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dogs with running logs (Read 200 times)

AbbyDog


    Any other dogs on here with running logs?  How many miles do you average each week?  I run about 35 right now.  I've been running with my persons since they adopted me in December.  I think I will be 2 in August.  I am extremely shy but running makes me more confident.  I'm getting over the shyness but still don't fully trust you humans.

     

    How do you deal with the heat?  I run early in the morning but sometimes the humidity make it tough.

     

    Any dogs training for anything?  I won my first race a few months ago.  Won a really nice leash and collar and my human got a fancy running water bottle.  I'm thinking about training for my first ultra in March.  I can train over the winter while it is cool.  My longest run ever has been 15 miles and had a week over 50 miles before it got hot.  Right now just trying to keep a base of about 35 per week.

     

    Hope to hear from other dogs and dog-friendly humans.

     

    AbbyDog

    (German Shepherd/possible Pit Bull mix)

      Ha!  This is so great.  I just adopted a yellow lab mix 3 days ago, and I set him up with his own running log...though I went with daily mile in order to entertain my sister and mom who use that site Wink

       

      He is just finishing heart-worm treatment, and so I need to take it easy for the hot/humid summer and for now he is a walker.  Will work him up to walk/run soon!

       

      Any advice on how to turn my new buddy into a running partner safely for him, would be great!

      marathonaddict


        Hey....AbbyDog. I'm Sophie, a 45-lb mix rescue dog: maybe hound, collie, boxer, pointer, you name it.  I'm about 3.5 yrs old and was adopted by my forever family in February 2012. I started running with my Mom in April 2012 after she was able to teach me how to walk/run nicely on a leash. We started training for a marathon last year. My longest run was 15 miles but then Mom got injured and we had to take a bit of a break. We're back at it again although we are only 4 weeks into the new marathon training program so I haven't gotten to go that far again (yet). I like 15 miles - finally tired me out :-) My Mom did warn me that  I will not get to run the marathon with her but at least I get to train with her. Who needs a medal and a running shirt? Mom did mention something about getting me a special tag for my collar when we finish this training program to let everyone know I am a marathoner at heart.

         

        Before we started training for this year's marathon I was averaging about 30 miles per week - I could go a LOT further if Mom could/would let me. My mom runs slow compared to how fast I like to run but I'm pretty good about running her pace. Gives me plenty of time to use my hound nose to sniff things out....like bunnies, moles and squirrels. That's when I kick it into high gear. Mom calls it my "bunny hunting pace" - not sure what that exactly means but it's FAST and FUN and we do not get to do it very much.

         

        I have been complimented while out on our runs that I am well behaved. And I am - most of the time. Occasionally another dog gets me too excited while we are out running and I act a little naughty/rambunctious. Let me just say that other dogs should NOT run faster than me. It's just not fair :-) If my Mom was not attached to me at the waist I could outrun them all.

         

        I live in Washington State so it doesn't get too hot here. During the week I run at 4:30AM before Mom goes to work so I manage to stay pretty comfortable. And when it does get warmer - like on our long runs on Sundays - she wets me down at all of our water spots and does her best to convince me to drink water. Not always an easy task for her because I would rather keep running. And sometimes she lets me go for a quick swim in the water that runs along our running trail. She's so awesome.

         

        I do not  have my own running log but Mom created a new workout type to track when she runs with me so I know how far I've run - 1396 miles together so far. What a cool Mom !

         

        Congrats on winning your 1st race ! Wow - an ultra. Wish I could convince my mom that we need to do one of those.

         

        AMKinCO - Mom says the best way to turn your dog into a runner is to gradually build him up to walking 4 miles at a time consistently. Do not let him tug on the leash. If he tugs - the game is over and you should not move forward. Look up clicker training - it has helped my Mom teach me lots of things besides how to walk/run politely on a leash. In fact - I know about 45 commands/tricks. She even taught me left, right, straight and cross (the street) to help steer me in the direction she wants to go when we are on a run. Once he gets that nailed down then slowly incorporate some running intervals until you both feel comfortable that he can manage non-stop running. Be aware of his paws - they need to toughen up to handle running consistently. Try to keep him running on grass if possible .My vet's suggestion although I don't always listen to him.  And don't forget to bring pooper bags with you - never know when he's going to surprise you with a quick pit stop. I do it to my mom every once in a great while just to keep her on her toes :-) Above all else - enjoy running with him. It will change your running life (for the better).

        AbbyDog


          Start out slow with 2 - 4 mile runs and work up to longer distance and speed over several months.  I started out kind of fast but overall no problems although I did cut my paw on something in the yard and had to take a few days off running one time.  A waist leash is an option or just a light leash works well but use a collar that your friend can't get out of.  The combo collars work well and don't cut off circulation to the neck.

           

          Abby

           

          Ha!  This is so great.  I just adopted a yellow lab mix 3 days ago, and I set him up with his own running log...though I went with daily mile in order to entertain my sister and mom who use that site Wink

           

          He is just finishing heart-worm treatment, and so I need to take it easy for the hot/humid summer and for now he is a walker.  Will work him up to walk/run soon!

           

          Any advice on how to turn my new buddy into a running partner safely for him, would be great!


          The Stinky Black Bitch

            Sometimes I poop when I run.


            No Talent Drips

              I'm Fecking Nemo's shoes. I am a pair of Asics DS Racers with about 625 miles and my sides are blown out. I'm not sure what happened to me, but I smell like cat pee. Don't you guys hate the smell of cat pee?


              BTW, I think you might be...nuts. From one anthropomorphized logger to another.

               Dei Gratia

               


              sugnim

                I thought about keeping a log for my dog, mostly just to track her calories in & out since she needs to gain a few pounds.  However, I found that since she runs up and down the trails, dashes down hills to splash in creeks, and is prone to darting after mice, butterflies, and birds, it would be nearly impossible for me to know how far she really ran.  I estimate that she probably runs 3-4 times as far as I do on every run.

                 

                To deal with the heat, we run on shady trails and try to pass at least one natural water source on every run.  Also, for longer runs, she wears a little back pack with water & a collapsible bowl.  I know when she's ready for a drink because she'll nudge my water bottle that I carry or she will stare at me as I drink.


                Cheap and Evil Girl

                  Hey Abby!  I run with a German shepherd.  He is a big boy, 28" at the withers and a lean 80 -85 pounds.  He says running in the heat sucks, but the bugs are even worse.  He is glad I have him on Advantix2 so that he doesn't have as many biting flies bothering his ears.  And we have lots of ticks around here too, bad news those nasty things.

                   

                  We run semi-early in the morning, leave the house at 7:30.   We run trail, so he is off leash most of the time unless we see someone and then I leash him up.  He is not a big fan of strangers, and tells them so.  I don't mind him doing that since I like people to think they better leave me alone!  We pass several small streams on our ten mile runs, and if he needs a drink he will get one.  I don't run very fast so he has plenty of time to catch up.

                   

                  The only downside to him being off leash is when a critter crosses the trail.  I make sure I have a pocket full of treats so I can reward him when I call him off the chase.  He is a really good boy and will only take a few steps after a deer before he comes back to me.

                   

                  On a big week, he might log close to 60 miles because my husband runs with him too.  He is getting the week off though since both of us are injured at the moment.  He doesn't mind the break.  The farthest he has ever run at one time is 13 miles.  The most he has ever run in a single day is 15 miles.

                   

                  Because shepherds can have bad hips, we made sure that his hips (and elbows) looked good on x ray before we began running.  He started running when he was a year old (he just turned four).  We also have him on a daily joint supplement called Glycoflex, because we figure it can't hurt.

                   

                  Abby I am glad you are taking your human out running.  Dogs make the very best running partners.

                   

                  ETA: Because he is drinking from natural water sources, we make sure he is vaccinated against leptospirosis and we keep an eye out for Giardia symptoms.

                  I HAVE NO IDEA WHAT I AM DOING.  

                   

                  "Mental toughness is built by doing something that is hard over and over again, especially when you don't feel like doing it. Our society has conditioned us to believe that there should be no discomfort, to stop when we are uncomfortable. But the discomfort we feel when we're doing a challenging workout is an important part of the strengthening process." -Jim Afremow, The Champion's Mind: How Great Athletes Think, Train, and Thrive