.

                      3-Use a McMillian pace calculator or one from Runner's world to find your paces. Don't run always at the fast end of the range.

                      4-Follow a Hard, easy, hard, easy, easy, hard, easy kind of schedule. The easy days need to be much easier than you've been running and the hard days hard. You need some real recovery pace runs (think 9:40 to 10:10 pace) after intervals and tempo runs. You can't run recovery runs too slowly - they are just time on the feet.

                      - Scott

                      2014 Goals: First Marathon - BQ2016 <3:40 (3:25:18) - 1/2M <1:45 - 5K <22:00

                      2014 Marathons: 05/04 Flying Pig (3:49:02) - 09/20 Air Force (BQ 3:25:18) - 11/01 Indianapolis Monumental


                      Feeling the growl again

                        You are running way too fast and are fatigued. You need a week off, don't quit, just a vacation. Then pick running back up slowly. Follow a marathon recovery program. Perhaps something like, week 1- 20 miles, week 2-30 miles, week 3-40 miles. Then follow a good training program like a Pfitzinger plan that mixes long or fast and hard with truly easy and short days.

                         

                        I don't know your age (I'm 53 on only been running 18 months), but my 1/2 marathon time is 40 seconds per mile faster than yours, yet you are running your "easy" runs a good 40-60 seconds faster than me (and I think I often run mine too fast). Your 1/2 marathon pace is 8:36 and yet you have have a so-called recovery run at 8:37 pace. Where's the fire?  Nearly all your runs are faster than your marathon pace. You even have easy runs 20 seconds per mile faster than your 1/2 pace. Basically, all your weekly mileage has been racing. It's a wonder you haven't had a stress fracture or blown up in some other way.

                         

                        I suggest:

                         

                        1-Take a week off, then slowly come back as above.

                        2-After the above rest, and a week of VERY EASY running, run a 5k, 10k, or 1/2 as you need a more recent race to set your paces.

                        3-Use a McMillian pace calculator or one from Runner's world to find your paces. Don't run always at the fast end of the range.

                        4-Follow a Hard, easy, hard, easy, easy, hard, easy kind of schedule. The easy days need to be much easier than you've been running and the hard days hard. You need some real recovery pace runs (think 9:40 to 10:10 pace) after intervals and tempo runs. You can't run recovery runs too slowly - they are just time on the feet.

                         

                        This looks like a pretty good analysis.

                         

                        While having goals can be motivating and helpful, if your only goal is to BQ in 2 years or you will quit then you are going to have a rough go of it.  Running can have its ups and downs.  Sometimes the goal will seem within reach, sometimes it may seem a far off dream.  But if that goal is the only thing motivating you...and you put a relatively short horizon on achieving it with the decision to quit of you don't think you'll get it...it's a bit of a self-fulfilling prophesy.

                         

                        I see nothing wrong with wanting to run Boston, but I have a hard time connecting with the desire to just quit if you don't get there or perhaps the day after running victoriously down Boylston Streen.  Running is such a positive thing in a person's life.  I'd recommend you really think over why you are running.  If you really enjoy running, expand your reason for running beyond BQ and enjoy the process.  Because some days it will suck and if you don't enjoy the days that don't either you will not make it.  If your only reason for putting 2 years of effort in is to run Boston then you have better desire to focus on a single event than me.

                        "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                         

                           

                          This looks like a pretty good analysis.

                           

                          While having goals can be motivating and helpful, if your only goal is to BQ in 2 years or you will quit then you are going to have a rough go of it.  Running can have its ups and downs.  Sometimes the goal will seem within reach, sometimes it may seem a far off dream.  But if that goal is the only thing motivating you...and you put a relatively short horizon on achieving it with the decision to quit of you don't think you'll get it...it's a bit of a self-fulfilling prophesy.

                           

                          I see nothing wrong with wanting to run Boston, but I have a hard time connecting with the desire to just quit if you don't get there or perhaps the day after running victoriously down Boylston Streen.  Running is such a positive thing in a person's like.  I'd recommend you really think over why you are running.  If you realie you enjoy running, expand your reason for running beyond BQ and enjoy the process.  Because some days it will suck and if you don't enjoy the days that don't either you will not make it.  If your only reason for putting 2 years of effort in is to run Boston then you have better desire to focus on a single event than me.

                           

                          Spaniel,

                          Thank you.  This is what I wanted to write.

                          A goal time for a race is the game within the game.

                          For me, running is a lifestyle.  I want to run a Boston Marathon when I'm 84 years old.  I don't care about running it when I'm 42 years old.  I'm training for the 2056 Boston Marathon and hope to be there Smile.  I doubt I'll have the opportunity to run it before then, but maybe I will.

                          2014 Goals:

                          #1: Do what I can do. <DOING>

                          #2: 365 Hours training <NOPE, INJURED>

                           

                            Right now it is a struggle just to get out the door on a daily basis. And if I do make it out the door I am exhausted from the rest of the day. So whereas 6 miles should be a piece of cake for me, its a struggle at the moment to get past 3 or 4 miles. 

                             

                            This is a classic description of overtraining.  The only cure is rest.  Take a week completely off, then start back slowly.  You have speed, you now need to build endurance.

                             

                            Your marathon pace is 9:30 MPM.  Most of your training runs should be slower than that.  Try recovery runs at about 11:00 MPM, long runs at about 10:30 MPM.  And tempo runs at about 8:30 MPM for the tempo portion.


                            CT JEFF

                              sorry to hear about the stress. (1) are you sleeping enough? stress can mess up your sleep patterns. (2) it seems you are racing every run. most runs should be run at a slower pace, but speedwork should fit into your week. (3) id also love to run Boston, but maybe you need to focus on a smaller goal first. Faster half? Faster 5k? actually. I dont see any races, at all listed.

                               

                              Your first FM at 4:09 is better than I am currently after 18 months of training. But at this point, I would consider scrapping your plan. It seems you are doing 14-15 miles at 8:09-8:20 pace. I dont know your gender or age, but that doesnt seem close enough to qualify for 2015 regardless of what choices you make today. Best wishes.

                              RUN SAFE.     Barefoot 1st: 6/9/13. PR: 5k=22:50 10k=47:46 HM 1:51. FM 4:28

                               

                              October 11 Sat 8am Hartford Marathon.

                              November 15 Sat 12:30pm- Spartan Race with DW in Fenway

                              Jan 1 Gordys First Race. 10k. Jan 18 Disneyland Star Wars HM 5:30am

                                There are lots of wise words above.  I would just add that something like 90% of runners don't qualify for Boston, yet they have plenty of good reasons to run.  Enjoy your running, enjoy your resulting fitness!

                                Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

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