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indoor field hockey sticks? (Read 179 times)


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    does anyone know if there is a a meaningful difference between an indoor and an outdoor stick?  If my 6th grader is going to do an indoor field hockey academy (just six sessions, no formal team play) can she use her outdoor stick?

      does anyone know if there is a a meaningful difference between an indoor and an outdoor stick?  If my 6th grader is going to do an indoor field hockey academy (just six sessions, no formal team play) can she use her outdoor stick?

      My daughter played indoor field hockey the last 3 winters and always used her outdoor stick. I'd never heard of an indoor stick until this thread.

      Runners run.

      MrH


        Yes, in the indoor game there is no hitting (driving) of the ball, and so the sticks are thinner and lighter, but otherwise appear similar. Because they are thinner it is easier to flick the ball with an indoor stick, and they are a little more maneuverable.

         

        Ask the coach/organizer. For a short course they will likely allow use of an outdoor stick, or have a supply of indoor sticks available. Frankly, if you are paying for the course they should do this if they are a professional outfit. A not-for profit club I'm involved with has a stock of 30 loaners for the new kids to use before they buy one.

         

        Because of their lighter workload, the indoor sticks are simpler construction and lower cost, and until a player is at a higher level they will do fine with a stick costing less than $30, if she decides that she wants to play more than the course.

        The process is the goal.

        Men heap together the mistakes of their lives, and create a monster they call Destiny.

        Julia1971


          Yes, in the indoor game there is no hitting (driving) of the ball, and so the sticks are thinner and lighter, but otherwise appear similar. Because they are thinner it is easier to flick the ball with an indoor stick, and they are a little more maneuverable.

           

          Ask the coach/organizer. For a short course they will likely allow use of an outdoor stick, or have a supply of indoor sticks available. Frankly, if you are paying for the course they should do this if they are a professional outfit. A not-for profit club I'm involved with has a stock of 30 loaners for the new kids to use before they buy one.

           

          Because of their lighter workload, the indoor sticks are simpler construction and lower cost, and until a player is at a higher level they will do fine with a stick costing less than $30, if she decides that she wants to play more than the course.

           

          +1.  Check to see if the organizers require one and if so, spend the least amount of money on one as you can.  I wish we lived closer or I would loan her mine.

           

          ETA: I'm not sure what they'll be doing in this league and what rules they're following but you may want to buy her an indoor glove.  In indoor, there are a lot more opportunities for getting your knuckles scraped.

          You're too strong not to keep on keepin' on. - The Pips
          Yes, I am! - Gladys Knight


          Best Present Ever

            Thanks everyone. I think we'll show up to the first session with her outdoor stick and see what happens. When did kids get so expensive?


            Best Present Ever

              If anyone ever has this question in the future - we're several weeks into the session and most of the girls are playing with their outdoor sticks. No one worried about it. My next question- what is the difference in girls lax sticks?  I was just looking at them and the only variation I could see was in the design (or lack) on the handle and the colors.Prices go from $30 to $150 for equipment that looked identical to me.

              Julia1971


                I'm glad it worked out for you but I don't think that's the best general advice.  People really should check with the organizers.  For a one or two-day, no contact, skills-type session thing like it sounds like your daughter might be doing - yeah, an indoor stick is probably not required but there's no harm in asking.  My league requires indoor sticks for indoor play.  (If there's going to be one-on-ones or scrimmaging, both players should be playing with the same type of stick).

                 

                I don't know anything about LAX.

                 

                If anyone ever has this question in the future - we're several weeks into the session and most of the girls are playing with their outdoor sticks. No one worried about it. My next question- what is the difference in girls lax sticks?  I was just looking at them and the only variation I could see was in the design (or lack) on the handle and the colors.Prices go from $30 to $150 for equipment that looked identical to me.

                You're too strong not to keep on keepin' on. - The Pips
                Yes, I am! - Gladys Knight

                MrH


                  Kids can run track in basketball shoes. But I wouldn't recommend it.

                  The process is the goal.

                  Men heap together the mistakes of their lives, and create a monster they call Destiny.