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treadmill incline queestion (Read 7083 times)

psycrunner


    Warning: This is a really novice question! I'm running the Country Music Half Marathon next weekend. I've read that the course is "hilly". I looked at the elevation map on RA, but have no idea how elevation changes relate to the incline % on my treadmill. I've run some "hills" on my treadmill (up to a 7% incline), but am wondering if that will have been enough preparation for next weekend. Anyone got any thoughts for this beginning runner? Thanks! Carol
    Carol


    Member Since 2008

      I really think you need to get off the treadmill and do a little more ground work. There's nothing like the real thing. The best part is the fresh air in your lungs. Try to only use the treadmill for VERY lousy weather days.
        besides, it makes a different to run on real ground. The impact on your joints/muscles is different. Ideally you should train on the race route to get used to it.
        Will be weightlifting and running to get into the best shape I can before turning 40. Here are my progress pictures: http://tinyurl.com/584qwt
        va


          Warning: This is a really novice question! I'm running the Country Music Half Marathon next weekend. I've read that the course is "hilly". I looked at the elevation map on RA, but have no idea how elevation changes relate to the incline % on my treadmill. I've run some "hills" on my treadmill (up to a 7% incline), but am wondering if that will have been enough preparation for next weekend. Anyone got any thoughts for this beginning runner? Thanks! Carol
          The incline or angle is the inverse tangent of the elevation change divided by the distance on the course. For example, if there is a 100 foot elevation increase over a 1 mile of the race course, the incline is calulated as follows: First, convert feet of elevation change to miles: 100 feet * 1 mile/5280 feet = 0.0189 miles. Second, divide the elevation change by the distance on the course: 0.0189 miles/1 mile = 0.0189 Third, take the inverse tangent of this number: incline = inverse tan 0.0189 = 1 degree You can look at the elevation graph to find the incline of particular hills on the CMHM course. Who said the math you learned in high school would never come in handy? Btw, treadmills are great for hill work-outs since you can easily control the incline. I don't know anything about the hills at the CMHM, but if you've trained with 7% incline, you will probably be in good shape. Anyway, it's probably not a good idea to try some intense hill work with less than a week until you HM.
          psycrunner


            Stephen (VA123)-- Thank you SO much for that very helpful answer to my treadmill incline queestion (perhaps I need to proofread before I post?). I think I'll be fine on the course, given what I have been doing as training. Also, thank you so much for reminding me of the pain of high school math! Carol
            Carol


            I've got a fever...

              The incline or angle is the inverse tangent of the elevation change divided by the distance on the course. For example, if there is a 100 foot elevation increase over a 1 mile of the race course, the incline is calulated as follows: First, convert feet of elevation change to miles: 100 feet * 1 mile/5280 feet = 0.0189 miles. Second, divide the elevation change by the distance on the course: 0.0189 miles/1 mile = 0.0189 Third, take the inverse tangent of this number: incline = inverse tan 0.0189 = 1 degree
              True. But if you want to think in terms of %incline instead of incline angle, no need to use the arctangent, just multiply your step 2 result by 100 to get %incline. %incline ≈ (elevation change)/(distance run)*100% For for the above example %incline = (100 ft)/(5280 ft)*100% = 1.89% same as above. We are technically using a sine calculation (the distance run on the course is the hypotenuse), whereas %grade is defined as tangent-based. However, sine≈tangent for small angles. Carol, working backwards from your 7% equates to about 370 feet in elevation gained per mile run. ( .07 * 5280 ft/mi = 369.8 ft ) Very tough indeed! Smile

              On your deathbed, you won't wish that you'd spent more time at the office.  But you will wish that you'd spent more time running.  Because if you had, you wouldn't be on your deathbed.

              va


                True. But if you want to think in terms of %incline instead of incline angle, no need to use the arctangent, just multiply your step 2 result by 100 to get %incline. %incline ≈ (elevation change)/(distance run)*100% For for the above example %incline = (100 ft)/(5280 ft)*100% = 1.89% same as above.
                Yes, you're right. Thanks for pointing that out.
                We are technically using a sine calculation (the distance run on the course is the hypotenuse), whereas %grade is defined as tangent-based. However, sine≈tangent for small angles.
                Hmm, I don't think Google maps consider the elevation (i.e., distance is the adjacent side of the triangle rather than the hypotenuse). Wasn't there a thread recently on that topic?
                Carol, working backwards from your 7% equates to about 370 feet in elevation gained per mile run. ( .07 * 5280 ft/mi = 369.8 ft ) Very tough indeed! Smile


                I've got a fever...

                  Hmm, I don't think Google maps consider the elevation (i.e., distance is the adjacent side of the triangle rather than the hypotenuse). Wasn't there a thread recently on that topic?
                  Oh yeah, good call-- Gmaps doesn't correct for elevation. So if you use a Gmap source, you're technically using tangent. If your distance is based on a course measurement from a wheel, bike, or car, you're using sine Fortunately, they're almost identical at small angles, so the trig function becomes a moot point. So if Gmaps says 100 ft over 5280, 100/5280 = 1.8939% grade Calculating sine for the same triangle gives 100/5280.95 = 1.8936% grade So I guess if we stick with %incline ≈ (elevation change)/(distance run)*100%, it's all good! Big grin So

                  On your deathbed, you won't wish that you'd spent more time at the office.  But you will wish that you'd spent more time running.  Because if you had, you wouldn't be on your deathbed.

                  psycrunner


                    Jeff & Stephen-- Thanks so much....one less thing to worry about as I travel to Nashville! Carol
                    Carol


                    A Dance with Monkeys

                      Globule. Wrong!! How did I miss this? Grade is different from angle. Angle is calculated as you describe, using trig and all that. But grade is calculated as a simple % rise over run. Grade is measured in feet of rise divided by feet of run. A course that raises 500 feet in one mile has a grade of (500/5280) = 0.094 = 9.4% Pikes Peak marathon rises 7500 feet net in 13.1 miles. Its average grade is (7500/(13.1*5280)) = = 10.8%
                      julieleblanc13


                        wow...i think id rather chance the hills than have to do this math! Smile

                        we dont have hills in my area so the treadmill has to do!

                          wow...i think id rather chance the hills than have to do this math! Smile

                          we dont have hills in my area so the treadmill has to do!

                           

                          this thread had been dormant for nearly 3 years.


                          Am I doing this right?

                            Does this mean it qualifies as a Zombie thread?  I'm not even sure zombie covers it...is there a level above that?

                            No excuses....

                              Does this mean it qualifies as a Zombie thread?  I'm not even sure zombie covers it...is there a level above that?

                               

                              The undead? Zombies are technically not undead as they are reanimated corpses, but vampires? Well, they're undead Tongue

                              Never forget the man who mistook his wife for a hat!

                              Ποτέ δεν ξεχνά τον άνθρωπο που μπέρδεψε τη γυναίκα του για ένα καπέλο!

                              xor


                                Oh it is definitely a zombie thread.  Some zombies are just more powerful than others.

                                 

                                I should have come up with another name besides 'zombie thread' given the overpopularity of the zombie genre.

                                 

                                Ah well.  Live and learn.  And then die and come back to eat brains.

                                 

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