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When is it time for a rest (Read 908 times)


Slow-smooth-fast

    Noob here, so any advice from you guys would be great. As a lot of you are aware I am in training for my first 10K so just trying to do my own thing to be ready for it. The problem I experience was last night, I started out on an easy run, 2 mile into it, I was so shattered I had to return. I did an 11 miler the night before, could this have had such an impact on last nights performance? It was kind of strnge, I felt like I had failed as I couldn't run any further which has never happened to me before. 12 Days to my race now, if any of you have any advice or a little training guide for the run upo that would be fantastic, as I dont want tihs to happen to me on the big day. Much appreciated. BTW, I am thinking that I am going to have a night off tonight to recover 100%, is this advisable or should I be hitting the road?

    "I've been following Eddy's improvement over the last two years on this site, and it's been pretty dang solid. Sure the weekly mileage has been up and down, but over the long haul he's getting out the door and has turned himself into quite a runner. He's only now just figuring out his potential. Consistency in running is measured in years, not weeks. And over the last couple of years, Eddy's made great strides" Jeff 14 Jan 2009

    RunningHammer


      everyone follows different training programmes so this varies, but for me, i have 2 days rest every week. I run Monday,Tuesday,Wednesday, with a speed workout, medium distance @ easy pace, then a shorter run @ steady pace, this is followed by a days rest on Thursday. On Friday i run a short run @ easy pace, then on Saturday I do a long run @ slow pace, this is followed by a day's rest on Sunday. I think the general rule is, that where you have a long run each week this should be followed by a day's rest. But then i'd still consider myself a beginner too Wink
        It's pretty normal to take a day off after a long run. Perhaps this is why. Everyone has days when they can't do what they think they should be doing. That's also normal. Your first race is 10K... 6.2 miles... and you've already shown yourself that you can run 11. So... lighten up, man! You've already shown that you can cover the distance. For a first race, anything else is just icing on the cake. Make the week right before the race easier, and make sure to take at least one day off before your race. Maybe two. If you feel you need a night off to recover, then take it. You're more likely to hurt yourself by overtraining than by undertraining at this point...

        Roads were made for journeys...

          I agree with previous posters; I believe that day would have best served as a rest day. If you're not convinced that's the case, chalk it up as a bad run. There are days when I got out there and just "couldn't do it" for one reason or another.


          Slow-smooth-fast

            Appreicate all your responses, great to have you guys to help out. I am still feeling it today, so I have taken the executive decision not to go out tonight. Instead I am going to do a couple relaxing lengths at the local swimming pool, and back on the road tommorrow.

            "I've been following Eddy's improvement over the last two years on this site, and it's been pretty dang solid. Sure the weekly mileage has been up and down, but over the long haul he's getting out the door and has turned himself into quite a runner. He's only now just figuring out his potential. Consistency in running is measured in years, not weeks. And over the last couple of years, Eddy's made great strides" Jeff 14 Jan 2009

              In several books on running and strength training there is a consistent story that exercise stresses the body, and during rest afterward is when the body repairs itself and gets stronger. They emphasize the importance of rest and of not overtraining. Overtraining can actually wear you down instead of build you up, and increases the chance of injury. (It seems the number one rule of running is avoid injury.) Taking a day of rest after a long run seems widely recommended. I'm a noob to running, and when I first started I was running almost every day. I was finding that I was tired all the time--the opposite of what I was shooting for. After I read about rest, I dropped back to running no more than once every 2 to 3 days. I feel much better, and I'm still seeing continuous improvement in speed and distance.
                Hi - I would also consider myself a newbie only having started this April. If I might be so bold I think you may have jumped the gun with the distance and pace that you did it at. I think your body is now letting you know that. You seem to have gone from an 8 mile (longest run) straight up to 11 miles whereas the perceived wisdom is that you should generally increase distance no more than 10% at a time. Your longer runs (initially) should be at a slower pace - perhaps 1-2 mins per mile slower - to give your body time to adjust. Also if you are training for a 10k at the moment shorter, faster runs may be the best at the moment then build up more miles if you are also training for longer distance events. My own experience is that I can run 6-8 miles comfortably every day but faster work or longer distance require me to take more rest or slower pace for a while afterwards. Age may be more of an issue in this for me but I think generally the same rules apply. I made the classic newbie mistake of wanting to push on with my training and one day when I was feeling good I went out 8 miles. Trouble is when you have gone 8 miles it means 8 miles to get back and the result was that I ended up walking/jogging the last 3 miles feeling tired and overstretched. I'm due a long run soon - I will have to let you know how I get on. Good luck

                2013

                3000 miles

                Sub 19:00 for 5K  05-03-13 Clee Prom 5K - 19:00:66 that was bloody close!

                Sub-40:00 for 10K 17-03-13 Gainsborough 10K - 39:43

                Sub 88:00 for HM

                 

                  Clopper, Are you using any sort of training program or guidelines for your 10K? I'm pretty new as well, but I have had much better results over the past few weeks by following a program that another runner help me establish. I know what to expect and how hard I should be training on different days. Currently, I am training for a 10-miler. Most of the training runs are at a slow and easy pace, with one tempo or interval run a week and one long run a week. Rest and slow running seems to be imperative to improvement!! When I started out, I was going hard on every run and it really took a toll on me and my body. I had several injuries and just felt tired all of the time. Since I have been taking it easy on my "easy" days and throwing in a proper amount of rest days, I have been able to train harder on my "hard" days and see significant improvements. If you don't have a training plan, I would suggest you start by taking a look at the training plan calculator on the Runners World website to get some ideas. Of course, this will probably be more benificial for your next race. Even if you don't go with a plan, it really helps to try to at least write out a plan for the week. That way, you can make sure you are not upping your mileage too quickly or stressing your body out with too many difficult runs. Just my 2 cents... again, I'm not a seasoned professional or anything. But, planning has really helped me improve! Good luck with your upcoming race! Big grin


                  Slow-smooth-fast

                    I am not follwoing any plan whatsoever, just a little advice from my brother who is an accomplished fell runner. I cant seem to find the training program on runners world.

                    "I've been following Eddy's improvement over the last two years on this site, and it's been pretty dang solid. Sure the weekly mileage has been up and down, but over the long haul he's getting out the door and has turned himself into quite a runner. He's only now just figuring out his potential. Consistency in running is measured in years, not weeks. And over the last couple of years, Eddy's made great strides" Jeff 14 Jan 2009

                      Clopper, I agree that checking out a few training plans could be helpful. I'm still pretty new at this. I've been running about a year now but have trained for a couple of half marathons and 10-milers in that time. I wanted to second what jfarm said earlier about rest days allowing your body to become stronger. I noticed on your log that last week you ran four speed-type workouts out of five days running. For a beginner, that's probably overdoing a little (or a lot! Tongue) Most training plans that I've seen call for one day of speed work per week and one long run per week. Those long runs are to be done at a *slower* pace, not all out. Maybe a minute or two slower than your race pace goal. The speed work and long run days are usually follwed by a rest day or an *easy* day to let your body repair and strengthen. I've used training plans from www.halhigdon.com and www.nikerunning.com this year as well as the one from Runnersworld.com. Using a plan is great because it helps you to avoid the trap of trying to do too much, too soon. It also keeps your mileage increasing at a reasonable amount per week. (Shouldn't be more than 10% per increase per week.) And it forces you to take a break now and then. Wink Good luck with your race!


                      madness baby

                        There's an article called "train to rest" or "train to recover" or something like that on a popular running website. I can't seem to find it right now, but here's a similar article from runnersworld. Basically, the point is to get stronger on rest days. I've especially had bad runs when I try to do 2 days in a row. Just listen to your body! http://www.runnersworld.com/article/0,7120,s6-241-285--8256-0,00.html
                        deb


                        Slow-smooth-fast

                          many thanks for the links, they are great, and really helpful. I relaise I have been overdoing it. A rest is needed as I dont want to overdo it for the big day. Also I have found that I have not been doing my easy days at a slow enough pace - it is hard to slow down for me to a 9min mile, as I feel like I would be going too slow and that I will not benefit from it - begineers mentality. Rome was not built in a Day and you must learn to walk before you can run, I need to tell myself

                          "I've been following Eddy's improvement over the last two years on this site, and it's been pretty dang solid. Sure the weekly mileage has been up and down, but over the long haul he's getting out the door and has turned himself into quite a runner. He's only now just figuring out his potential. Consistency in running is measured in years, not weeks. And over the last couple of years, Eddy's made great strides" Jeff 14 Jan 2009

                            it is hard to slow down for me to a 9min mile, as I feel like I would be going too slow and that I will not benefit from it - begineers mentality.
                            Tell me about it! I struggled with the same thing. But, once you make a conscious effort to slow it down on the easy days, you quickly realize the benefit. Plus, the slow runs can be really enjoyable and relaxing. Happy running and training!