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Bike advice (Read 2146 times)


Slow-smooth-fast

    I am thinking of getting a bike to compliment my training. I am very naive in this respect, and anyone out there who can help regarding type of bike etc would be grateful. I am wanting to clock some miles on the road but not pay loads of cash. I live in uk so anyone any advice? Also anyone who already bikes as well as running, what impact does it have on the running? Better lactate tolerance? Better and stronger legs?

    "I've been following Eddy's improvement over the last two years on this site, and it's been pretty dang solid. Sure the weekly mileage has been up and down, but over the long haul he's getting out the door and has turned himself into quite a runner. He's only now just figuring out his potential. Consistency in running is measured in years, not weeks. And over the last couple of years, Eddy's made great strides" Jeff 14 Jan 2009


    Team HTFU NCTR Driver

      Always happy to help with the Velo-Curious! Got a budget in mind? I assume you're looking for a road bike, but in any case, you want to get a bike that's good enough to keep you from getting frustrated with the thing, without being so expensive that you can't get some of the necessary accessories. In my experience, figure roughly $1000 to get started (yeah, I know you're in the UK - I don't know if this will translate directly into how many quid ya gotta lay out. Hopefully with some component descriptions you'll be able to come up with a number in £.). That gets a good "starter" bike ( like a Trek Pilot 1.0, or similar), a helmet, an air pump, a basic tool kit (mostly a multi-tool that you can carry with you), and some clothes (proper bike shorts, maybe a jersey or two). Your first upgrade from all that would definitely be some clip-in pedals and bike shoes - that's worth spending some extra money on to get something that fits and works well. In terms of componentry, the starter bike is typically equipped with Shimano Sora or Tiagra parts. If you can spend a bit more, you'll get in to Shimano 105 parts - if you can swing it, I think that's worth shooting for, as that uses the same basic technology as Shimano's top-level Dura Ace parts. None of that is as important as finding a good bike shop, though - they'll get you fit to a bike properly. A bike that doesn't fit you won't get ridden, and then it's money wasted. did




      Needs more cowbell!

        Listen to did...he knows his bike stuff. He's a typical bike geek...almost has a different bike for every day of the week. Big grin k

        I shoot pretty things! ~

        '14 Goals:

        • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

        • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)


        Team HTFU NCTR Driver

          Listen to did...he knows his bike stuff. He's a typical bike geek...almost has a different bike for every day of the week. Big grin k
          One more to go! did




          Needs more cowbell!

            One more to go! did
            You're thinking about a cyclocross bike, ain't ya'?! Wink You know...if we had the space for a treadmill I would have the perfect excuse to buy one--I could get a really nice one for what you spend on a single bike. Big grin k

            I shoot pretty things! ~

            '14 Goals:

            • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

            • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)


            Awesome

              Hey didit, I'm also looking for a bike to start to convert into the Tri scene. How would that alter your recommendations? I'm definitely looking to stay under $1,000 for now - is it worth it to shop around on craigslist? It seems like people invest in some pretty nice bikes and then discover that the trick is actually using them. Thanks!
              Always happy to help with the Velo-Curious! did


              Team HTFU NCTR Driver

                Hey didit, I'm also looking for a bike to start to convert into the Tri scene. How would that alter your recommendations? I'm definitely looking to stay under $1,000 for now - is it worth it to shop around on craigslist? It seems like people invest in some pretty nice bikes and then discover that the trick is actually using them. Thanks!
                I'm leery of buying bikes online, particularly for a first bike. I don't know all that much about dedicated time trial/triathlon bikes, but I do know that they make lousy bikes for just going out for a ride - they're much more twitchy, handling-wise, and they position you much more forward, so you have more weight on your hands. That's fine once you're used to being on aero-bars, but those aren't something you just start to use; they definitely change handling. I'd still suggest a basic "starter" road bike, only more in the race-geometry area - I know a lot of people really like the Trek 1000. You could then have bolt-on aero bars added. That way, you wouldn't lose the versatility of the regular drop bars (and a lot of shops that have big group rides really frown on the dedicated aero bars in those rides - they're dangerous to other riders in a crash, as they generally have forward-pointing parts that can impale a person). Anyone else? Big grin did



                  I've been looking at possibly getting a hybrid bike next year. I'd be looking at using it for weekend rides and commutes to work... that's if I ever get close enough to my workplace. Thing that bothers me is riding on the street and getting run over.

                  Vim

                    I've been looking on Craigslist too but am beginning to think that's not such a great idea for my first bike. I'll liken it to my running shoes. When I first started running, I went to Sports Authority and just picked a pair of shoes that were on sale. Great deal on good looking shoes. But then, my feet really started to hurt after running over 4 miles. I finally went to a speciality running shop where I was fitted correctly. I required a stability shoe since I over pronated. Now my feet don't hurt on my long runs with the correct shoes. I'll think I'll do the same with my bike - go to a speciality bike store to get fitted correctly. Sure, I may pay a little more but with a well fitted bike, I'll enjoy the ride more. I've also been reading on a tri forum about the differences in geometery of tri bikes vs. road bikes. The same person may need different sizes for each type. I'm going to get a road bike first.
                    "If I control myself, I control my destiny."


                    Needs more cowbell!

                      I'll think I'll do the same with my bike - go to a speciality bike store to get fitted correctly. Sure, I may pay a little more but with a well fitted bike, I'll enjoy the ride more. I've also been reading on a tri forum about the differences in geometery of tri bikes vs. road bikes. The same person may need different sizes for each type. I'm going to get a road bike first.
                      Plus...don't discount the service after the sale aspect. A bike purchased from a specialty shop should have a warranty attached.

                      I shoot pretty things! ~

                      '14 Goals:

                      • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

                      • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

                      Mile Collector


                      Abs of Flabs

                        I agree with did about not buying a bike over the internet. I bought my bike from a bike shop and tried out several bikes. It was oddly strange that the comfort of the bike increases as the price increases. Anyway, you should definitely try them out before buying because $1,000 is a whole lot of money to spend. Erica: since you're in Arlington, I would recommend Belmont Wheelworks. That was where I bought my bike. Their service was pretty good too.
                          Ace Wheelworks in Somerville (same ownership as Belmont Wheelworks) is a good shop too, if that's closer to your end of Arlington. It's in the Porter/Davis Sq. area on Elm St. Smaller than the Belmont store but still good.

                          Runners run.

                            I agree with did about not buying a bike over the internet. I bought my bike from a bike shop and tried out several bikes. It was oddly strange that the comfort of the bike increases as the price increases. .
                            Big grin

                            Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the number of moments that take our breath away...(unkown)




                            Go With The Flow
                            Thyroid Support Group


                            Awesome

                              Ace Wheelworks in Somerville (same ownership as Belmont Wheelworks) is a good shop too, if that's closer to your end of Arlington. It's in the Porter/Davis Sq. area on Elm St. Smaller than the Belmont store but still good.
                              Thanks everyone for the tips! I think I'm going to start with a regular road bike. It's silly to spend a on of money I don't have, unless I plan to stick with it. I think the Somerville store is closer, or at least near my commute path. I'll try and stop by this week and get some advice.


                              Team Effort

                                Thanks everyone for the tips! I think I'm going to start with a regular road bike. It's silly to spend a on of money I don't have, unless I plan to stick with it. I think the Somerville store is closer, or at least near my commute path. I'll try and stop by this week and get some advice.
                                Good thinking. If you do not like the way you are being treated in the first shop you walk into, turn around and walk out and find another one. You can not overestimate service after the sale. I drive 2.5 hours to my bike shop just because of his comittment to service Wink
                                www.runninngahead.com/groups/5000MC/forum
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