1

Simplest question imaginable, calendar year total (Read 747 times)

    I don't generally consider myself an idiot about such things, but I feel like one now. How do you find out how many miles you ran for a calendar year? I simply can't figure it out, and now admit my inadequacy seeking help.


    day after day sameness

      There are a few different ways, here's a couple:

       

      - You can add one of the Stats 'widgets' to your log summary page.  (see my log as an example)

       

      - You can create a report within your log (Reports -> New Search -> Date Range = [your time frame], Activity = Run, click Search), then click the "Summary" button in the upper right.

       

      (Ok, I looked at your log, and you do have the 'Overall' stats widget, which is now showing you 2012...you'll want to use a report / search to collect any calendar year's data, then use the summary button)

      Choosing my words carefully has never been my strength I've been known to be vague and often pointless

        That did 'er. Thanks much.

          - You can create a report within your log (Reports -> New Search -> Date Range = [your time frame], Activity = Run, click Search), then click the "Summary" button in the upper right.

           

          Thanks, I didn't realize you could hit summary for those totals.

          "Don't feel like running today...suck it up and run ...you're an athlete." (John Stanton, founder & owner of The Running Room)

           

          Three half marathons later, I got a number. Half Fanatic #9292. :)


          HobbyJogger & HobbyRacer

            I don't generally consider myself an idiot about such things, but I feel like one now. How do you find out how many miles you ran for a calendar year? I simply can't figure it out, and now admit my inadequacy seeking help.

             

            Estimate the average shoe wear per mile, then (using calipers) measure shoe wear on your shoes (include all relevant pairs), and calculate from that.

            It's a 5k. It hurt like hell...then I tried to pick it up. The end.

              Estimate the average shoe wear per mile, then (using calipers) measure shoe wear on your shoes (include all relevant pairs), and calculate from that.

               

              Yeah, but that gets complicated depending on whether I'm trying to do Chi running or reverting to old heel-striking, because it wears in different spots, and then I have to factor weight in as well, and, well, you know ...